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  1. #151

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    Well bike racks on any local buses would be a good suggestion at City Hall.

    If that aforementioned bike path led to the esplanade that would be a cool way to get to DLR if Disney provided bike lockers in the esplanade.

    It would be cheaper than the Mickey and Friends and help people burn off churros.

    The local Metro buses in Los Angeles (LACMTA buses) almost all have a bike rack in front of the driver for 1 or two bikes.
    See, that's not a problem. Most OCTA buses have bike racks as well. The problem is if the bus pulls up and there are already two bikes on the rack. That's when you're SOL.

  2. #152

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    It's only a couple of miles from the train stations to the park, right? Not a problem on a bike. I'm riding 9 miles a day going to and from the college without much of a problem. It only takes me about 20 minutes to go each direction.
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  3. #153

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    Exclamation Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Which Way for the Next Light-Rail Line in L.A. County?

    L.A. transit agency weighs competing plans for lines to the Westside and San Gabriel Valley.

    By Jean Guccione, LA Times
    September 3, 2006

    As they prepare to set spending priorities for the next quarter-century, Los Angeles County transit officials are bracing for a head-on collision over where to build the next light-rail line.

    Should the Westside's proposed Expo Line be extended all the way from downtown to Santa Monica? Or should Pasadena's Gold Line grow 13 miles east to Montclair?

    Though construction is still years away, long-range planning decisions reached over the next several months will determine the pecking order for major county transit projects through 2030.

    Even if both light-rail proposals are considered worthy, some transit officials doubt that the federal government would spring for two $1-billion transportation projects in the same county at the same time, escalating the competition for federal dollars.

    "There is no question that traffic is getting worse everywhere," said Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, who wants the Westside's Expo Line extension built next. "Now the question is, if you have a limited amount of money, where do you spend it?"

    Rep. David Dreier (R-San Dimas) says funds should be allocated to the San Gabriel Valley, where thousands of new, affordable homes are luring workers and increasing freeway congestion.

    Dreier envisions someday extending the line even farther east, to Ontario Airport — a move that he argues also would benefit the Westside by shifting some travelers away from Los Angeles International Airport.

    "We need to build Expo, but the Gold Line is my priority," Dreier said in an interview Thursday. "I think we have the potential to do both."

    The dueling proposals are attracting more attention now as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority moves closer to deciding which of dozens of proposed transit improvements should be funded in coming years.

    Projects must be part of the agency's long-range plan to qualify for federal funds. The plan is scheduled for adoption early next year.

    This year's competition is particularly fierce as officials anticipate how they might spend up to $12 billion on one-time capital projects if voters approve the state transportation bond issue in November. Without voter approval, the agency would allocate an estimated $7 billion in existing funds to new projects.

    Even with the state bond money, transit officials said, they still would have to seek matching federal funds to begin building light-rail extensions within the next few years. The MTA's capital funds cover streets and highways, as well as buses and rail.

    "Money is going to be very tight," said Carol Inge, chief planning officer. "We have a longer list of projects than we have money overall."

    Officials have yet to decide which projects they will request funding for in the long-range plan, Inge said.

    Construction priorities are based on ridership projections and cost effectiveness, measured in costs per mile and costs per passenger, according to MTA board policy.

    In 2001, the last time projects were ranked, the MTA board of directors gave the Expo Line a high priority.

    Construction is scheduled to begin soon on the first part of the line — from downtown Los Angeles to Culver City.

    The next proposed segment, from Culver City to Santa Monica, is in the long-range plan but has not yet been funded. It is expected to cost $750 million to build.

    The Gold Line extension did not make it into the MTA's 2001 long-range plan. A preliminary draft of the agency's 2006 priorities shows other, more costly, projects — such as Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's proposed subway to the sea — ranking higher.

    Because ridership on the Gold Line's 14-mile route between Union Station near downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena turned out to be lower than expected, a further extension of the line was placed somewhere in the middle of this year's preliminary long-range plan.

    Ridership on the Pasadena line hit a high of 20,000 weekday boardings in July, according to the MTA. Weekend ridership, however, has dropped significantly over the last year.

    Duarte City Councilman John Fasana, who sits on the MTA board, said ridership would increase if the Pasadena-based line were extended farther into the fast-growing San Gabriel Valley.

    The region's three east-west freeways are packed with big trucks serving the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, as well as thousands of commuters, many traveling from their homes in the Inland Empire.

    Last year, the counties of Riverside and San Bernardino issued 51,000 residential building permits, and their region ranked seventh in the nation for new-home growth, according to California Department of Transportation statistics. More than 153,000 permits were issued in those two counties in the four previous years.

    Still, Yaroslavsky said the Gold Line ridership numbers, estimated at 6.3 million boardings a year, do not support the proposed extension at this time. Statistics, he said, favor additional mass transit on the burgeoning Westside as a top countywide priority.

    "If you look at this objectively and leave the politics out, it bears no comparison to anything else," he said of the Westside's need.

    The Westside has no commuter rail line. Its two freeways, the Santa Monica and San Diego, are "parking lots," he said. And the area's major hubs — Santa Monica, Century City, Westwood and Culver City — are experiencing major residential and commercial growth.

    Duarte's Fasana said he expects that the Gold Line extension would be included in the upcoming long-range plan — and that, if the state bond measure passes, "I think there is an ability to build both projects."

    Gold Line proponents aren't taking any chances. They are trying to leap-frog ahead of the proposed Westside line by appealing directly to Congress for funds.

    Habib Balian, chief executive officer of the Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority, is leading the charge. He acknowledges that the strategy is "totally unconventional."

    The construction authority was created by the Legislature to oversee construction but not operation of the Gold Line to Pasadena. The MTA runs the line.

    Balian doesn't view his renegade tactics as distracting support for the Expo Line in any way.

    "I believe all meritorious projects will be funded," he said.

    Balian pointed out that he is not asking the MTA to pay for construction of the extension. The agency simply would have to commit to run the extended Gold Line — at a cost of about $10 million a year — after it is built.

    The MTA needs to promise to pay for operation of the rail line for federal construction funds to be secured, he said.

    While waiting for decisions, both sides are proceeding as if their projects have made the cut.

    Even before ground has been broken on the Expo Line to Culver City, its construction authority is seeking proposals for an environmental study of construction from Culver City to Santa Monica.

    The Gold Line construction authority, meanwhile, is studying the effect of its proposed two-phase extension: 10.5 miles from Pasadena to Azusa, followed by 13.1 miles to Montclair.

    People on both sides acknowledge that the county's need for public transportation is great everywhere.

    Despite his support for the Gold Line project, Dreier said freeway congestion on the Westside and elsewhere affects all Los Angeles County residents, no matter where they live.

    "My constituents want to have the ability to go to the beach, the mountains, the desert or wherever," he said.

  4. #154

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    Smile Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    I think it's going to be a while before a Metrorail line connects Union Station to Anaheim but early morning and late night Metrolink service might work! Then you would be plugged into the LA County light rail and subway lines from Union Station...

    Meanwhile the EXPO line color controversy continues...

    EDITORIALS

    http://www.latimes.com/news/printedi...,4682081.story


    Please, Just Pick a Metro Color

    Flip a coin or something -- just stop wasting public time with the stupid train-hue ado.
    September 1, 2006

    AT FIRST, THE WHOLE AQUA vs. cardinal vs. rose debate seemed kind of funny. Board members at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority have been hopelessly deadlocked over the symbology of color, unable to decide on a visual designation for the new light-rail line that will run down Exposition Boulevard from downtown Los Angeles to Culver City beginning in 2010 at the earliest.

    But now that the argument has eaten untold hours at half a dozen MTA committee and board meetings since March, we're no longer laughing.

    Some want to call the train the Cardinal Line because it runs past USC, whose colors are cardinal and gold. Others favor the Aqua Line, to symbolize the ocean, though it won't yet go that far. (It's hoped that the tracks will eventually make it to the coast in Santa Monica somewhere, but the route hasn't been planned.) Still others favor the Rose Line because of Exposition Park's famous rose garden.

    The great color debate reached its apex of absurdity last week when the MTA board, after about an hour of pointless discussion, deadlocked on a vote that was intended to resolve the matter.

    With cardinal apparently out of the running, the battle is now down to rose and aqua. The latter color is favored by the MTA staff, which has been using it for years on maps. But City Councilman Bernard Parks frets that aqua doesn't "resonate," whatever that means. He has somehow persuaded half the MTA board to take his side, including Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who should know better.

    In the meantime, the project will simply be known as the Expo Line, making it the only MTA line named after a street rather than a color. On maps, it will probably show up as a broken black line.

    This debate is as pointless as it is silly. It's not as if the five existing transit-line colors symbolize anything. The new color needs to have two qualities: It needs to stand out on a map, and it needs to be different from the other colors.

    Last we checked, the rainbow still had seven colors. Some innovative transit planners — including in L.A.! — have even gone beyond the basic seven and chosen a color outside the rainbow. Maybe at their next meeting the MTA board could hear a presentation from Sherwin-Williams.

    Our position on the hue review: We couldn't care less. Flip a coin, play a game of rock-paper-scissors, pick a color out of a hat — and move on to more important business, such as expanding the subway down Wilshire Boulevard. Thousands of commuting Angelenos will be tickled pink.

  5. #155

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    I would LOVE for a line to drop right off at Disneyland, especially if I get the job there!

  6. #156

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    There they go again.

    The work on the freeway between LA and LV has once again sparked up more conversations about the highly unlikely chance of connecting the two via a high speed train.

    This article just talks about a train to "Southern California," but all other discussions on such a thing always specifically suggest a train to Anaheim.

  7. #157

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    Please, Just Pick a Metro Color

    Flip a coin or something -- just stop wasting public time with the stupid train-hue ado.
    I agree completely.

    Is there anything wrong with numbering them? Or using the end-of-the-line as the moniker? The Long Beach Line. The Valley Line. The Pasadena Line. The Redondo Beach - Norwalk Line.

    I also think the Pasadena Line needs to be extended before the Westside Line gets extended. Westsiders drive cars. There is still plenty of mobility (people deciding where to live, preferably near a rail station if work is on the other end) out in the San Gabriel Valley.

    Extending Metrolink train hours is a great idea, except that the Metrolink isn't the only train on those tracks. Sure, it would be better to create an elevated (or sometimes underground) BART-like train system that runs on its own tracks. Just use the current rights of way.
    BART works well, because the trains come every 5 minutes during rush hour, and every 20 minutes or so at non-peak times, and run early and late, because no freight trains or Amtrak trains are running on those lines.
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  8. #158

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by MickeyMania View Post
    There they go again.

    The work on the freeway between LA and LV has once again sparked up more conversations about the highly unlikely chance of connecting the two via a high speed train.

    This article just talks about a train to "Southern California," but all other discussions on such a thing always specifically suggest a train to Anaheim.
    I would recommend the following for LV:
    1. MagLev trains from Ontario Airport and from Palmdale Airport. Any farther destinations can be added on later.
    2. Main LV station would be at or around Desert Inn Rd. (Note to self: start buying land.)
    3. At the station, people can check in and have their baggage taken to their hotels. Heck, baggage could be checked in at Ontario and Palmdale, packed onto the train according hotel, and delivered in components with a special monorail train.
    4. Strip monorail expanded to both sides of the Strip, with two tracks for going in each direction, stopping at each hotel. Taxis for the impatient.
    5. Downtown monorail drops people off in a central location, though the baggage is handled by each

    Downsides: fewer taxis and rental cars needed. They'd be used mainly for off-strip places. Hard Rock, for example, would have its own shuttle.
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  9. #159

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by sediment View Post
    I agree completely.

    Is there anything wrong with numbering them? Or using the end-of-the-line as the moniker? The Long Beach Line. The Valley Line. The Pasadena Line. The Redondo Beach - Norwalk Line.

    I also think the Pasadena Line needs to be extended before the Westside Line gets extended. Westsiders drive cars. There is still plenty of mobility (people deciding where to live, preferably near a rail station if work is on the other end) out in the San Gabriel Valley.

    Extending Metrolink train hours is a great idea, except that the Metrolink isn't the only train on those tracks. Sure, it would be better to create an elevated (or sometimes underground) BART-like train system that runs on its own tracks. Just use the current rights of way.
    BART works well, because the trains come every 5 minutes during rush hour, and every 20 minutes or so at non-peak times, and run early and late, because no freight trains or Amtrak trains are running on those lines.
    I actually think the Westside line should receive priority. There's nothing over there right now. Conversely, people in Montclair can take Metrolink.

    The Expo Line seems as if it will be running a little too far South of where it needs to be. Ideally, the line should run as close as possible to Wilshire.

    My vote goes to the idea of a monorail down Wilshire Boulevard. ... called the "Purple Line".
    Last edited by PragmaticIdealist; 09-06-2006 at 08:15 PM.

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    Cool Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
    The Expo Line seems as if it will be running a little too far South of where it needs to be. Ideally, the line should run as close as possible to Wilshire.

    My vote goes to the idea of a monorail down Wilshire Boulevard. ... called the "Purple Line".

    If you go back a couple of pages on this thread you'll see that at the last meeting of the MTA Board, they voted unanimously to rename the Red Line from Union Station to Wilshire/Western "THE PURPLE LINE", in anticipation of Mayor Villaraigosa's push to get a subway extension down Wilshire.

    This was to make it clear what line is being expanded, so Valley people don't get their hopes (or feathers) up when they hear the subway is being extended.

    This will cost many times more per mile than the Expo line and Gold Line extensions currently in the planning stages but the heavy rail subway trains carry more people per train than the light rail lines do. So Villaraigosa campaigned in part on a Wilshire Subway extension and expect him to work his connections from the years he was State Assembly Speaker (I think that was his title) and get this funding into the Schwartzenegger Infrastructure Bond they want to pass.

  11. #161

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    Why doesn't METRO LINK and AMTRAK make sure a train comes up every evening from San Diego stopping in Anaheim, ending in Union Station to bring LA people home from all the tourist spots. If they promoted it, they could pull from a whole new group of travellers who'd swap the I-5 drive for the comfort of rail for their families on vacation.
    Amtrak DOES have trains going from San Diego to Union at night. There are 6 to be exact (leaving Anaheim between 6pm and 11pm). The problem is that they STOP at Union and don't continue North. What they need to do is take train #595 (which is a daily train leaving Anaheim@10:18pm/Fullerton@10:27pm) and extend it to at LEAST Camarillo or Oxnard. Hell, even if it only went as far as Northridge, Chatsworth, or Simi, at least that would be better than the lack of options we currently have (I agree with alphabassetgrrl, the Amtrak bus is NOT an option for us in VC).

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by ClubDisCM View Post
    What they need to do is take train #595 (which is a daily train leaving Anaheim@10:18pm/Fullerton@10:27pm) and extend it to at LEAST Camarillo or Oxnard. Hell, even if it only went as far as Northridge, Chatsworth, or Simi, at least that would be better than the lack of options we currently have (I agree with alphabassetgrrl, the Amtrak bus is NOT an option for us in VC).
    Yep, I could get home nicely from one of those stations. And not have to leave DL before the fireworks!
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  13. #163

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    alphabassetgrrl, what we could do is drive to Sun Valley or Burbank and take the Metrolink Antelope Valley Line to Union, then either Amtrak or Metrolink to Fullerton or Anaheim. Then coming home take Surfliner #589 which leaves Fullerton at 8:13, gets to Union at 8:50 then take the Antelope Valley Metrolink that leaves at 9pm. The only issue is if the Surfliner is running late and we miss the 9pm Metrolink then we're stuck at Union with no way to get home or to our cars.

  14. #164

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    I would love it if there was a train from Vegas to Disneyland,,We would be able to go more often. Traffic is stop & go at times and in the desert that can be bad

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    The problem I have with transit is that they dont run late enough. I cant stay to midnight because the last metrolink leaves union station at 7pm. cmon!
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