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  1. #316

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by twobluestripes View Post
    my first time on this thread, and i'm loving today's tips!

    ETA: okay, i read a page back and i am SERIOUSLY loving this thread. your photos are so beautiful straight from your camera. i actually let out an audible gasp when i saw the one of the horse...
    i'm thinking it's time for me to get back into photography!
    WELCOME!
    Glad to have you and THANKS!!!
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  2. #317

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    From a sheer "photographic" standpoint, it is just easier and better to take the picture when the light is most optimal. Better to let the camera do the work right the first time than you do it in the computer later.
    Truer words never spoken, however today's digital cameras still do not capture images the way film stock of years past did, worse still are cell phones.

    I'm thankful for programs like Photoshop for helping me salvage mediocre photos into something that is more pleasant to the eye.

  3. #318

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Hmmm. Certainly cell phones have been, in the past, low quality. I also agree with the advice.

    I will say, however, that digital tech - and the cameras in cell phones - are getting better all the time. HDR and such things are also a nice option if you don't have the opportunity to wait for the perfect lighting.

    I do appreciate the photographers in this thread, however, that do take the time and use nice equipment!

  4. #319

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Digital camera's have come a long way, but at the same time more and more people are ditching them in favor of cell phones.

    The sad part is that more and more images are being captured, but they are worse that the old simple family snapshot.

    It's really nice to see a thread like this, to at least plant the idea that with a little effort and a good eye, any one can elevate the quality of their photos

  5. #320

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Hello there all! I shall be filling in for HotSauce1 today as he had a prior obligation.

    It is a lucky accident he had been recently discussing lighting and the sun positions in Anaheim/DL, since what I had in mind is influenced by this as well: photographing objects behind glass and in windows.

    Main Street is the worst offender, in this regard, and can be very tricky to get a seemingly straightforward shot depending on the time of day. No matter what basically, at most times, if you take a head-on shot of a window on MS you'll wind up with something like this:



    That is even a fairly decent image, considered..you can see some of the contents within, but a good amount of background is reflected and that can be distracting.

    Now, on a case by case basis, this can work out fine, depending on the ratio of reflection vs. dark areas, evidenced by these photos:







    At night, if the display is well-lit and depending on location, shooting head on can work fine:



    Now, let's discuss a few techniques or strategies for working with the assumption at some point you'll want a photo of something in a shop window or glass case.

    1) FLASH

    This is my personal least favorite, and not always works, for the obvious reason of reflecting light right back at you and causing a image of the area behind you, or an unpleasant glare. If you are going to try this method, stand at an angle or looking up at the object to be photographed, not head on.





    2) Angles/Side Shooting

    I would recommend trying this one, if at all possible, the most. As observed with the flash tip, you can get in at times away from the source of the light coming directly from the front and just capture it's results.







    3) Close-Ups/Blocking Light

    If concentrating on a relatively small area or object, perhaps the best thing to do is just get directly in front of the window so your shadow blocks out a swath of objects or space, and press camera as close as can to the glass. It is somewhat awkward to do, but can be the only way in some situations to get images such as these:





    I do hope this post has been helpful and given some ideas to get around the reflections/glare issues so prevalent in trying to shoot through glass. Thank you all for reading, and HotSauce1 will be back as scheduled tomorrow to continue lessons
    when the spooks have a midnight jamboree....

  6. #321

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Great tips!

  7. #322

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Thanks, Regions Beyond! Great ideas to try!

  8. #323

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    9-6-10
    As I mentioned on Saturday’s post, today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is about the Golden Hour.

    The “Golden Hour”, also known as the “Magic Hour” is the first and last hour of sunlight during the day. Since Disneyland isn’t open at sunrise, we won’t need to discuss that part of it here and will simply focus on the last hour of sunlight during the day.

    During the last hour of sunlight, the sun is near the horizon and travels through more of the atmosphere, reducing the intensity of the light. The atmosphere also scatters more of the blue light and makes the light from the sun appear more reddish in color. The sun's small angle with the horizon creates longer shadows which can create more striking photographs.

    The word “Hour” is used somewhat loosely and depends upon time of year and how far you are from the equator. The closer you are to the equator, the shorter the golden hour is. The farther from the equator, the longer it lasts. In Alaska, you can have a Golden Hour that lasts for several hours.

    From my experience, the Golden Hour at Disneyland typically lasts about 45 minutes with the best part of it lasting about 15-20 minutes. With a time frame that short, you really need to know what you want to photograph and be there to take advantage of the light. It doesn’t leave enough time to take a picture in DCA and then run to Disneyland to shoot something there, thus requiring repeat visits to photograph different things during that time. (repeat visits, what a pity)

    Because the contrast is less during the Golden Hour, shadows aren’t as dark, highlights aren’t as likely to be overexposed and the warm color of the sun can dramatically enhance the colors of the scene. It is the perfect time for Landscape photography and can make beautiful portraits of your loved ones if positioned correctly in the light.

    In Disneyland and DCA, you don’t have any locations to see the actual sunset, so you only need to think about photographing objects that face west. If the object is facing east such as Splash Mountain, the sun will be behind it (Backlighting) and the object will be in shadows, which won’t take advantage of the beautiful light.

    Camera setting Tip: The “Cloudy” or “Auto White Balance” is the setting you want to use.

    Here are some photos taken during the Golden Hour that show the effect of the warmer light and shadows it creates.

    This shot of Toad Hall was taken on 6-29-10 at 6:36 pm. You can see how the showdow from the weather vane is almost straight behind the vane because of the angle of the sun. This was at the very beginning of the Golden Hour.


    This shot taken 30 minutes later shows a much redder and more romatic color of light on Mr. Toad and the brick wall.


    This shot in Toontown shows how the warmer colors can change the feel of the scene.


    This photo of the Hollywood Pictures Backlot sign shows a very golden hue to the textures and colors of the area.


    This shot of California Screamin shows how the sunset created a beautiful lighting effect on the structure of the coaster.


    In this shot of the Tower of Terror, taken just a few minutes after the one above, notice the colors on the building and how it doesn't have any shadows from its own structure.


    After those shots, I literally ran over to Grizzly River Rapids to get these pictures. As you can see, this was in the last minute of sunset because only the top of the peak is lit by sunlight and the rest of the picture has a much cooler color tone to it.


    This shot was taken about 1 minute later as the sun had already dropped below the horizon and you can see how the colors are greyer and cooler in such a short time.


    So the next time you are in Disneyland and the Golden Hour approaches, think about what would make a dramatic photograph by the changing light and be ready to capture it.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2010
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  9. #324

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by sailerm View Post
    Truer words never spoken, however today's digital cameras still do not capture images the way film stock of years past did, worse still are cell phones.

    I'm thankful for programs like Photoshop for helping me salvage mediocre photos into something that is more pleasant to the eye.
    Truer words never spoken about Photoshop as well. It has helped me turn trash into treasure many, many times.

    I actually got to take my first pictures with a cell phone yesterday. It was a friends phone who asked me to photograph some birds with it. I don't know how they turned out once put into the computer, but they did look pretty good in the phone. It was also during mid daylight, so I'm sure that helps quite a bit.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  10. #325

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Chanfan View Post
    Hmmm. Certainly cell phones have been, in the past, low quality. I also agree with the advice.

    I will say, however, that digital tech - and the cameras in cell phones - are getting better all the time. HDR and such things are also a nice option if you don't have the opportunity to wait for the perfect lighting.

    I do appreciate the photographers in this thread, however, that do take the time and use nice equipment!
    Very, very true. Camera phones are definitely getting better every day. My sister, who has much better camera equipment than I do, absolutely loves her camera phone. I have no doubt that in a few years, camera phones will be as good as some DSLR's. My guess is that the biggest problem with photos taken with camera phones, isn't the camera as much as it is the way the person is taking the photo. Most people hold them so far away from their body that their arms or hands move when taking the shot and the pictures are almost always blurry.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  11. #326

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Very good post re: the golden hour, quite useful info to have overall, and I was particularly impressed with the comparison photos showing the dramatic difference in light quality at Grizzly Peak in such a short span. Thank you, HotSauce1!
    when the spooks have a midnight jamboree....

  12. #327

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    9-7-10
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is one that I like to call Through the Looking Glass.

    Regions Beyond was kind enough to fill in for me on Sunday and beautifully covered some of the difficulties of shooting through glass. I had been planning to do a lesson on this myself, so I thought I would use this opportunity to reinforce and expand upon what he so eloquently discussed.


    The ever changing window displays on Main St. and elsewhere in the park are wonderful subjects to photograph but do pose some challenges. There are a few tips however that can overcome those obstacles.
    • Turn off your flash. It will only bounce off the glass and cause a flare.
    • Never photograph the window straight on and away from the glass.
    • Place the lens of the camera against the glass to eliminate outside reflections.
    • If using a DSLR, turn off the Auto Focus & use Manual Focus because light on the glass can confuse it and you don’t want it to bang against the window while trying to focus.
    • If possible shoot from the side of the window instead of the front.
    • If your subject can’t be shot straight through the glass, place the lens at an angle but still against the glass and use your other hand to block reflecting light.
    • Be wary of handprints on the glass so you don’t end up with a big smudge in your photo.
    Here are some examples of good and bad window photography.

    I took this one to show as an example of what happens when you stand in front of the window and don't put the lens against the glass.


    Here is the difference, simply by putting the lens against the glass.


    This was taken from one of the Main St. windows that has sides to it.


    This was taken by having the lens against the glass but at an angle and placing my left hand against the glass and lens to block the sunlight that was reflecting off it.


    There are times when you can use the reflections on the glass to add to the photo. In this shot taken by my wife, she intentionally positioned the reflection of the lights to look like a tiara on Minnie’s head.


    Using the glass to add to the photo can be very difficult but if done well, the results can be very dramatic. These photos taken by Andy Castro are some of my all time favorite pictures and are by far the best ones I’ve ever seen that show the window itself and look in beyond it.



    I sincerely hope Andy doesn’t mind me using them as an example, especially because it was his brilliant photography that inspired me to buy a DSLR and try so hard to improve my own skills. They are so warm and romantic that I almost don't want to show them because they are so much better than mine that they make me look bad.

    Depending upon the type of glass, you can also use it to take a unique picture like this one taken through the stained glass window in the Pinocchio queue.


    I hope these tips and examples make the challenge of shooting through glass a little less daunting and a lot more productive.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2010
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  13. #328

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Awesome tips as usual! Very intersesting photos. I will definitely be using these tips.
    If adventure has a name, it must be Indiana Jones ... and Disneyland

  14. #329

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyIndy7 View Post
    Awesome tips as usual! Very intersesting photos. I will definitely be using these tips.
    I hope it helps. If it works out for you, please post the pictures on here. I would love to see them.
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  15. #330

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Sauce 1 View Post
    9-6-10
    Golden Hour.

    The “Golden Hour”, also known as the “Magic Hour” is the first and last hour of sunlight during the day. Since Disneyland isn’t open at sunrise, we won’t need to discuss that part of it here and will simply focus on the last hour of sunlight during the day.
    I really like how well the last two pictures demonstrated the huge difference in the Golden Hour shot to a regular shot. It really brought home your point.

    Toad Hall pictures are gorgeous and rich! Wow!

    BTW, just out of curiosity, the sunrise Golden Hour, does it do the same thing with the redder tones or are there different tones that come with the Dawn?

    Thanks again for the great Tutorials!


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