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The Monsanto House of the Future Story

Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average.
by , 02-09-2011 at 07:17 PM


There is an ancient Chinese Proverb that states, “Tell me and I'll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I'll understand.” Legendary Imagineer John Hench said, “Walt believed that the experience was most important. People could always read about ideas or see photographs of new concepts. They would find it more compelling if they went through it themselves. Once people experienced something first-hand they could go home to their own communities and make changes.” According to Hench, Walt said, “That experiences were the only thing that you really own. They were yours."




Monsanto wanted to expand its presence in the home construction industry. By 1953, they contracted with a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The group included architects Richard Hamilton and Marvin Goody from the Department of Architecture and engineer Albert G.H. Dietz from Plastic Research Laboratory at the Department of Building Engineering and Construction. Monsanto’s Plastics Division sponsored the project.

The goal was to design a house that would explore the maximum use of plastics as a material for home construction. The goal was to demonstrate, “Plastics used boldly creatively as building materials.” The challenge was to not simply replace wooden components with plastic ones but to find new and innovative ways to exploit the material unique characteristics, structural, and aesthetic qualities.

In 1954, Douglas Haskell of the American Institute of Architects asked, “In architecture, will atomic processes create a new ‘plastic’ order?” He thought the future meant that homes would not be massed produced like automobiles but would come from scientific laboratories.

The house was a modular, polyester structure reinforced with fibrous glass. The materials and methodology were similar to those developed by Charles Eames for his molded plastic chairs of the 1950s.


The iconic Eames molded chairs

The design was a white cruciform with four gracefully curved fiberglass wings cantilevered from a 256-square-foot central core. The central core also housed the air temperature control units. Each wing was eight feet tall, sixteen feet wide, and sixteen feet long. Overall, the house was 1,280-square feet and had three bedrooms, two baths, a living room, a dining room, a family room, and a kitchen.

The Imagineers chose a cruciform because it, “assures full daylight for every room, reduces inter-room noise, and provides added privacy for various family activities.” The design allowed for easy expansion. John Hench said, “The bottom was a “compression member” and the top had a “tension ring” that the modules hooked on to and hung from. You could hang more pairs of them as needed.” John Hench added, “There was virtually no bad location for building it…in a rocky location or on a hillside, the 16’ by 16’ pedestal would have been easy to work with.” You could even rotate it on the pedestal to change the views. Monsanto described the house as “strangely graceful.”


Disneyland opened the front door of the Monsanto House of the Future to guests on June 12, 1957. The attraction was free and it was located at a prime spot off the Plaza Hub, adjacent to the Circarama Theater. This location would ensure a huge audience. At night, when the home would glow with all of the light on, it added a special magic to the area. The attraction remained opened until 1967. It was estimated that more than 20 million guests walked through the house.

Disney proudly proclaimed, “Hardly a natural material appears anywhere in the House.” Virtually every surface was synthetic. By the early 1960s, fifteen percent of plastic production was dedicated to home building.



In 1953, MIT produced a report called Plastics in Housing to explore expanded uses of the material. The objective was “to develop plastics as a sound engineering materials and help the construction industry utilize new designs and materials to achieve production line methods and facilities.” The demonstration house was a “dramatic attack” on how to increase the acceptance of plastics as a construction material.

The tour started in the dining and family room. All of the furniture was ultra-modern and made of plastic materials. The hope was the home would stimulate your imagination.


For many, the highlight had to be the kitchen. The Kelvinator Division of American Motors Corporation designed the “step saver” kitchen. It was dubbed the “Atoms for Living Kitchen.” Many of the appliances either dropped from cabinets or popped up from the counter. A pop up dishwasher used ultrasonic waves to clean and would also be the storage unit for all of your plastic dishes. Instead of one large refrigerator freezer unit, this house featured three cooling units called “cold zones” that lowered from ceiling cabinets. One zone for regular refrigeration, one for frozen, and one for irradiated foods. Even the storage shelves lowered from the ceiling unit just by pushing a button. Rising from the counter was a microwave oven.

Sylvania Electric Products Company provided adjustable lighting behind polarized plastic ceiling tiles lights the room. Bell Telephone installed the push-button speakerphone with “preset” dialing.

The climate control system would allow for different temperatures in different zones within the house. There were even buttons where you could push the scent of roses or the ocean into any room.


The children’s room was divided in two by a sliding panel, one for the boy and one for the girl. Plastics allowed for “tough durable materials that are easily washable.” Both children shared a bathroom. The bathroom featured a movable sink that rose and fell at the push of a button.

Your next stop is the master bedroom and bathroom. For the lady, she has a vanity with a push button speakerphone. The master bath is modeled in two pieces. Along with the built-in electric razor and toothbrush is another hands-free push button phone mounted on the wall. Except, this phone also contains a closed circuit television so you can see who is at the front door. The ceiling lighting was adjustable and had panelescent panels, which act as a nightlight. There was even a sound system in the shower.

Finally, there is a spacious living room featuring a giant, non-operational, wall-mounted television screen and built-in stereo system. John Hench designed the “Alpha” chair, the first contoured chair that adjusts automatically and a phone and music system with built in speakers. Facing Sleeping Beauty Castle was ceiling to floor thermal pane picture windows featuring decorative laminated safety glass.


In an unexpected way to prove the durability of plastic, there is a legend that Disney had to go through an extraordinary effort to remove the attraction. The original plan was a one-day demolition. When the wrecking ball just bounced off the side, a new plan was drafted. For two weeks, they resorted to hacksaws to take the house apart piece by piece, according to John Hench.

For Walt Disney's proposed city, EPCOT, illustrations showed low-density single-family residential architecture that was more traditional. Instead of a neighborhood of space-age modular homes, the drawings suggest forward-looking Mid-Century ranch-style homes that might resemble the very popular homes by Joseph Eichler, a very popular Californian home builder.

Eichler hired some of the best residential architects such as A. Quincy Jones FAIA. His homes became known as “California Modern” and featured glass walls, post-and-beam construction, and open floorplans. The exteriors featured low-sloping A-framed roofs with simple, clean facades. Many of the homes had skylights and floor to ceiling glass windows. Some even had enclosed private courtyards. The houses were airy in comparison to the suburban homes being built at the time.

It was suggested that each home would generate some of its own electricity. Solid waste would be gathered and deposited in an automated vacuum collection system, which are pneumatic tubes that send the trash to a central collection point. Aerojet-General was responsible for the design of this system when the Magic Kingdom opened in 1971.


EDITORS NOTE: The Monsanto House of the Future is an enduring memory. Millions of people associate that attraction with the optimistic future evangelized by Walt Disney. Of course, in retrospect, an all plastic house doesn't seem like a warm and inviting place to live. But for the modernists of the mid 1950's the house was a revelation. Is the Tomorrowland of today missing the sort of future-tech that the House of the Future represented in its time? Is the never ending chase for the future an impossibility that Tomorrowland is incapable of capturing with any consistency? Would a "House of Tomorrow" be possible (or even desirable) in today's Disneyland . . . What say you?




If you enjoyed today's article, then you will LOVE the new book written By Sam Gennawey, Walt and the Promise of Progress City.




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Updated 02-29-2012 at 09:52 PM by Dustysage (Updated)

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Comments

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  1. Fishbulb's Avatar
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    WOW! This was such a treat! I had always wondered what the House of the Future looked like inside and what it was all about. It was basically one big commercial. Come to think of it I suppose the whole park is too, but I digress.

    Thanks for the great, in-depth article.
  2. Mousecat's Avatar
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    It is important to remember that Walt Disney truly believed that hard work, imagination, and American technology could solve virtually any problem. I think the house if far more forward leaning then the dream house that currently haunts Disneyland's Innoventions.

    Sam
    SamLand's Disney Adventures
  3. downtownBLUE's Avatar
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    Great post. For anyone on the east coast, the MIT Museum in Cambridge, MA has some of the original plans on display as part of the MIT 150th Anniversary. We all know how important this attraction was to the history of Disneyland, but the MIT community even selected the house as one of the top 150 MIT accomplishments/historic artifacts of that institution too. Cool, eh?

    MIT150 Exhibition Website Page of the House
  4. explodingboy's Avatar
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    Very nice article! Love the House!
  5. Dustysage's Avatar
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    First, LOVED the article Sam. Thank you!

    Even though it was one big commercial for several companies, the House of the Future was a very worlds fair sort of endeavor which really fit with Tomorrowland (in a much better way than the current Innoventions does). However, attractions like the House of the Future become out of date so quickly, I'm not sure that they are practical. I think that's the big dilemma with Tomorrowland as a whole.
    Updated 02-10-2011 at 09:46 AM by Dustysage
  6. DrAlice's Avatar
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    Those videos are awesome (and hysterical!). Thanks for this! Love it...
  7. ttrocc7007's Avatar
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    Until Pixie Hollow was built, the foundation piling for the house was still visible, though somewhat overgrown.
    One can still see the house referred to in the mural that currently adorns the Innoventions building, as well as serving as a pedestal for a coffee table in the contemoporary home of the future inside Innoventions.
    Thanks!
  8. 's Avatar
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    Outdated to some I still prefer this vision of the future. Great article. My only quibble with this article is that it leaves out Palmer and Kreisel who are as important to California Modernism as Eichler and Jones.
  9. AzGizmo's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing this wonderful slice of history.

    The Monsanto House was there when I first visited Disneyland in (I think) 1967. We were only there for the one day so we didn't have any time to go through it, but I had always wondered what it was like.

    Thanks again... This was an EXCELLENT article!!!
  10. Bryce05's Avatar
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    If Disney did something like this today people would be up in arms.
  11. DisWedWay's Avatar
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    When the new Tomorrowland was going in to place in 1998, the footings were still there where the House of the Future used to sit. There has been talk about bringing it back in an updated version. PD
  12. Bruce Bergman's Avatar
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    And I was just a wee lad of six when the House Of The Future went away to Neverland, but Mom tells me I was utterly fascinated with it...

    Fast forward to today, and I'm thinking "Gee, get me a set of plans, and I'll bring the seismic and fire code concerns up to current standards, then find a nice little hilltop..."

    Technology has caught up, now a huge flat-screen TV is not only practical but affordable. And it's a Whole Lot Easier to do things like zoned air conditioning (Mini-Splits) and the like. The kitchen could even keep the built in refrigeration - but lose the motorized drop-downs, that still looks like a maintenance nightmare IMNSHO.

    And that design could also be the PERFECT design for factory modular construction, perfect for Post-Katrina living - the Core and all the Wing sections sized to truck in (and right back out in a few years), and minimal site preparation perfect for bad soil conditions - 4 caissons or driven piles, or a simple square stem wall and footing.

    And you could always change out to larger (longer) Wing modules later to remodel and expand. Or change to a two-story Core with an elevator.

    The dream of EPCOT, lost. Experimental Prototype Community Of Tomorrow.

    --<< Bruce >>--
  13. triesch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttrocc7007
    One can still see the house referred to in the mural that currently adorns the Innoventions building, as well as serving as a pedestal for a coffee table in the contemoporary home of the future inside Innoventions.
    Thanks!
    Here's the house as seen on the exterior of the Innoventions building:



    And here's the house used as the base of a table inside the current "House of the Future":


    Both of those shots were taken in December 2008 by me.

    -Jon
  14. Mousecat's Avatar
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    I love it. Does anybody have pictures of them inside the house?

    Sam
    SamLand's Disney Adventures
  15. Goin2DL's Avatar
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    Very cool!
    My step-dad (who is 60) told me that the first place he ever saw a push button phone was at Disneyland inside the House of the Future!
  16. Villains Fan's Avatar
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    Great article. I always wondered what this house had looked like inside, but had never seen anything on it. Thanks!
  17. Mousecat's Avatar
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    I had this idea that Disney could reproduce a bunch of these units, set them up somewhere at WDW, and rent them out like Treehouse Villas. I would stay in one.

    Sam
    SamLand's Disney Adventures
  18. diametricdreams's Avatar
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    I love this story, very interesting! I especially like how proud they were that there were no natural materials there. Imagine saying that now...

    I don't think a House of the Future would really be desirable in Tomorrowland today, though. This kind of goes along with my overall feelings about Tomorrowland, but because the basis of the land (and this attraction) was reliant on the modern era and the idea of never ending progress, it's not something that really fits in the postmodern world. We don't see the world like we used to, and I think Disney has to change Tomorrowland to fit our postmodern mentality, not try to make old attractions fit back in.
  19. DisWedWay's Avatar
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    The big new tech shows in Vegas and Japan show the public has an interest in what might be in their future. Disneyland's Tomorrowland is the place to show it. I remember updating the GE Carousel of Progress several times in the final act as technology progressed. Love that show old and new. Maybe one day we will have the Time Machine movies talking rings to tell us about future attractions. PD
  20. kindagoofy's Avatar
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    Fabulous article. I so wish I had been able to see the HOF! Alas, it was demolished before I even had a chance. Here's a link to a totally decked out site that has floor plans (shown below from Davelandweb.com), constrction photos, sketches, and interior poses:
    Daveland Disneyland House of the Future Photo Page


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