Blog Comments

  1. biggsworth's Avatar
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    Would have been awesome. They could still do it of course with some modifications but we all know that won't happen!
  2. dougeebear's Avatar
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    I have loved this concept since I first became aware of it. Even earlier, when seeing Temple of Doom in theaters, I knew that the mine train sequence was destined to become a theme park attraction.

    But I suspect operational issues also became apparent. Apart from the defunct PeopleMover and the defunct Skyway, I can't think of any attraction that allows you to peek inside another. What would happen if Indy went 101? Would they have to reroute the Jungle Cruise to prevent people seeing into Indy with the work lights on? Or would a dramatic black plastic sheet be hung like they've been doing at WDW's and Paris' Big Thunder?
  3. waltopia's Avatar
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    It's sad because DisCo. is willing to WASTE that kind of money on several stupid movies every year, with a shelf life of about 15 minutes, while they constantly cheap out on park attractions that will stand for decades collecting a day rate of nearly a $100. per person to see them. Its a depressingly long story of what 'might have been', over and again in every Disney land. At least Tokyo gets impressive results when they do spend.
  4. wallaceproject's Avatar
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    That would've been awesome, yet expensive.
  5. ahecht's Avatar
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    Seawolf, don't forget about inflation. $200 million in 1980 is equivalent to about $525 million in 2010. In addition, inflation-adjusted prices for construction materials such as steel have gone up 60% since the 1980s (thanks to greater demand from Asia). It's likely that the Lost Expedition would've cost more than twice what RSR did if built today.
  6. indianajack's Avatar
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    Obviously, I would have loved this to come to fruition. I'm still surprised Disney has not yet built a coaster themed to the mine car chase in Temple of Doom. A no-brainer if you ask me.
  7. Seawolf's Avatar
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    Every time I read about this concept it makes me cringe that WDI spent 300 million on RSR.
  8. flayrah's Avatar
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    Drago, the answer to your question is $$$. Quality, Creativity, and Uniqueness takes money and/or time. Eisner didn't want to invest in either and his only concern was forwarding the Disney brand in any way possible - not in strengthening or building the identity, but withdrawing from the creative account. I'll have to say he wasn't stupid, just lacked vision or purpose beyond the financial bottom line.
  9. DragoHarley's Avatar
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    The Muppets are silly. I love them. It's really sad that DHS didn't get the Muppets Land and the Roger Rabbit Land with its "Maroon Cartoons" backlot. The more I read and research Disney the bigger fool I realize Michael Eisner was -- probably one of the stupidest people alive. DHS could have been so great, but he strove for mediocrity. Why?
  10. DisneylandMaster's Avatar
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    Muppet-Vision 3D needs MUCH NEEDED ATTENTION. Going to the show in DCA before the new film opened, the theater was near empty. A few days after the film opened, the theater was PACKED. It's amazing, because the Muppets have not died or gone anywhere. I even recall someone coming out of the show saying something as simple as "That was awesome!" to "Now I remember why I loved those guys!" They are still going 20 years strong, and continue to make audiences laugh.
  11. KingEric's Avatar
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    lol
  12. disneydyl's Avatar
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    I have not yet visited this wonderfully themed park, but I can now clearly see where Disney gets its theme park magic. Wonderful article showcasing the genius design and beauty put into this ground breaking park. I'm sure it will remain a prime example of exquisite theming for years to come.
  13. Dustysage's Avatar
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    I think you are right about Six Flags Great adventure being the first theme park. I clearly remember Disneyland adding themed "lands" in the mid 70's. Before that time, the park was just a collection of rides and and old woman in mouse ears whom they called "Mickey." Though Disney has been trying to rewrite their history for years, no park will ever reach the levels of theme, design and wonder as the SixFlags parks.

    SixFlags clearly hit the standard, with even Disney's top executives claiming "If it's good enough for SixFlags, it's good enough for us," when building California Adventure. DCA is still trying to live up to the SixFlags standard, as are Universal, SeaWorld and the rest of the world's great theme parks.

    Dusty
  14. ImagiNERDing's Avatar
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    Someone really needs to write a book on this. Wasn't one of the chief designers called Trolly Stump?
  15. RegionsBeyond's Avatar
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    I sure do miss "Western Time Alley" which had authentic burros you could pet, just like in all those classic westerns, and you might even see an authentic crazy old timer/prospector cooking up a mess of beans.

    And then, who can forget the main ride in the area, 'WestWorld' (which was pretty much clips of Yul Brynner played inside a roller coaster). The meet and greets for WestWorld weren't very popular though...something about the robotic cowboys insisting on random gunfights kind of scared guests away. Who knows?
  16. JeffHeimbuch's Avatar
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    Thanks for reading, folks! Glad you enjoyed it, and I knew I was going to surprise some of you with the possibility of a 4th Caballero!

    If you can seek them out, I HIGHLY suggest the Don Rosa comics!
  17. Timekeeper's Avatar
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    Great Article! I say, finish the film already or make a new short film featuring this character.


    Timekeeper
  18. Let's Enunciate's Avatar
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    The end of the war opened up new foreign markets for Disney films, allowing them to expand their horizons. The goodwill program, no longer needed after the war ended, was defunded and closed its doors.
    Whoever figured the goodwill program wasn't needed seriously dropped the ball. There was a Cold War, a missile crisis, and we still have a tourism embargo of Cuba! Of course hindsight is always 20/20 but in retrospect it seems almost naive to think that Disney movies could have improved Cuban/American relations...
  19. Bronco21's Avatar
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    Very interesting... Walt & El Grupo is truly a fantastic film and opened my eyes to what really occured in the studio at the time and how the real world affected the films.
  20. MarkTwain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheHopper
    I don't know...a cartoon character that represents another country...hard for that not to end badly.
    But he wouldn't have been the first. I'm sure he was going to represent Cuba in the way Jose Carioca was meant to represent Brazil ("Carioca" is actually slang for a person from Rio de Janeiro), and Panchito Pistoles was meant to represent Mexico.
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