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  1. #796

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by timbre View Post
    I was playing around tonight with putting some new backgrounds into a few pictures and came up with an idea that I am trying right now. First go into photoshop and make a .jpg that is a solid color. I chose 0,255,0 (full green). I painted the entire canvas and saved it at high resolution.

    Then when I go in and do the first edit with the place command I use this "green screen" as my first background to edit in. This gives me the ability to sharply define the borders of each object becasue I know what color I am either adding to or erasing from.

    When the entire image is done, save it as a .PSD and then go back and follow Hot Sauce 1's steps to replace the image.

    It seems like one extra step but allows for precise editing from what I have experimented with tonight.
    It might be an extra step, but if it saves time on the detail work, it is well worth it. I know there is a way of doing this as some type of mask, but I don't know how to do it yet.

    I am hoping to have a new post up later tonight. I did all the editing work, but had to do it on my laptop, so I am not all that happy with the colors in it.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  2. #797

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    1-5-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is a continuation and expansion of the previous posts where we swapped the background in a photo.

    I will start with this photo that I took of the Mark Twain as viewed across the Rivers of America.


    I am going to replace the sky with one that I took of the sunset over La Jolla Cove a few months ago. However, there is one major component in the Mark Twain photo that needs to be accounted for and has not been covered in the previous posts. “REFLECTION” In today’s lesson, we will learn 2 different ways of handling the reflection on the water.

    Step 1: Open the photo of the sky in Photoscape.


    Step 2: In the Crop tab, select Crop Freely and I’m going to crop off most of the bottom of the image but I am going to leave some of the ocean because it will be in the middle of the image that is going to be covered up by the Mark Twain when we are done and it helps bring the reflection of the sky outward into the surface of the water.


    Step 3: Once we have cropped the image, go back to the Home tab and click on Filter-Reflection.


    Step 4: That will bring up this small window. Set the Size to 100%, Level to 100%, leave the Perspective at 50/50 and in the small color tab, change the foreground color to black and click OK. After that, save the image as whatever you want to call it and remember to save it as a jpeg.


    Step 5: Open the Mark Twain image in Photoshop Elements 8 or 9 (either one works fine)


    6: Now we do the same steps we did in the previous lesson. Click File – Place, select the photo of the reflected sky and click OK.


    7: Over in the levels box, where you see the layer with the sky, lower the opacity a bit so you can see the Mark Twain image in the background. Don’t click on the little green check mark yet. We want to be able to move the image to fit the background better.


    8: I lowered the opacity so I can see where the boat is and drag the top of the sky upwards so the sun is above the boat and trees.


    9: Also drag the bottom of the image downward so the sky looks like a good match to the upper half of the photo. Now you can click the little green check mark to set the photo onto the background.


    10: Put the Opacity back up to 100%.


    11: At the bottom of the layers box, click the little white circle and then Levels to create a new Levels Adjustment Layer.


    12: Click on the sky photo layer and press Control + G to create a clipping group, freeing up the layer for editing in the Levels Adjustment Layer.


    13: Click on the Levels Adjustment Layer.


    14: Using a pretty large brush, probably around 300 pixels, set the Foreground color to White and paint over the upper portion of the sky.


    15: Use the Magnifying tool and zoom way in on the sky / tree section, then drop the size of the brush way down to about 15 pixels, or smaller.


    16: Paint along the edges of the trees. Work your way across the photo filling in all the little spots that need it.


    17: Once you’ve finished the small details along the edges, double the brush size and go along that edge.


    18: Make sure you drop the brush size down and fill in all the little spots in the trees where the sun would be shining through.


    19: Once all the little spots have been filled in, increase the brush size and finish off filling in the sky.


    20: On the Top Tool Palette, lower the opacity on the brush to paint the sky on the area of the river where the sky is supposed to be reflecting. You will have to play with the opacity until you find the look that is right for your photo. I struggled to try to figure out how much of the sky should be reflecting on the water in the shadow of the boat and objects on the shore. I looked at dozens of photos of the Mark Twain at different times of day and noticed in all of them that the shadow of the trees and boat was always dark, which is why I only painted the sky up to the edge of that shadow.


    At this stage, save it as a PSD. This way you can swap out the sky for a different one if you choose without having to do the work again.

    21: At the top of the screen, click on Layer – Flatten Image. This flattens all 3 of the layers into one single layer so now it can be edited like any other photo.


    22: In order to make the image more natural looking, I need to adjust the Reds and Yellows on the Mark Twain to account for those colors in the sky that would be casting a warmer light on the Mark Twain. At the top of the screen, click on Enhance – Adjust Color – Adjust Hue/Saturation.


    23: In the Master drop down, click on Reds.


    24: I increased the Saturation a bit and lowered the Lightness of it a bit.


    25: Do the same thing with the Yellows and adjust as needed. (Note: I did this on my laptop which is horrible for color adjustments, so the color on this isn’t exactly how I would like it to be.)


    26: From here I clicked on the Edit – Quick tab so I can make adjustments to the contrast darken the highlights on the Mark Twain. Depending upon your image, it might be a good idea to click on the Auto Color adjustment as well. If you don’t like what that color adjustment does, you can always click UNDO but it might balance all the colors pretty smoothly.


    After that, just adjust as needed and save it as a jpeg. Here is our final image.


    There is another way to achieve a very clean (almost too clean) reflection on the water. You can take your finished image and open it in Photoscape.


    Go to the Crop tab and crop the image as close as you can to the waterline, without catching too much of the reflection of the side of the boat.


    Then go back to the Home tab and click on Filter – Reflection, just like you did for the sky.


    You can see that we still have a double reflection of part of the Mark Twain.


    Go to the Tools tab and you can use either the Clone Stamp Tool or the Paint Brush tool and clone or paint over that part of the reflection.


    I used the clone stamp and cloned the dark part of the shadow and eliminated the part I didn’t want.


    Here is what that finished image looks like.


    Like we did with the previous Tomorrowland images, once the hard work is done, you can swap out the background for anything else you want.


    I hope the length of this lesson didn’t scare you away from doing this type of work. If you do decide to give this a try and all the little detail work with the painting in the little spots becomes too much, you can just save it as a PSD and come back to it whenever you feel like it.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
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  3. #798

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    all I can say is WOW.

  4. #799

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    1-6-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is one that I like to call Fun Wheel Fix Up.

    I’ve noticed lately that several people have mentioned the problems with Mickey’s Fun Wheel, especially with regards to the lights not working. (Bad Show Disney, Bad Show!)

    Well if you are like me and get as frustrated as I do when you take pictures of Mickey’s Fun Wheel and it’s not lit up the way it is supposed to be, never fear, there is a quick and simple way to fix that in Photoshop Elements. (Ok, I know nobody gets as frustrated as I do when pictures aren’t what I want them to be.) First I have to give a huge THANK YOU to my Sister in Law, Kazue for teaching me how to do this.

    Let’s start with this photo I took a while back of the Fun Wheel reflecting across Paradise Lagoon. As you can see, there is a bar of light missing at the top and one of the spokes is out.


    First, open it in Photoshop Elements, (8 or 9 work fine) and use the Magnifying Glass tool to zoom in on the top of the wheel.


    Over in the Layers box, right click on it and Create a Duplicate Layer.


    In the tools bar on the left side of the screen, click on the Lasso Tool. This is what it looks like in PSE 8


    If you are using PSE 9 or depending upon which type of Lasso tool was used last, it might be hidden behind another type of lasso tool. If you right click on it, it will give you the options for the other types of tools.


    Pick which section of the wheel that you want to duplicate and draw a line around it, staying as close to it as you can. You can see that the section I chose should fit that open space perfectly.


    Now Click on the Move Tool. It’s the little 4 arrows and mouse pointer next to the magnifying glass.


    When you click on the Move Tool, it copies that section that you Lassoed and puts it into a Smart Object allowing you to move it however you what.


    As you can see, we can move that section and it won’t affect the part that we copied it from.


    If we didn’t make a Duplicate Layer and just tried to do this to our original image, this is what would happen when you select that piece.


    Now all we have to do is drag that piece over to the section that we need to put it on.


    As you can see, we need to rotate it a bit so it will fit properly. By clicking on the little circle that is just beneath the center of our object, you can spin it however you need.


    Then just drag it into place. If you need to stretch it a bit to make the edges match up, you can click on the corner blocks and stretch it however you need to. Once you are satisfied, click the little green check to release the object.


    At the top of the page, click on Select – Deselect. This will take the selection lines off the lights.


    Here we have our new section all matched up.


    Now move over to the area with the missing spoke lights and using the Lasso Tool again, select a section of lights from the spoke above it. Just make sure you select a long enough section to fill in the gap. If it is too long and overlaps, that doesn’t matter. You can stretch or shrink it so they line up on top of each other and it won’t be noticeable.


    Click on the Move Tool again and drag that section into place, rotating or stretching as needed.


    Once you are satisfied with its position, click Select – Deselect again and then View – Fit on Screen so you can see the entire image.


    If everything is satisfactory, just save it as whatever you choose and you are done.


    The last time I photographed the World of Color Show, I had to do this to approximately 40 photos. I got to the point where it took me less than 5 minutes per image. It was still frustrating that I even had to do it though.

    Hopefully you won’t ever have to use this lesson, but if you do have some of those irritating Fun Wheel photos, I hope this helps.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    For a complete directory and direct links to all of these posts, please click here: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-50.html#post1056358940
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  5. #800

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    1-7-11
    Today's "Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day" is going to be a complete departure from all things Disney related and is simply a wonderful story about an unknown photographer that I wanted to share with you.

    When I first watched this news story about street photographer Vivian Maier her story and her photographs really struck a chord with me because she had such a graceful and elegant way of capturing the human condition with all of it's daily trials, tribulations, beauty and wonder.

    I know that if you are reading this daily column, you are interested in photography, so I hope this story gives you a small part of the enjoyment and inspiration that it has given me.

    http://fstoppers.com/street-photogra...ter-her-death/

    If you would like to read more about her and see more of her amazing photographs, you can check out this blog. Vivian Maier - Her Discovered Work

    Enjoy!

    Mike
    Last edited by Hot Sauce 1; 01-07-2011 at 06:05 PM.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  6. #801

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    1-10-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” goes back to the lesson from 10-23-10 “Fixing Overexposed and Underexposed Photos in Photoshop Elements” and takes it a step further. One of the problems we all face when taking pictures in Disneyland is shadow and light. It seems like no matter where you take a picture, part of it is in a shadow and part of it is in the light, causing part of your image to be underexposed and another part of it to be exposed properly or even overexposed. If you missed the aforementioned post, I recommend reading it first. The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Let’s use this picture I took of the Court of Angels in New Orleans Square for example. Part of it is in dark shadows and the other part is very bright.


    First, we open it in Photoshop Elements and select the Quick Selection Tool.


    Using the Quick Selection Tool, paint over the parts of the image you want to lighten up. The selection tool is pretty hard to control and will grab parts you don’t want to, like the roof of the corridor and the hanging lantern.


    It grabbing unwanted areas isn’t a problem. Up at the top of the page, there are these little tools. We are going to use the Subtract from Selection Tool. It’s the one with the little – next to the wand. (not the one highlighted)


    Carefully paint back the parts you don’t want selected, making sure you keep your edges as clean as possible.


    Once you’ve selected only what you want to lighten up, make a new Levels Adjustment Layer by right clicking the little button at the bottom of the Layers box.


    You can see in the Levels Adjustment Layer that the part we selected is white and the portion we don’t want to touch is in black. Whatever we do to this layer will only affect the part in white.


    While the Levels Adjustment Layer is still selected, go to the Layer Mode dropdown menu right above it and select Screen.


    You can see how that lightened up that portion of the photo.


    Right next to the levels box, is the Adjustment tool for that layer. Double click the little box in it’s left, with the two little wheels in it.


    That will open up the Adjustment tool. You can brighten up the selected part of the image a little more by sliding the white slider arrow on the right over to the left until you reach the desired brightness. By sliding the little gray arrow in the middle to the right, it will increase the contrast a little bit.


    If you are happy with the photo at this stage, just save it as whatever you want to call it. Don’t forget to save it as a PSD as well, so we can open it again and make other adjustments if we choose.
    Before / After


    In tomorrows post, we will take this a few steps further, quickly making adjustments to the opposite area.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
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  7. #802

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Hi Michael

    I just wanted to give you a big THANK YOU for posting so much useful and easy to understand information. You even got me to join Micechat just to comment on your thread! Your information is so helpful and even better, its in plain understandable english! It is thanks to your tips and explanations that I fully understand my DSLR now (and its thanks to you I have new toys to play with - lenses and photoshop ). You have also inspired me to not only "take" a picture, but to truly "make" a picture and have a great time doing it too.

    So thanks again. You are AWESOME.

    Andrea

  8. #803

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by anndreeuhh View Post
    Hi Michael

    I just wanted to give you a big THANK YOU for posting so much useful and easy to understand information. You even got me to join Micechat just to comment on your thread! Your information is so helpful and even better, its in plain understandable english! It is thanks to your tips and explanations that I fully understand my DSLR now (and its thanks to you I have new toys to play with - lenses and photoshop ). You have also inspired me to not only "take" a picture, but to truly "make" a picture and have a great time doing it too.

    So thanks again. You are AWESOME.

    Andrea
    That is so VERY kind of you to say. I was beginning to wonder if anyone was even reading these anymore and if I was just talking to air. THANK YOU for validating that there is someone who reads this and can use it.

    Mike
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  9. #804

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I read all of them. The Vivian photos and story were very intriguing!
    Died in 1720 ya know...

    Checkout all my Disneyland photos
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5198394...7625048447449/

  10. #805

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    No fears, Mike!

    We are still here, panting, just trying to catch our breath from your latest posts!!!

    Have no mercy, though, and keep them coming...


    Thanks as always
    Rico

  11. #806

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Nthing the "reading but silent" posts. I'm still here; just don't know what else to say other than "awesome"! Hahaha.

  12. #807

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    1-11-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is part two of yesterdays post about fixing under or overexposed areas in a photo. Today we go a few steps further by adjusting the overexposed area of the same photograph.

    So here is where we left off yesterday.


    Go up to the top of the page and click on the Select tab. In the dropdown menu, click Reselect.


    This places the selection lines back on our photo where we last placed them. Then go back up to the Select tab and click Inverse.


    I don’t want to darken the roof of the corridor, so I am going to click on the Selection Tool and then the Subtract from Selection brush at the top, then remove the roof from the selected area.


    Now the only area that I am working on is the bright parts in the center of the photo.


    Back over in the Layers box, go back down to the Levels button and create a new Levels Adjustment Layer just like we did before.


    It will appear above your other one and as you can see, we have the new layer and are only going to be working in the white portion.


    Right above that, in the Layers Mode menu, click on Multiply.


    Notice how dark this made the courtyard.


    Remember, as with any adjustment layer we are working with, we can always adjust the Opacity of that layer so we can control the amount of its effect. I don’t want the courtyard that dark, so I am going to drop the Opacity down to 25%.


    Then for finer adjustments, double click on the button with the two wheels to bring up the Adjustment box. Also remember, since the opacity is down to 25% any fine adjustment we make in this box, will only have 25% of its effect. This is actually quite nice for fine details.


    A side effect of the Mutliply Layer Mode is that the darkening effect also tends to over saturate the colors a bit. (Personally, I don’t see that as a problem in this photo but for the sake of this lesson, I am going to show how to adjust it in case you need to.)

    Go back up to the top and click Select – Reselect again.


    Back over in the Layers Box, click on the Levels button and instead of creating a new Levels Adjustment Layer, we are going to click on Hue/Saturation which will give us a new layer on top that is only for adjusting the color saturation of the selected (white) part of that layer.


    As we did before, clicking on the little wheels will bring up an Adjustment Tool where we can drop the Saturation a little bit and the lightness of those colors.


    Depending upon your specific image and needs, you can also click on the Master tab in this box which will let you adjust certain color palettes individually. I don’t need it for this photo but it is something you should be aware of incase you need to.


    And here is the final image.


    I hope these two lessons can help save some of your otherwise under or overblown photos.

    I’m off to Disneyland tomorrow with fellow Micechatter Corsair to take lots and lots of pictures. I am very excited about it because he has been creating some of the most amazing photos from Disneyland that I have ever seen. I plan to be a human sponge and learn all I can from him. If you haven’t seen his Flickr page, you won’t believe your eyes. You can check it out at: Flickr: Gregg L Cooper's Photostream

    The next lesson will be extremely valuable, not only for Disneyland but many, many of your outdoor photos. Trust me, you’re going to love it…..

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
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  13. #808

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    If I could put in a requets. I know in the past you have done a tutorial on HDR images. Can you go more into depth on the creation of them? I have tried a few and always come up with a wierdly exposed very very very noisy image that looks really bad.

  14. #809

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...




    Is this an ok image? used a nikon coolpix L22 on the sunset setting..has not been retouched at all.

  15. #810

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    ^Very nice! I would merge that one with a photo showing evenly exposed detail on the skyline, or otherwise forget about the structures and go into Photoshop, adjusting the levels and saturation to really bring out the color in the sky.


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