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  1. #1

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    A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    When I got hired they gave me a medical question form to fill out.

    Doesn't that violate the right to privacy act? You are handing in personal PRIVATE info to non medical people who have no right to that information.

    Then they put me on medical hold and had to go to their on site nurse to say yes you can work. OK fine but it seemed very wrong to me.

    BTW I decided not to work there because I get paid better at a retail store. I was even told what placement I would have at Disneyland when I was hired and then told something way different after I did the traditions thing.

    So I think anyone who bellyaches about castmembers complaining about the work enviorment should at least apply and see what jerk they are.

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  2. #2

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Hm, I had to fill out a medical form too. I noted that I was squeamish and sometimes fainted. They then instructed me to write a list of any things which could cause me to faint. Is this not permissible by law?

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  3. #3

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Quote Originally Posted by melmel
    Hm, I had to fill out a medical form too. I noted that I was squeamish and sometimes fainted. They then instructed me to write a list of any things which could cause me to faint. Is this not permissible by law?
    In don't know about the law, but if you disclosed to them what made you faint (watching things go around, for example), and they decided to make you the operator of Dumbo anyway, wouldn't that seem like a lawsuit waiting to happen?

    Secondly, it doesn't seem that they retracted the hiring based on the medical questionnaire. That would be some kind of law-breaking thingy.

    Lastly, I think a lot of the labor issues that DL is having now could be solved if more guests paid a reasonable amount to enter the park.
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  4. #4

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    I agree with Sediment. Employers should know about your health so they can do the best to make sure that you would not be doing a job that can harm your health.

  5. #5

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    I work for Columbus Public Schools... we had to fill out a medical information form to file with the secretaries after I was hired (as well as TB tests and such). This is purely voluntary for one thing, but for another, it's wise that they know if you have any conditions so that they don't put you in the hot sun if you're prone to dangerous side-effects from being out there too long, or put you somewhere that may give you an allergic reaction (such as the soaps and such associated with janitorial work), etc. etc. etc. And, of course, if something does happen, they know who to contact and/or what should be done to help you.

    I personally think it's a very unwise decision to refuse to fill this out. It probably would be filed with the staff nurse, wouldn't it?
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  6. #6

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    It is not agaibst the law to ask- medical information is private and only you can disclose it. Also, they can only use it for reasons they have disclosed to you. I would think it would be to your benefit that your employer be aware of any medical problems you might have so that you might not be put in a position for your condition to be aggraveated. Say you have a bad back, would it be wise to place you in stores where you would have to life heavy boxes?

    They can only ask what you are willing to tell them and you only have to tell them about what might affect your ability to work.
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  7. #7

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Your employer cannot deny you employment for health issues, but does have the right to ask medical questions. Especially if there are issues of safety related to your condition. Many companies now are charging higher premiums for health insurance for those that smoke or have other risky behaviors. These are huge costs for the companies, and it will trickle down to us, the consumer in higher prices.


  8. #8

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    I don't think it's a problem where health is relevent to the job, i.e involves heavy lifting, repetive motion, exposure to certain chemicals or allergans.

    I had to take a pee test for my job, but I worked at a Nuke plant and most people think that's a reasonable work environment in which you want to make sure your employees are not under the influence. Additionally, a psychological exam (MBTI) was required for certain positions, as well as an FBI background check - would you believe I passed?

  9. #9

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Quote Originally Posted by General You
    Additionally, a psychological exam (MBTI) was required for certain positions, as well as an FBI background check - would you believe I passed?
    I bet you didn't tell them you had an AP....

  10. #10

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    See Disclosure: It' a Personal decision

    Should Disclosure Occur
    It is generally not considered standard practice for applicants to disclose their disability in their resume and/or application letter unless:
    • it is relevant to the position
    • work related adjustments are required to ensure equal opportunity in the selection process and/or
    • the organization is supportive of equity practices.
    Disclosure of disability should not be the central issue of concern in the process of seeking employment . As with all steps in the job recruitment process, the emphasis in applying for employment should be on the skills and experiences of the applicant to meet the requirements of the position.

    Application Forms
    Some organizations require applicants to complete an application form as part of the recruitment process. Application forms are often used by organizations to obtain specific information about applicants, to readily make a direct comparison between applicants on the same issues and/or to assess their ability to express themselves in a concise manner.
    Some application forms may also contain specific questions about disabilities and health issues. The following questions and answers may assist applicants with a disability and employers in understanding their rights, roles and responsibilities in asking and responding to disability specific questions in application forms:
    Can Employment Application Forms ask About Disability?
    Application forms should only ask questions about an applicant's disability if the information required assists to identify any work related adjustments required to ensure equal opportunity in the selection process.
    'Employers should be cautious about including disability related questions in application forms, other than for the purpose of inviting applicants to identify any adjustments required to ensure equal opportunity in the selection process itself. Routine or standard questions should be reviewed to ensure that they are included for a good reason and not for discriminatory reasons. The Disability Discrimination Act (D.D.A.) (Section 30) specifically makes it unlawful to request information for the purpose of an act which is or would be unlawful' . (1)
    Application forms may tend to ask disability specific questions to determine an applicant's ability to perform the inherent requirements of the job. Employers need to consider whether disability specific information is relevant to the inherent requirements of the position and if so whether it is more appropriate to ask these questions in an interview, rather than on an application form.
    'Employers should note that questions which may be reasonable and permitted at interview, for example to examine whether a person's disability affects their ability to perform the inherent requirements of the job or to determine whether reasonable adjustment is required and possible, will not necessarily be regarded as reasonable or permitted in an application form' .(2)
    A routine or direct question about disability, such as "have you ever had a mental illness?" in an application form may exclude or disadvantage applicants with a disability. If a question has this effect it may be considered discriminatory. These questions also tend not to relate to the inherent requirements of the position nor assist in identifying any work related adjustments required.
    The Federal Privacy Act 1988 and other similar state privacy legislation requires government, large organizations and some smaller organizations to provide a statement on any form indicating how personal information will be used. Employers therefore are required to take reasonable steps to inform applicants about why they are collecting personal information, such as disability specific information, how they are using the information, whom they are disclosing the information to and how the information is to be stored. For further information refer to the Privacy and Confidentialitydocument in this resource and/or the Federal Privacy Act website at http://www.privacy.gov.au
    Is There a Legal Responsibility for an Applicant to Disclose their Disability in an Application Form?
    There is no legal obligation for an applicant to disclose their disability in an application form. An applicant may choose to ignore the disability specific questions or answer the question(s) as 'Not Applicable'.
    All applicants, including applicants with a disability, are however responsible for investigating and understanding the inherent requirements of the position to determine whether they are able to perform them in the position of employment. Applicants with a disability who require work related adjustments to meet the inherent requirements of the position may choose to disclose their disability when accepting a job interview, in the interview or when the position of employment has been offered.

    There is much more useful info to be found on this site. Hope it helps.
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  11. #11

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    On the flip side of the above, a company doesn't have to make an accomodation to a disability if you fail to disclose it as something that might impact your work

  12. #12

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Quote Originally Posted by Garrett240
    I bet you didn't tell them you had an AP....
    Well, I didn't at the time - but then much has happend to me over the years

  13. #13

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Quote Originally Posted by General You
    On the flip side of the above, a company doesn't have to make an accomodation to a disability if you fail to disclose it as something that might impact your work
    If the company has more than 15 employees they do. See: The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: Disability Discrimination

    Note: Title I of the ADA (1990) also covers:
    Medical Examinations and Inquiries Employers may not ask job applicants about the existence, nature, or severity of a disability. Applicants may be asked about their ability to perform specific job functions. A job offer may be conditioned on the results of a medical examination, but only if the examination is required for all entering employees in similar jobs. Medical examinations of employees must be job related and consistent with the employer's business needs.
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  14. #14

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    Re: A question about the morality of ask about a person's Health

    Quote Originally Posted by dramaqueen
    I would think it would be to your benefit that your employer be aware of any medical problems you might have so that you might not be put in a position for your condition to be aggraveated. Say you have a bad back, would it be wise to place you in stores where you would have to life heavy boxes?
    I disclosed that I did have a bad back, but we all concluded that there wasn't much in the DLR stores that were too heavy for me. (I wasn't doing stock). Yet, they then schedule me to do strollers (shift from hell ) which did require lifting those buggers over the height of my head. Naive old me didn't realize that strollers were part of Store Operations, and they neglected to tell me.

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