Page 38 of 157 FirstFirst ... 28353637383940414888138 ... LastLast
Results 556 to 570 of 2354
  1. #556

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The beautiful Pacific NW, USA
    Posts
    156

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    As always, all your tips are awesome! Thank you so much for taking your time to share them with us!

    I'm especially interested in your "emotion" pictures. How do you know which emotion you will get by cropping it different ways? Is it possible on one shot to crop it in different ways and get different "emotions" out of the same picture?

  2. #557

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    My computer seems to have a major case of hemmoroids at the moment, so I will be a bit behind on today's post. (It won't let me open any of my photos.) Hopefully I will have one up later this evening.
    Just doing this note took about 10 minutes, so wish me luck.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  3. #558

    • Future Imagineer!!
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    a long way from DL in the Bay Area
    Posts
    3,691

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    While awaiting your new photo I just wanted to stop in and say I love all the tips and photos you post!!! Even the ones I more or less knew about are fun to read new variations on!! Thanks!


    Keeper of the Dynamite Goat on RCMC

  4. #559

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    10-21-10 "Sorry for the tardiness in which today's post is getting done. It's been a rough day."

    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is going to show you a quick and easy way to improve skin tone in portraits and give a soft healthy glow using the Noise Reduction tool in Photoscape.

    I know I’ve been doing quite a bit in Photoscape recently and the reason I am using it so much (other than the fact that it is quicker and easier than Photoshop Elements for basic photo editing) is because it is a Free Program that anyone can download and use and make all kinds of improvements to your photos. It doesn’t matter if you use a $100.00 Point & Shoot camera or a $5,000.00 DSLR. It uses Jpegs and works for any image. I’m also trying to keep these daily posts accessible and understandable to photo enthusiasts of all skill levels and budgets.

    I will start with this photo of Tinkerbell which I intentionally sharpened to make any skin flaws more noticeable for the sake of this post.



    I opened it up in the Editor tab in Photoscape.




    The first thing I want to do is crop it to get much closer to her beautiful face. I clicked on the Crop tab and Crop by Original Photo Ratio.




    Here is the photo after cropping.




    Next I used the little + sign magnifying glass right under the image and zoomed in on just her face. You can see that there are some specs of something on her face and a light reflection on her lower lip, so we will remove those first using the smallest size dot on the Clone Stamp Tool in the Tools tab.




    It’s hard to see in this photo but on her cheek you can see a small little circle. You move the cloning circle right next to the spot you want to cover up and click once. That will clone that little circle and put it over the spot you want to cover. Get as close as you can to the spot you are trying to fix so the skin tones match up or you end up with a perfect circle of a different color that looks worse than what was originally there. I repeated on all of the white specs and any blemishes I wanted to remove. I also did it on the bright spot that was on the edge of her lower lip.




    Here is the photo after using the Clone Stamp Tool.




    Next I zoomed back out using the – magnifying glass. Then I clicked on the Filter Tab – Noise Reduction (Clear Skin) – High.




    I zoomed back in to show you what the difference looks like. As you can see, there is a nice soft glow to the skin that looks as delicate and pretty as a rose petal.




    And, here is the final photo.


    So if you have any portrait shots that could use a little touch up on the skin tone (and lets face it, who doesn’t want better looking skin in their pictures), try the Noise Reduction tool in Photoscape. It’s quick, easy and can really make your photos shine.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2010
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  5. #560

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kangel View Post
    As always, all your tips are awesome! Thank you so much for taking your time to share them with us!

    I'm especially interested in your "emotion" pictures. How do you know which emotion you will get by cropping it different ways? Is it possible on one shot to crop it in different ways and get different "emotions" out of the same picture?
    That is an excellent question and also a somewhat difficult one to answer because it all depends upon the picture.

    I do say it is possible to change the emotion by cropping differently but only in certain instances. It would depend upon the background behind the subject. For instance if the subject is in the middle of the frame and the background is red on one side of it and blue on the other, it would completely change the feeling of the picture by leaving more of one color than the other. If there is more red, it will be more dramatic and have more impact. If there is more blue, it will have a calmer mood.

    If the subject of the photo takes up a major percentage of the image, it becomes more difficult to crop it in different ways.

    I've taken a picture of the Partners Statue where I had the entire statue and trees behind it in the frame. It was ok but was pretty boring. I cropped it to just just the statue and it was cute. Then I cropped it further to just part of Mickey's face and the two hands, then converted it to black & white and it was a different picture altogether. "Dramatically Different"





    I know this doesn't answer your question very well, but like I said, "It all depends upon the original photo and what is behind the main subject.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  6. #561

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by marenbobarren View Post
    while awaiting your new photo i just wanted to stop in and say i love all the tips and photos you post!!! Even the ones i more or less knew about are fun to read new variations on!! Thanks!
    thank you!!!
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  7. #562

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I forgot to mention that I am taking tomorrow off from a post to take my wife out on the town for her birthday. I will be back with a new post on Saturday.

    I am also curious...
    For the post about post processing techniques, do you prefer Videos or the Screen Capture type like the one above?

    I would love to know your preferences.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  8. #563

    • Junior Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    228

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I am loving this thread!! I've always wanted to get into photography, and feel I have a good eye for composition, but I certainly don't have any training on how to make pictures actually turn out how I see them in my head. This is amazing and I really appreciate all the work you put into it. Please don't stress yourself with trying to keep up a set schedule and staying up late into the night do get it done. I'm sure others will agree that we're just happy whenever there's a new post, and we'll keep checking frequently! And to answer your question, I like the screen shots personally, but I think either are fine. Whatever is easiest for you!

    Also, thanks for pointing out that Photoscape is free! I'm running an older version of Photoshop right now, and don't necessarily want to spend the $ to upgrade at this point. If Photoscape can do some of the newer stuff then I'd definitely rather try that first before upgrading!

    Thanks, thanks, thanks for being so willing to share your talent!!

  9. #564

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Pine Valley, CA
    Posts
    84

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    HotSauce i LOVE this thread. I am up to page 10, and realize I should just go back and take notes. I am a very amateur photographer using a p&s Canon Powershot SX120. I've had it about 8 months, and just now started fooling around with different settings. We'll be a DL on the 8th, so with some help from this thread, I'll hopefully be getting some awesome pics.

    and i'd like to co-sign anyone thanking you for Photoscape info. I had photoshop, but got a new computer, and cannot find the CD.

    Again, thanks!
    if i cant be a good example, let me be a horrible warning

  10. #565

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    263

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Sauce 1 View Post
    I am also curious...
    For the post about post processing techniques, do you prefer Videos or the Screen Capture type like the one above?
    Personally, I like your videos. I get more out of watching someone do something than just reading about it and seeing screen shots.

    Now, I got to get over to your site and order me up some of your hot sauce!
    Died in 1720 ya know...

    Checkout all my Disneyland photos
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5198394...7625048447449/

  11. #566

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by kcw View Post
    I am loving this thread!! I've always wanted to get into photography, and feel I have a good eye for composition, but I certainly don't have any training on how to make pictures actually turn out how I see them in my head. This is amazing and I really appreciate all the work you put into it. Please don't stress yourself with trying to keep up a set schedule and staying up late into the night do get it done. I'm sure others will agree that we're just happy whenever there's a new post, and we'll keep checking frequently! And to answer your question, I like the screen shots personally, but I think either are fine. Whatever is easiest for you!

    Also, thanks for pointing out that Photoscape is free! I'm running an older version of Photoshop right now, and don't necessarily want to spend the $ to upgrade at this point. If Photoscape can do some of the newer stuff then I'd definitely rather try that first before upgrading!

    Thanks, thanks, thanks for being so willing to share your talent!!
    THANK YOU! It is my pleasure. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. I think I am actually learning more doing this than I am passing on. Last night in particular I figured out a wonderful way of improving my fireworks shots that I will be passing on pretty soon.

    Thanks also for being understanding about the time this takes and if I can't do it every day.

    Quote Originally Posted by DebiDeb View Post
    HotSauce i LOVE this thread. I am up to page 10, and realize I should just go back and take notes. I am a very amateur photographer using a p&s Canon Powershot SX120. I've had it about 8 months, and just now started fooling around with different settings. We'll be a DL on the 8th, so with some help from this thread, I'll hopefully be getting some awesome pics.

    and i'd like to co-sign anyone thanking you for Photoscape info. I had photoshop, but got a new computer, and cannot find the CD.

    Again, thanks!
    I am a "very amateur photograper" as well. I am just fortunate enough to go to Disneyland about every 3 weeks or so and am obsessed with taking better pictures. This is forcing me to read all kinds of photography magazines, blogs, articles and whatever else I can find to learn from. It is also forcing me to learn more and more post processing techniques, which doesn't make me a better photographer, but it can improve some of my photographs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiki View Post
    Personally, I like your videos. I get more out of watching someone do something than just reading about it and seeing screen shots.

    Now, I got to get over to your site and order me up some of your hot sauce!
    Personally, I find videos easier to learn from too. I will try to keep a balance between the Screen Shot lessons and the Video lessons. The Screenshots are just much faster to do. A 5 minute video can take about 8 hours to do, whereas a screenshot lesson only takes about 2 hours depending upon how many steps there are. (I am also truly embarrased at how bad my videos are. Hopefully I can get better at doing them soon.) I guess it's like photography, practice, practice, practice.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  12. #567

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    10-23-10
    In “Today’s Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” we are going to learn how to Fix Overexposed and Underexposed pictures in Photoshop Elements.

    I know some of you are thinking “But you shoot in RAW, so you can just change the exposure in the RAW editor and don’t have to worry about it.” Yes, that is correct. However, my wife uses my old Point & Shoot camera which only takes jpegs, so this lesson is for the people who use Point & Shoots and don’t have the freedom and luxury of working with the RAW format.

    I will start with this image of a window display on Main St. As you can see it is a bit overexposed.


    I can always go into Photoscape and darken the image but doing that isn’t quite as effective and can be a bit more destructive to the quality of the original image than doing these steps in Photoshop Elements. This is even more important when it comes to fixing underexposed images. You can always brighten them with any photo editing software but that is usually pretty harsh and brightens every pixel evenly, including ones that don’t need it. The more you brighten an image with a “Brighten” tool, the more destructive it becomes.

    The first thing to do is open the image in Photoshop Elements and work in the EDIT FULL tab.



    Next we are going to go up to the Layer menu on the top and click on Duplicate Layer.



    That brings up this window for asking what you want to call the new layer. You can just leave it as Background Copy and click OK.


    Next, in the layers window to the bottom right of the screen, you can see the Background image and the newly created Background Copy that is what we are working on. Right above those layers is a Layers menu. Click on that menu and click on Multiply. This will darken the image a bit.




    As you can see in the photo above, it is a bit too dark for my liking. Right next to the Layers menu is one called Opacity. Click on the little triangle to the right of that and you will have a slider that allows you to control how dark that new layer is.


    I slid the slider to a 70% Opacity to brighten up the image just a touch.



    Once I am happy with the image, I go up to the Layer menu on the top of the screen and in its drop down, click on Flatten Image. This will combine the two layers into one and you have your final image.



    From there you just click on File – Save As and save the image as whatever you choose to call it.



    Here is our final image.



    Now we will use almost the exact same process to brighten up this Underexposed image.


    Open the image and stay in the Edit Full tab.



    This time we will do a little shortcut to making a Background Copy Layer. Simply place your cursor over the Background image and with a Right Click, click on Duplicate Layer.


    In the Layers Menu click on Screen. This will brighten up the image without being too harsh.



    I am happy with the amount on this one so I don’t need to go to the Opacity slider to make any changes. All I have to do is go back up to the Layer menu and click on Flatten Image, then save it the same as I did before.



    And, here is our final image.


    Note: If using Multiply or Screen didn’t give you enough brightening or darkening, you can Flatten the image, then create another Background Copy and do the same steps again and again as needed.

    I hope these quick tips help you in rescuing some images that you might normally have discarded because of being Over or Under exposed.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2010
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  13. #568

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by DebiDeb View Post
    HotSauce i LOVE this thread. I am up to page 10, and realize I should just go back and take notes. I am a very amateur photographer using a p&s Canon Powershot SX120. I've had it about 8 months, and just now started fooling around with different settings. We'll be a DL on the 8th, so with some help from this thread, I'll hopefully be getting some awesome pics.

    and i'd like to co-sign anyone thanking you for Photoscape info. I had photoshop, but got a new computer, and cannot find the CD.

    Again, thanks!
    Hey DebiDeb,
    If you do use any of these lessons on your upcoming trip (and they actually work), please, please, please come back here and post them in this thread with any info on what helped. I would LOVE to see them.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  14. #569

    • Whip cracker
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Temple of the Forbidden Eye
    Posts
    415

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Great photos and great tips as always Hot Sauce! Keep up the fine work!
    If adventure has a name, it must be Indiana Jones ... and Disneyland

  15. #570

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,769

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    10-25-10
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is one that I’ve been working on for some time now and I am very excited to finally share it with you. In my opinion, it is a very important lesson because it covers something all amateur photographers want to do well but usually struggle with. That is Portrait Photography.

    I want to point out that all of these were taken with the standard 18-55mm kit lens that comes with your DSLR camera. Even though most of what I will discuss is meant for DSLR’s, the same concepts hold true for Point & Shoot cameras and the technique is the same for both. The only difference is that you set the Point & Shoot to Portrait Mode and won't need to zoom as far with a Point & Shoot since they usually have very strong zooming capabilities.

    The most important part of portrait photography is lighting, but in Disneyland, we don’t really have any control over that other than the time of day and where you might position your subject in relation to the light source. You can also use your fill flash on the camera by pressing the shutter half way down for a split second before taking the picture. This will help the flash meter how much light is needed. Although, the on camera flash usually isn’t very good and will overexpose the subject. If at all possible, I prefer to use the natural light and adjust it later in the computer if needed.

    The key to taking portraits, especially those out in the open is to use the Aperture Priority mode on your camera. Set the Aperture to the largest possible size your lens will allow, in the case of the kit lens, that is F/3.5. This allows the most light into the lens and the fastest shutter speed which makes for sharper photos. It also does the important job of blurring the background a bit so the person you are photographing will stand out from the background. In a perfect setting, you would want your subject to be about 8-15 feet away from the background, so it would be blurred even more. Set your ISO to Auto.

    Now the next thing to do is to position yourself far enough away from your subject so you can zoom in as close as your lens will allow. For the Kit Lens, that is 55mm. When you zoom in with the kit lens, it decreases your aperture to its maximum possible at that length which is F/5.6. That is fine. If you remember the post I did a while back about Focal Length, you know that when you zoom in on something, it pulls the background closer to your subject. This is what we want to happen.

    I took these portraits in the lower part of Princess Fantasy Faire which was the ideal place for me to do it because it has really good lighting and the Princesses are not only pretty, but have perfect make up and the backgrounds are attractive. It is also a place where so many of you take pictures of your family with the princesses, so this will hopefully be helpful to you.

    This first picture of Snow White was taken at 18mm, Aperture 3.5, ISO 125. I took it like this to show you how far away she was from the background and you can see that I am pretty far away from her.


    If you want a full body shot like this, you can always take this photo and then crop it to something like this.


    In this photo, she has not moved, nor have I. It was at 55mm, Aperture F/5.6, ISO 1000. (The ISO increased automatically due to the smaller aperture letting in less light.) You can see how the background has moved much closer to her and makes a more attractive photo.


    Now in post processing, we can always crop the photo even further to get the portrait how we want. Personally, I like to add a slight vignette to portraits that are close up shots. Here are a few examples of the same photo, cropped in different degrees with a vignette added. (this one's my favorite)




    These photos of Jasmine are done the same way.
    Focal Length 23mm, Aperture F/3.5, ISO 200


    Focal Length 55mm, Aperture 5.6, ISO 1000


    Here are some different crops of this photo. For the first one, I wanted to keep some of the flowers around her, but she has so much jewelry on that in my opinion, it seems kind of busy.


    Next, I went a bit closer to make it more of a full bust shot, but all the beading and sparkly stuff on her top is still a bit distracting.


    I went even tighter, getting rid of most of her top and just keeping the hands and face. I like this one the best because her hands frame her face well and it lets her face be the main subject, which is what it should be.


    I hope this explains some of the basic principals of portrait photography and helps you capture some magic memories of your own.

    In tomorrow’s post, which is a long one, we will take a look at some portraits from the upper part of Princess Fantasy Faire where the Princess is right against the background. Tomorrow we explore some more intensive post processing techniques in Photoscape.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2010
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com


Similar Threads

  1. [Pictures] First Disneyland Photo Set
    By mainstreetcm in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-15-2010, 01:08 PM
  2. [Pictures] Can you tell me where this photo was taken at Disneyland?
    By Sosai X in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-19-2009, 10:03 PM
  3. [Trip Report] Photo TR: Disneyland in HDR
    By sgtfox in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 11-22-2008, 01:45 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-17-2007, 11:12 AM
  5. Photo TR: Disneyland in the Philippines ... (that's right)
    By sir clinksalot in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 05-05-2006, 12:33 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •