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  1. #166

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    Cool Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by MickeyMania View Post
    There they go again.

    The work on the freeway between LA and LV has once again sparked up more conversations about the highly unlikely chance of connecting the two via a high speed train.

    This article just talks about a train to "Southern California," but all other discussions on such a thing always specifically suggest a train to Anaheim.

    Well, the LA Times specifically talks about the new ANAHEIM INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION CENTER, the largest in the state, when it opens, and specifically talks about a high speed rail line going on the ballot in 2008.

    And the land has been purchased and plans are ready to go. This article was printed before the deal had been finalized but there is a lot of cool information in it.

    Anaheim Transit Center Is a Step Closer to Reality

    Tentative land deal is set for bus and rail hub that has been in planning stages for 15 years.

    By David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
    August 6, 2006

    Anaheim's vision of one of the largest transit centers in Southern California — between Angel Stadium and the Arrowhead Pond and 15 years in the planning — is coming into focus.

    Last week, Anaheim Mayor Curt Pringle, county supervisors and the Orange County Transportation Authority tentatively reached an agreement to buy 13 1/2 acres from the county for $32.5 million.

    "We needed the land first, and we're going to get it," Pringle said, referring to confidential negotiations for the coveted land. Both boards are expected to approve the deal this month.

    Plans call for the Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center to include the county's largest bus terminal, a parking structure, platforms for Amtrak and Metrolink trains and room to add tracks for high-speed rail.

    The project would also have commercial and retail space the city hopes will entice private developers to build the station.

    As envisioned, shuttles would connect the station to Anaheim's resort district and convention center, entertainment venues, local hospitals and other major employers.

    City officials say the transportation center will help the city's Platinum Triangle become Orange County's urban hub.

    The Platinum Triangle is 807 acres east of Disneyland wedged between the Santa Ana Freeway and the Santa Ana River. City officials envision a residential and entertainment center with more than 9,000 homes and 7 million square feet of offices and stores, including 11 high rises.

    The first project, the 400-unit Stadium Lofts condominiums, is expected to open in two months.

    Preliminary drawings show the transit center parking structure encroaching on land owned by JT Schmid's Restaurant & Brewery, a popular hangout across from the Pond. With the transit center and professional football and basketball franchises being talked about for Anaheim, owner Jason Schmid has a lot at stake.

    "We're basically on the corner of Main Street and Main Street," he said. "And we're the window to the transit center."

    Pringle is looking to private investors who would foot the station's cost — estimated two years ago at $145 million — or to develop the adjacent retail and commercial space.

    "We can't wait around for federal dollars from Washington because that money may not come," Pringle said. "The city has talked about this for 15 years. This action is a dream turning into reality."

    With an estimated 20.6 million visitors to Anaheim spending $4.7 billion in Orange County last year, finding a private developer won't be difficult, said Lucy Dunn, chief executive for the Orange County Business Council.

    "If there's a market and they see that there's a need, the business community will step up," Dunn said. "A market-driven solution makes sense."

    Preliminary plans call for a 20,000-square-foot Metrolink station, 1,000 parking spaces, a pedestrian underpass and pedestrian plaza. The second phase will add 2,000 additional parking spaces, a high-speed rail station and a pedestrian bridge linking the station to the Pond.

    The city has won a spot on the proposed route of the California High Speed Rail system between San Diego and Sacramento, but money to build the system has hit a snag. Lawmakers in June removed from the ballot a $10-billion bond proposal for high-speed rail construction. The proposal is now slated for the 2008 election.

    Pringle also is on a commission of California and Nevada officials studying a 270-mile high-speed train linking Las Vegas and Ontario International Airport. Pringle is pushing to extend the route to Anaheim. The so-called Maglev train could ferry passengers at more than 250 mph from Anaheim to Ontario in 15 minutes.

    But Anaheim's transportation center is needed regardless of whether projects such as Maglev get built, experts say.

    "It's a way to pursue a risky project like Maglev or California high-speed rail … by building infrastructure investments that are also sensible for much less risky projects like increasing Metrolink ridership," said Marlon Boarnet, chairman of UC Irvine's department of planning, policy and design.

    Anaheim's plans also fit into the region's transportation needs, said Art Leahy, the OCTA's chief executive. With LAX congested and a cap on growth at John Wayne Airport, flights at Ontario International Airport are expected to increase as the region continues to grow, he said.

    "We buy this land and we preserve the future use," Leahy said. "We're preserving room for the extension up to Ontario airport. If [Maglev] doesn't happen, we change direction. But once we lose the opportunity, we can never get back there."

  2. #167

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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-redline19sep19,0,7328539.story?coll=la-home-headlines

    In Reversal, Waxman Seeks to Repeal Ban on Red Line Tunneling

    In a boost for Red Line extension, Rep. Henry Waxman leads a campaign to reverse his 1985 measure. But many obstacles remain.
    By Noam N. Levey
    LA Times Staff Writer

    September 19, 2006

    WASHINGTON — Two decades after the federal government effectively blocked construction of a subway to Los Angeles' Westside, Congress is on the verge of clearing a major obstacle to the long-deferred project.

    At the urging of Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles), the House is expected Wednesday to repeal a ban on tunneling through West Los Angeles, a key step in Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's drive to bring the Red Line from its current Mid-Wilshire terminus to the sea.

    Senate approval is expected soon afterward.

    "The progress of Mr. Waxman's legislation is great news for Los Angeles," the mayor said in a statement Monday, adding that it would "allow the city to renew its partnership with the federal government to reduce traffic congestion."

    The 13.2-mile extension, which transit officials estimate would cost at least $4.8 billion, is still years away.

    And even with a congressional blessing, the project faces many more obstacles, not the least of which is the difficult and politically delicate task of raising money for the project.

    But Waxman's push to repeal a ban he championed after a 1985 subterranean methane explosion in the city's Fairfax neighborhood further fuels the campaign to revive the city's most ambitious public transit line.

    A few years ago, that campaign seemed all but dead.

    Cost overruns, massive disruptions and construction defects in the 1990s sapped public support for subway construction in Los Angeles County.

    In 1998, county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky seized on public anger to push a ban on the use of local sales tax money for further tunneling, limiting the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's ability to extend the Red Line to the west.

    But increased traffic through the Westside has rekindled support for a subway. West Hollywood and Beverly Hills, once leery of a connection to the region's public transit system, now support the project.

    And during the 2005 mayoral campaign, Villaraigosa made the Red Line a central part of his expansive vision for modernizing Los Angeles....

    His efforts will get a boost if voters approve a massive state infrastructure bond measure this fall that could make as much as $1 billion available for the Red Line extension.

    But the mayor — whose administration has been focused for months on his school district control efforts — continues to face big obstacles to making his subway dream a reality.

    In Los Angeles, other local politicians support building transit lines that would almost certainly cost a fraction of the subway.

    A mile of subway can cost 10 times as much as a mile of light-rail line.

    The mayor is already contending with irritated county Supervisors Mike Antonovich, who wants to extend the Gold Line into the San Gabriel Valley, and Gloria Molina, who has criticized the mayor for his aggressive Red Line campaign.

    Molina, who heads the MTA board, has been a longtime champion of the Gold Line extension into Los Angeles' Eastside, which is part of her district.

    The five county supervisors have permanent seats on the MTA board.

    Bus rider advocates are leading the opposition. "It's going to be a $5-billion hole in the ground that's going to bankrupt the bus system," said Manuel Criollo, a spokesman for the Bus Riders Union.

    He wants transit officials to buy and operate 1,000 more buses instead of pumping billions of dollars into a subway extension.

    The Red Line project faces additional challenges in Washington, where the region's congressional delegation is also split over which rail lines should be built first.

    Additionally, other Los Angeles projects are further along in getting federal funding.

    The Eastside Gold Line extension, which is underway, is already receiving money from Washington.

    And MTA officials are working to secure federal money for the Exposition Line, which is to be built from Exposition Park to Culver City and, officials hope, ultimately to Santa Monica.

    During a visit to Capitol Hill last week, Villaraigosa downplayed the remaining challenges, noting the many years it took former Mayor Tom Bradley to begin construction of the subway.

    "Tom Bradley didn't get a subway built in his first term," Villaraigosa said.

  3. #168

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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Congress may lift L.A. subway curbsWestern extension of line could lose another barrierBY LISA FRIEDMAN, Washington Bureau
    LA Daily NewsWASHINGTON - After 20 years, Congress is about to declare it safe for Los Angeles to build a subway to the sea.
    A bill by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, set for a House vote Wednesday, would repeal a two-decades-old ban that Waxman himself authored prohibiting the use of federal dollars to tunnel through the Wilshire corridor. The measure's passage would pave the way for Washington to help fund Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's almost $5 billion transit vision of a 15-mile Metro Red Line extension from Wilshire Center to the Pacific Ocean.
    "This is good news," said Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, whose district is divided by Wilshire Boulevard. "If it is approved and signed by the president, it would resurrect the option of using federal funds. We will be able to talk credibly about extending the Red Line for the first time in 20 years."
    Waxman's bill has the strong support of Rep. David Dreier, R-Glendora, and is expected to easily pass the House.
    Meanwhile, Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Monday called the repeal "long overdue" and said she will work to have it put to a Senate vote as soon as possible.
    With only three weeks left in the legislative session, however, it remains unclear if the bill can be signed into law this year.
    Building the so-called subway to the sea has emerged as one of Villaraigosa's top transit priorities. The mayor said Monday he met with Waxman last week during a lobbying trip to Washington and he expects the bill will be successful when it comes before Congress.
    The decades-old plan essentially withered when a methane explosion in 1985 raised serious concerns about safety, and Waxman pushed through legislation banning the use of federal funds for tunneling projects in the Fairfax area. He reversed his position in 2005 after a five-member panel of experts issued a report declaring that advancements in construction technology now made tunneling safe.
    Cost, however, remains a major issue for some members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, who also sit on the Metropolitan Transportation Authority board.
    Construction on the subway is projected to last 15 years and cost about $300 million per mile, totaling $3.9 billion. Adjusted for inflation, the final cost would be about $4.8 billion.
    "The future of commuter rail is not underground," said Tony Bell, spokesman for Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich. "It's too expensive and it's too disruptive to our communities."
    Arguing that Waxman's bill will take crucial federal dollars away from other projects - connecting San Bernardino and Ventura counties, for example - Bell said Santa Monica, Beverly Hills and L.A. should find a way to fund a subway on their own.
    The almost 90 other cities and 134 unincorporated communities that would be affected by the subway, he said, "have no interest in a drain to the sea."
    Waxman said he also is mindful of the cost but maintained the subway is necessary to relieve traffic congestion along the heavily traveled corridor.
    "I know it is a very high priority for Mayor Villaraigosa. It is an essential part of the plan he has to alleviate traffic problems," Waxman said. "I don't want a bill that was passed 20 years ago to stand in the way."
    MTA spokesman Mark Littman said the board this summer approved hiring planning staff to examine the possibility of a Red Line extension. But no votes on actually funding the subway work will come until next year, he said.
    While MTA officials have given no estimate on how many people would ride the subway, Littman projected it would become one of the region's most popular lines.
    "Based on our bus experience, we know we'll carry a lot of people out there," he said. While supporters of the Red Line extension also are banking on getting money from the state infrastructure bond measure on the Nov. 7 ballot, Littman said the ability to obtain matching funds from Washington is crucial. The federal government chipped in about $2 billion for the original Red Line work - nearly half the cost of that project, he said. "Lifting this prohibition would be a major boost to the project," he said.

  4. #169

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    Exclamation Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    What if there were a non stop train from Anaheim to L.A.'s Union Station that traveled at 125 mph and made the one way trip in 15 minutes?

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-highspeed19sep19,0,3298729.story?coll=la-home-headlines

    O.C. Moves Toward High-Speed-Rail Service to L.A.

    A $7-million study would look at the feasibility of such a route, part of a proposed 700-mile corridor.
    By David Reyes
    Times Staff Writer

    September 19, 2006

    High-speed rail has long been a dream — a fantasy, some would say — of mass-transportation enthusiasts in Southern California. But on Monday, planners in Orange County decided to take a $7-million step toward making such travel between Los Angeles and O.C. a reality.

    The money would pay for preliminary engineering and environmental work to find out whether it's feasible to use the existing train corridor for an added electrified track to whisk passengers from Los Angeles' Union Station to Anaheim in as little as 15 minutes.

    "This approval ensures that if funds become available to build the system, we will have an L.A.-to-Orange County route," said Anaheim Mayor Curt Pringle.

    A transit committee will recommend the funding at Monday's Orange County Transportation Authority board meeting. The board is expected to approve it.

    A statewide bond initiative to build a network of high-speed-rail lines had been planned for the November election but was removed from the ballot. The measure, which seeks nearly $10 billion, is now expected to be voted on in 2008.

    The 700-mile high-speed-train system is planned to serve the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, Los Angeles, the Inland Empire, Orange County and San Diego.

    High-speed rail has been in use in Japan for decades. But it has met with mixed results in the United States.

    The heavily promoted system serving Washington, D.C., New York and Boston has suffered numerous stoppages because of alleged design flaws that landed Amtrak and the manufacturer of its Acela Express train in court. Service has resumed, but only on a limited basis.

    In California, when the concept was introduced, the proposed route was just Los Angeles to San Francisco, said Paul C. Taylor, executive director of development for the transportation authority.

    "By putting $7 million on the table, we will help jump-start the Los Angeles-to-Anaheim route," Taylor said.

    To date, only the San Francisco Bay Area has approved preliminary rail studies, said a California High Speed Rail Authority spokesman.

    "Assuming voters approve the bond, we're looking at improvements to the corridor in five to six years," said Mehdi Morshed, the rail authority's executive director in Sacramento. "The train won't be running for another 10 to 12 years."

    The train system would use the existing corridor, but — because trains would go much faster — alignments, right of way, improved grade crossings and other factors must be studied, Morshed said.

    The fastest speed for a Metrolink train is 79 mph. But high-speed trains could reach 125 mph going into Los Angeles, Taylor said.

    "It will be a short trip, maybe taking only 15 minutes, because you don't have any stops," said Pringle, who is also an OCTA board member representing Anaheim.

    Anaheim, which recently partnered with OCTA and acquired a 13 1/2 -acre property near Angel Stadium for a major transportation hub, has the most to gain from high-speed rail.

    The city recently announced plans to build one of the largest transit centers in Southern California, which would include a 20,000-square-foot Metrolink station, 1,000 parking spaces, a pedestrian underpass and pedestrian plaza. The second phase will add 2,000 parking spaces, a high-speed-rail station and a pedestrian bridge linking the station to the Arrowhead Pond.

    Metrolink serves a total of more than 5,000 daily commuters in Orange County, a Metrolink spokeswoman said. Ridership for August was up 6% from last year, the spokeswoman said.

    "We believe that many people want to and will commute from Anaheim to Los Angeles," Pringle said.

  5. #170

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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    House approves 'subway to the sea' bill
    BY LISA FRIEDMAN, Washington Bureau

    WASHINGTON - The House of Representatives lifted a major barrier to Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's "subway to the sea," today, ending a longstanding prohibition against using federal funds to tunnel along the Wilshire Boulevard corridor.
    The bill by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, passed unanimously on a voice vote.
    The measure, which must pass the Senate before it is signed into law, does not guarantee any money for the project. But repealing the ban that Waxman himself helped impose in 1985 gives the subway project a fair shot at winning Washington backing. "This project moves us further in the direction of advancing the cause of transit in our national transportation intermodal system," said Rep. David Oberstar, the leading Democrat on the House Transportation Committee.

    ________________________________________________


    Article Last Updated: 09/20/2006 09:29:33 PM PDT
    L.A. subway bill powers past House
    Senate to vote after Nov. 7
    LA Daily News
    BY LISA FRIEDMAN, Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - A major barrier to Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's vision of a subway to the sea began falling Wednesday when Congress moved to end a 21-year ban on using federal money to tunnel under Wilshire Boulevard.
    The House passed the bill by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, on a unanimous voice vote. The measure needs Senate approval before it can be signed into law, and it does not guarantee any money for the project.
    But repealing the ban that Waxman helped impose in 1985 would give the project a chance for federal funding.
    "This is the first step, a small step. But you all know that without that we wouldn't able to get the federal dollars that we need," Villaraigosa said.
    "This effort was the single biggest priority in the '80s because everybody knew it was the line that would get us the most bang for the buck. It would move more people than any other line in the United States of America."
    Matt Szabo, a spokesman for the mayor, said Villaraigosa has made no specific legislative requests but is working to secure about $5 billion in state, local and federal funds for the 15-mile subway extension between Wilshire Center and Santa Monica.
    California Sen. Dianne Feinstein is expected to help bring the bill to a Senate vote. While only a few days remain in the legislative session, there will be venues for the bill to pass when Congress returns after the midterm elections in November.
    In the House, Waxman's bill and the subway plan were hailed by transportation leaders.
    "This project moves us further in the direction of advancing the cause of transit in our national transportation inter-modal system," said Rep. David Oberstar, the leading Democrat on the House Transportation Committee.
    "It will make an enormous contribution" in Los Angeles, Oberstar predicted.
    Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., also a leading member of the transportation panel, said passage of Waxman's bill means more comprehensive transit planning can take place in Los Angeles.
    Still, the subway to the sea received mixed reviews.
    Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Sherman Oaks, said he favors lifting the ban on federal funds, but believes an Orange Line extension to Chatsworth and other local projects deserve to be a higher regional priority.
    "Just GetAd('tile','box','/news_article','','www.dailynews.com','','null','nu ll');*
    because it's not prohibited doesn't mean it has to be the very next priority for our region. It would be a great thing to have. It also would be a very expensive thing," he said.
    Sherman also said any subway extension would "beg for" the creation of a line between Wilshire and Van Nuys.
    The subway to the sea had been a long-standing transit dream that essentially died in a methane explosion during construction of the Red Line in the Fairfax District in 1985.
    The blast prompted Waxman to insert language into a funding bill that prohibited the future use of federal funds to tunnel under the Wilshire corridor. He reversed his position in 2005 after a five-member panel of experts declared that advancements in construction technology now make it safe to tunnel.
    But Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich criticized the proposal.
    "This $5 billion boondoggle is a drain to the sea that would cripple the regional transportation needs of the county's other ... cities and the 1.5 million taxpayers who reside in unincorporated communities," Antonovich said in a printed statement.
    He called instead for a Gold Line extension to Claremont, an Eastside extension to Whittier, an Orange Line extension to the Gold Line in Pasadena and other Metropolitan Transportation Authority projects. "The public who voted against subway funding remember the disruption caused by construction of the current $5 billion, 17-mile subway and how it paralyzed the implementation of a regional transportation system," he said. Staff Writer Kerry Cavanaugh contributed to this report.

  6. #171

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    Wink Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    What if there were a non stop train from Anaheim to L.A.'s Union Station that traveled at 125 mph and made the one way trip in 15 minutes?

    [It will] whisk passengers from Los Angeles' Union Station to Anaheim in as little as 15 minutes.The fastest speed for a Metrolink train is 79 mph. But high-speed trains could reach 125 mph going into Los Angeles...

    "It will be a short trip, maybe taking only 15 minutes, because you don't have any stops," said Pringle, who is also an OCTA board member representing Anaheim...

    Hmmm...... exciting.

  7. #172

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    when....When....WHEN?!
    What time is the 3 o'clock parade?




    http://www.myspace.com/pduliere

  8. #173

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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Well, it seems the only news lately on Southern California's mass transit system is from Irvine, Orange County:

    Irvine Wants to Hitch a Ride

    City officials will study monorail, streetcar, trolley and bus systems to see which to pursue.

    By David Reyes
    LA Times

    October 8, 2006

    Portland, Ore., has its light rail shuttling riders into downtown, and Las Vegas has its monorail. Will Irvine be next to shuttle people in high-tech style to shop and dine at the Spectrum or visit the Orange County Great Park?

    "We need a monorail or something like that," said Richard Ruszat, a lawyer from Irvine who rides Metrolink daily to and from work in Los Angeles. "With a monorail, it's elevated and lets you go up top and ride high and see how beautiful the city is," he said one recent afternoon at the Irvine train station.

    This week, city transportation officials will examine what intracity transit system — monorail, trolley, streetcar, and yes, bus — the city should pursue. The study, largely gauging the sentiments of residents, will take nine months.

    "There is no preferred type of transportation," said Rick Sandzimier, Irvine's director of development.

    "This is a blank canvas."

    A team of consultants has been hired by the city to hold public meetings, seek ideas and provide recommendations to the City Council by June.

    While the final route is uncertain, one possible path would be to have it depart the city's train station for the Spectrum office and retail area, return, and then head to the Great Park, a distance of at least four miles.

    Irvine has prided itself as a "visionary city," according to its website, one that touts its "top-rated educational opportunities and unrivaled quality of living."

    In 2003, Money Magazine ranked Irvine the fifth "Hottest Town" on the West Coast for populations over 100,000. In addition, the U.S. Census Bureau ranked Irvine the nation's sixth-fastest-growing city among those with populations over 100,000.

    The mode of transportation the city selects will have a bearing on its image. Metrolink riders, who might use the new system to get to work or visit the park, said during a recent city meeting that they hoped the city would select something "sexy" such as a monorail, rather than a bus, even if it uses alternative fuel.

    Irvine has a $120-million allocation from a 1990 statewide transit initiative that it has not tapped, though it must provide matching funds, city officials said.

    The money is earmarked for "anything elevated or on a fixed track like a specific lane," said Marty Bryant, the city's public works director.

    That could be a bus, Bryant said, but it also might be personal electric vehicles carrying as many as four passengers and their luggage on an elevated track similar to Disneyland's Autopia cars.

    Once a recommendation is made, the city wants to begin whatever construction is needed in 2010 and finish in two years.

    Metrolink and Amtrak riders who attended a recent city meeting at the Irvine station said they like a high-tech choice that uses electricity.

    "As long as it's clean and it doesn't pollute," said Lito Villamayor, 51, a business executive who lives in Poway.

    Villamayor, who was in Irvine for a business meeting, described himself as a "committed" rail rider: "I will never drive again."

    If Irvine builds an elevated transit system, he said, he intends to bring his family to the Great Park, once the job of transforming the old El Toro Marine base is completed.

    Not all riders were enthusiastic about the city's plans. Said Javier Estrada, 31, of San Bernardino, who works in Irvine as a microbiologist: "Come on weekends to visit the Spectrum or the park? I don't think so. I'll stay in San Bernardino."

    With the annexation of the former Marine base in 2003, the city became the county's largest in area. The property was slated for years to be a commercial airport until Orange County voters killed that plan in March 2002.

    The park is part of a 3,700-acre development by national home builder Lennar Corp. that will include 3,400 homes and millions of square feet of commercial buildings.

    Lennar bought the base, which closed in 1999, for $649.5 million from the U.S. Navy in 2005. It is donating the parkland to Irvine.

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    "That could be a bus, Bryant said, but it also might be personal electric vehicles carrying as many as four passengers and their luggage on an elevated track similar to Disneyland's Autopia cars."
    I never knew Autopia went on an elevated track.!

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    Cool Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    That could be a bus, Bryant said, but it also might be personal electric vehicles carrying as many as four passengers and their luggage on an elevated track similar to Disneyland's Autopia cars.
    I think they must be confusing autopia cars with monorails...

    The Chevron Corporation would be a little upset if the Disneyland Autopia was really ELECTRIC considering they've been supplying Autopia gasoline for years now!

  11. #176

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Or, don't say it, the return of the PEOPLE MOVER ? ? ?

    Maybe the writer/editor had someone check the name of the ride and couldn't find it on Disneyland.com so they picked something like what the writer was describing. Hmmm......

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    A few years ago (before DCA), when my Dad (the only licensed driver in the house) couldn't take us, we would go on the bus. The bus would take us right next to the DL Hotel, and from there we would buy our admission ticket at the Monorail station. I always thought that was a cool way to get into the park, especially because there were really no lines at the ticket window.

    I know that the Monorail is currently closed, but I am certain that there is a combination of rail and bus transportation to get there.


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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    The MTA is now free of the 'consent decree' meaning it can spend more on rail projects and enjoy its one billion plus dollar investment in natural gas powered buses... which turned the agency around from being ranked one of the worst to the best in the nation....

    Court lifts MTA restraints
    Critics fear action could bring fare hikes and service cuts by agency
    BY RACHEL URANGA, Staff Writer
    Article Last Updated:10/25/2006 09:04:35 PM PDT

    Paving the way for sweeping changes at the MTA, a federal judge on Wednesday rejected efforts to extend a decade-old consent decree that forced the agency to invest $1.3 billion in bus service for the urban poor.

    In a major victory for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, U.S. District Court Judge Terry Hatter ruled that the agency had taken all "reasonable steps" to improve the bus system for poor minorities by easing crowding, extending service and adding hundreds of buses.

    The decree should expire Sunday as planned, Hatter said. The ruling set the stage for a massive reorganization of Metro bus lines, with the agency no longer bound by protracted and costly negotiations required for service changes.

    "It's good news for our riders," said Roger Snoble, the MTA's chief executive officer. "They have benefited from the consent decree. We have got a good system. Now, to make it better, we can do so without having to go through the court."

    Hatter noted he will continue to monitor implementation of a four-year plan to extend bus service, including adding more than two dozen Rapid lines and service to job and medical hubs.

    But activists fear that the decree's end could portend fare hikes and service cuts at the country's third-largest transit agency.

    The MTA has plans to reorganize bus routes over the next two years, but has released scant details. The agency has not specifically called for fare hikes, but has stressed that bus services are straining its budget.

    "While this may be a technical victory for the Los Angeles MTA, it is a grave threat to the civil rights of 450,000 Los Angeles bus riders," the Bus Riders Union said in a prepared statement. The union's 1994 civil-rights lawsuit had prompted the decree.

    "MTA buses continue to be unacceptably overcrowded, evening and weekend service is unbearable, and for the past two years in particular, the MTA has been in a mode of defiance, allowing conditions on the buses to deteriorate, hoping for the expiration of the decree," the union said.

    The MTA runs nearly 200 lines that crisscross 1,433 square miles, from the beaches to the San Fernando Valley.

    Since the decree was brokered in 1996, the agency has spent more than $1 billion to replace more than 2,000 buses and expand hours and lines.

    "I want to reassure Metro's customers - and the public at large - that Metro is committed to sustaining the improvements made to the bus system," said county Supervisor Gloria Molina, chairwoman of the MTA's board. "We're not about to lower our standards. Nobody at Metro wants to turn back the clock and undo all the progress we have made."

    In his decision, Hatter noted that the decree, which had provided specific orders that sometimes generated controversy, was flawed.

    "For the past 10 years - the entire term of the consent decree - the parties have disagreed as to how to implement the consent decree, how to reach its objectives and how to measure its success.

    "In hindsight, the consent decree was a less than perfect document," "As a result, it is impossible to achieve absolute compliance.

    "However, it was possible for MTA to substantially comply with the consent decree. Despite an increasing ridership, increasing traffic congestion and fiscal constraints, the MTA has substantially complied with the consent decree while maintaining fares at reasonable levels."

    Most contentious under the decree were requirements to ease crowding. The riders union continually pressed the MTA to add more buses, saying passengers on some of the most heavily used lines were forced to stand. That violated "load factors" set by the court that prohibited leaving eight riders without a seat for 20 minutes or longer.

    Throughout the decade, the MTA contested the union's interpretation of the data - at times vociferously - and most recently declared that monitored buses were crowded just 1 percent of the time.

    At stake, MTA officials have said, is the financial health of the system. They repeatedly complained that specific consent-decree orders prevented the financially strapped agency from cutting redundant and unnecessary lines.

    "One of the things that is most disheartening in living with the consent decree is the limits it has placed on the administration to make timely decisions on routing and service," said county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, an MTA board member.

    At the root of the decree is a 1994 lawsuit filed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Bus Riders Union. The suit alleged that the MTA discriminated against poor and minority bus riders by neglecting the bus system while pouring money into light rail and subways.

    At the time the suit was filed, the agency was embarking on a massive rail project and seeking to hike fares and cut monthly bus passes. Buses frequently ran late, broke down and spewed choke-inducing fumes.

    "The MTA has never stopped struggling with the fact that there is a lot of political mileage to address problems like traffic congestion and air pollution and not focus on being a redistributive social service for the poor," said Brian Taylor, director of the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies. "The focus on transit-dependent has been increased by this case, and the MTA has felt hamstrung by it."

    Special Master Donald Bliss, who oversaw implementation of the decree before retiring earlier this year, said he was satisfied with Hatter's decision.

    "The MTA has invested substantial resources in the improvement of the bus system," he said. "I agree that the parties should work together to implement the new service plan and continue to provide transportation for the entire community."

    The Bus Riders Union has 30 days to appeal. An attorney for the union said it was still weighing options. But, he warned, any significant cuts to service would be challenged.

    "If they gut the bus system, we will be back in court asking for an extension to the decree after the fact," said Richard Larson, an attorney for the NAACP and the union.

    While the union expressed dismay with the ruling, others admitted the strides made over the past decade have vastly changed transportation in L.A.

    "The Bus Riders Union should be very proud," said civil-rights attorney Connie Rice, who argued the case for the union. "Fares didn't go up, the blind and disabled kept their fare base. And the decree put $1.7 billion in the bus system that wouldn't have been there without it."

    (article continues at LA Daily news website.)

  14. #179

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    Post Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    http://www.anaheim.net/article.asp?id=609#artic

    Take a look at the newly approved ARTIC - Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center on the Anaheim City website, including drawings of the proposed facility that show high speed maglev trains on 'monorail' beams.

    "ARTIC will unite different forms of transit into one station ARTIC is to be a showcase facility of modern transit modes, providing everything from conventional bus service to magnetically-levitated trains, to serve commuters, tourists, and all. With its central Orange County location between the I-5 and SR-57 freeways, ARTIC would be the major transportation center, and will serve as a magnet for new housing development and economic growth for the City of Anaheim." -- City website

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    Re: Mass Transit to Disneyland Resort

    Cool! Wish they showed a timeline though.

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