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  1. #871

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobd20011 View Post
    Nice work as always. I am excited to finally get back to Disneyland this weekend to get some shots. This will be my first time with a DSLR and I am very excited--especially after all that I have learned from your lessons.

    The one lesson that you have not covered is how to chase a toddler around the park without breaking your camera.
    LOL! I can't answer that one but it does remind me of a very funny story that can serve as a warning.

    About 10 years ago (before people really used DSLR cameras) my wife and I were sitting on a bench near the Partners Statue enjoying the early morning sun. A family with two small children sat down on the bench across from us. The dad went and bought some popcorn and a soda. He and his wife put some of the popcorn in smaller containers and gave one to each child, one walking and one in a stroller. They also poured the soda into smaller cups and gave one to each child. Once the kids had their snacks in hand, he sat down and pulled out his camera to load the film. At the moment he had the camera on his lap with the back open, the girl in the stroller threw some popcorn to the pidgeons that had gathered around her. One of the pidgeons flew up near her, causing her to throw her arms back. In one hand she had her cup of soda that flew out of her cup in a picture perfect arching stream right into the open camera. It could'nt have happened any more perfectly in a thousand tries. The dad just sat there stunned for a moment and then held the camera out and poured the soda out of the camera. Of course this was before I was into photgraphy so I thought it was the funniest thing I had ever seen and had to hide behind my wifes back because I was laughing so hard. Ok, even now I think it was really funny.

    So the moral of that story is don't mess with your camera while your toddler has a drink in her hand.

    What day are you going to be there? I will be at Disneyland on Friday.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  2. #872

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Hey! That was me and my kids! It was really infuriating when my kid did that! It was an expensive camera!

    Naw, just kidding. It does go to further show just why God makes children cute.

  3. #873

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I have to apologize again for a bit of a delay for my next post. It will be a complete walkthrough of taking and processing HDR images. It is by far the longest post I have done and will take 2 days to go through every detail. I thought I had it all set and uploaded the 67 photos to Flickr then decided I didn't like the final photo so I deleted them all and am starting over with a new one. I hope to have the first part of it up late tomorrow night.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  4. #874

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Sauce 1 View Post
    I have to apologize again for a bit of a delay for my next post. It will be a complete walkthrough of taking and processing HDR images. It is by far the longest post I have done and will take 2 days to go through every detail. I thought I had it all set and uploaded the 67 photos to Flickr then decided I didn't like the final photo so I deleted them all and am starting over with a new one. I hope to have the first part of it up late tomorrow night.
    This will probably be my most anticipated post from you...I really admire your HDRs because they're so restrained and the one you took of Tarzan's Treehouse may still be my most favorite ever.

  5. #875

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by niklj View Post
    This will probably be my most anticipated post from you...I really admire your HDRs because they're so restrained and the one you took of Tarzan's Treehouse may still be my most favorite ever.
    Well Thank You! It will be a really long post because I am doing it under the assumption that some people will have never used Photmatix before and need to know what every little slider does. It might not be the way other people use the program, it is only what seems to work for me, so we'll see what happens.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  6. #876

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    2-9-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is part 1 of a 2 part post on Processing HDR images.
    I’ve gone into the definition of what HDR is and how to set up your camera in a previous post, so I’ll forego that in this one. If you haven’t seen that part, here is the link: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-2.html#post1056117536


    I’ll start with some general information about shooting HDR images.
    1. Bad Light is Bad Light. All the HDR processing in the world isn’t going to change that.
    2. Subjects with very little contrast do not make good HDR images because there isn’t much difference between light and dark.
    3. High ISO causes noise in your photos and is amplified in HDR processing. For best results, keep your ISO as low as you can. If I have to put the ISO above 200, I won’t try it as a HDR. It just makes way too much noise.
    4. Photos with moving objects such as people during the day time do not make good HDR. It creates a distracting item with an uncomfortable blur that doesn’t belong.
    5. Every single image is different. I have never had 2 of them use the same settings. However, there are some parts of the processing that are pretty universal to most of the images I do.
    When it comes to HDR work, everyone has their own desires for what they want their images to look like. Some people like a more grainy, textured look with dark skies while others like a very bright and overly saturated color to their pictures. My personal belief is that HDR images should look as natural as possible and that people shouldn’t be able to tell it is HDR. My style of processing is all about getting the most natural looking results as possible. As you do more of them, you will develop your own style of processing and unique look to your images.

    I am going to cover the processing as if no one has ever used Photomatix before or has ever processed a HDR image. For those of you that have, the first part of this will be pretty remedial. The program most people use for processing HDR is Photomatix. There is also NIK HDR Effects but I don’t have it, so we won’t go there. Please note: This is only my way of processing HDR. I have never taken a class, read a book on it or seen anyone else do it. This is just what works for me.

    These are the 3 images we are going to work with. I took them the other night after seeing the World of Color show, on my way out of the park. The first image is properly exposed (according to the camera)


    This is the image that is -2 on the Exposure compensation;


    Here is the +2.


    Step 1; Open Photomatix and click on Generate HDR Image. That will bring up the window where you browse through your images to select the ones you want to use. Click on those 3 images and click Open, then OK.


    That brings up this box. If you had to shoot them without a tripod, make sure to check the Align Source Images box. If there might be some aberrations in the image, such as lens distortion on the edges, check the Reduce Chromatic Aberrations box. I always check the Reduce Noise box no matter what. It can’t hurt right. The Take Tone Curve of Color Profile should also be checked.


    When you click OK, it will generate this image, which is alarming at first because it is such an ugly, noisy mess. Click on Tone Mapping.


    Now you are in the Tone Mapping section. I set all the sliders to the middle so I can show you a somewhat blank slate and what each one does. Once you have done one, it will keep the settings you used on your last image.


    If you are concerned about a certain portion of the photo, you can move your mouse over it and it will give you a small square. By clicking it, it opens a small window that is a blow up of that section. Personally, I find those kind of distracting, so I don’t use it unless I am really focused on a small detail.


    At the very bottom of the sliders there is a menu with some preset options. Here is what it looks like on Natural.


    Here is what it looks like on Default.


    Now on Smooth Skies.


    This on is called Painterly. (pretty hideous if you asked me)


    This one is called Grunge and is pretty appropriate for the way it looks. Needless to say, I NEVER use the presets.


    Now I’m going to put it on Custom, so I can make all the adjustments myself, starting at the top and working my way down the line. The first slider is Strength. This is what it looks like at 0


    Here is Strength at 100. (I always set it at 100 and do all my processing with it set there. I can always bring it down some later if needed. So far, I haven’t had to bring it below 80, but like I said, “every image is different.”)


    The next slider is Saturation. Here it is set at 0


    Now at 100


    I always start with the Saturation at 50 and adjust from there. For this image I am choosing 52.


    The next slider is Luminosity which controls how well it is lit. I moved it down most of the way to -5.0


    Here it is at +5.0.


    Once again, I start in the middle. I set it at +0.3

    The next slider is Microcontrast which is a pretty important and powerful slider. Here it is all the way to the left at -10.0


    Here it is all the way to the right at +10.0. This is another one that I always leave at +10.0 until I finish working my way down the line. If I need to come back to it afterwards, I can. I rarely have to move this from +10.0


    Next is Smoothing, which controls how the light is balanced throughout the image. It is one that can go either way depending upon the image and what you want to highlight in it. Here is what it is at -10.0 Notice how it is bright around the edges and dark in the middle.


    Here it is at +10.0. Notice how it is dark around the edges and light in the middle.


    I wanted pretty even light throughout the image, so I settled on -4.0


    I am going to skip over the next two sliders and go to Gamma. This is one of the most powerful sliders and seems to control the intensity of the effect. Here it is all the way down at 2.00


    Here it is all the way to the right at 0.35. You can see it is pretty intense.


    I settled for somewhere near the middle at 0.75


    Now let’s go back up to the White Point Slider. This seems like it controls the brightness of the colors and lightness in the image. It almost works like a brightness adjustment. Here it is all the way down at 0.00. You can see it is very dark.


    All the way to the right at 5.00 it is very bright.


    I settled a little above half way at 2.290


    The next slider is the Black Point that controls how strong the blacks are. Here is what it looks like at 0.00


    Here is what it looks like at 5.00


    Normally, the White Point and Black Point should be close to each other for a nice, smooth balance. I selected 2.231


    Now we go down to Color Temperature. This controls the warmth of the colors. Here is what it looks like all the way down to -10.0. You can see that it is pretty blue and cold.


    All the way over at +10.0, you can see it is very yellow and warm.


    I usually leave it very close to the middle and chose 0.4


    The next slider is Saturation Highlights, which controls the saturation of color in the bright areas. Notice that as it is turned all the way down to -10.0, the bright spots are almost black and white.


    At +10.0, the bright spots are very over saturated and too intense.


    This one I like to keep near the middle, so I chose -0.5


    Next is the Saturation Shadows slider. It controls the saturation in the darkest areas of the image.
    Here it is at -10.0.


    Here is at +10.0. I know, you can’t tell much difference. It all depends upon the image.


    I also keep this one near the middle and set it at 0.5


    There are a few more sliders below the Saturation Shadows slider. You just have to slide the side the menu bar down a bit.


    First up is the Micro-smoothing slider that gives a finer control over the smoothing that we did above. Here it is at 0.0


    And all the way over at 30.0


    I have had some where I needed it all the way down to 5.0 and some where I set it above 25.0. For this image I chose 11.9.


    Next is the Highlights Smoothness. It controls how smooth the bright spots of the image are. Watch the bright light reflections on the center of the train. Here is at 0


    Here it is at 100. Notice how blown out the light on the train is.


    I want the reflections on the train to be more colorful and smooth, so I set it down to 21.


    Next is the Shadows Smoothness slider, which does the same thing as the Highlights Smoothness slider but in the dark areas of the image. Watch the sky for the differences with this one. Here it is at 0


    Here it is at 100. Notice how much darker and smoother the sky is.


    I chose a somewhat mid point at 58.


    The next slider is the Shadows Clipping slider. To be perfectly honest, I can’t see that this does anything. I’ve moved it all the way up and down and see no difference, so I skipped it. If you are not quite happy with the image, now is the time to go back to the top and play with some of the more powerful sliders such as Strength, Microcontrast, Gamma and White Point. For this one, I am going to leave it as is and click Process. This will give us our final image.


    At this stage is when most people think they are done with the image and will leave it as is. To me, there is more work to be done in order to achieve a more natural and cleaner look. We will tackle that in tomorrows post.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    For a complete directory and direct links to all of these posts, please click here: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-50.html#post1056358940
    Last edited by Hot Sauce 1; 02-09-2011 at 04:11 PM.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  7. #877

    • Tom Bricker
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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Well, needless to say I was wrong with my 3 images prediction. My idea was right (image for the wheel, swings, and WoC), but you used more images than I expected. You sure put a lot of work into your shots!

    Now I am intrigued by the train shot, too, and can't wait to read part 2!

    Thanks for the interesting reads!

  8. #878

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    2-10-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” is Part 2 of Processing HDR Images.

    We left off yesterday finishing the Tone Mapping and processing the image in Photomatix. For most, that is the end. Since my goal is to have a natural looking photo, I take it a few steps (ok quite a few) further. I have no idea if this is how other people process their HDR’s, this is simply my technique for creating a smoother, richer, more natural looking image. I also have to say that virtually all the HDR images I create are night time photos, so I haven’t tried this on day time shots. I don’t know how it would work with photos lit by sunlight.

    This is the tonemapped image from yesterday and our starting point today.


    First I open the Tone Mapped HDR image and the +/-0 exposure image in Photoshop Elements.
    Highlight both images and click on File – New – Photomerge Exposure.


    That will bring up this screen with a few adjustment sliders that aren’t that necessary at this point because we will still be adjusting the photo in other ways and we can make those adjustments later. Click Done.


    This is what it looks like at this stage.


    Then I save that Photomerge image as is and close out the other two. At this point, I have the Photomerge image open and then open the -2 exposure image. The reason we are doing this is to tone down the overly bright spots in the photo such as the hanging lights, signs and headlights on the front of the train.


    Now we make a Levels Adjustment Layer between the two images in the Layers panel, click on the upper image and press Control G, just like we have done in previous lessons.


    With Black as the Foreground Color, choose a large brush and paint over the entire image so the bottom Photomerged image is showing.


    Zoom into the hanging signs. At the top of the screen, drop the opacity of the brush down to 20% and shrank my brush size down to 25 pixels. Change the foreground color to White.


    Then with smooth continuous strokes, paint over the signs until they are more balanced to the rest of the image. The more you paint over them, the darker they will become. Here is the result.


    Now I am going to work on the California Zephyr and Silver Platter signs on the side of the train. For this, I will drop my brush size down a little and the Opacity down to 10%.


    Notice how clearer they are now.


    Next up is the headlights and sign on the front of the train.


    Here it is after toning it down a little.


    Next I will make my brush size just a little bit bigger than the hanging lights and click on them a few times to tone them down.


    I also zoomed into the window on the shops that were really bright and toned those down.


    At this stage, Save it as a PSD in case you want to come back to it and make any more adjustments. Then click on Layer – Flatten Image.


    Now I want to get rid of any distractions that might draw attention away from the train and the colors reflecting off it, which is the main subject of the photo and where I want people looking. On edge of the frame, you can see a little bit of lights on top of the roof of the shades over the seating area.


    Using the Clone Stamp Tool, select a spot just above them and clone them out, just like we did in the World of Color photo the other day. I also got rid of the ice cream store sign.


    Also notice the bright spot of light reflecting on the side of the trash can. I will clone that out as well.



    Next I noticed a bunch of shiny little dots on the ground.


    For these, choose the Spot Healing Brush and make the brush just big enough to cover each little spot and get rid of those.



    Here is what our final image looks like after all this. Save it as a jpeg and call it what you like.


    Now I am going to open that image in Photoscape for some minor lighting and color adjustments.


    First I want to brighten up small parts of it so I click on Backlight - +25%.


    Then in the Bright/Color tab, click on Contrast Enhancement – Low. This just gives a little more separation between light and dark areas making the image a little sharper.


    Next in the Bright/Color tab click on Saturation Curve.


    First I clicked on the center of the line so it stays put. Then I clicked on the upper part and lower part and increased those just a touch.


    That gives us our final image. “finally”


    So to recap, this was the original properly exposed image out of the camera.


    Then we created the HDR and tonemapped it.


    Then we made the photomerge Exposure in Photoshop Elements and toned it down with the -2 exposure image and cleaned up any distractions.


    And last but not least, we made some slight adjustments in Photoscape to create our final photo.


    I hope this really, really long look into how I process HDR images doesn’t scare you off doing it for yourself. On average I spend about 20-30 minutes on each one. Here are a few more that I have processed the same way. I hope you like them.








    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    For a complete directory and direct links to all of these posts, please click here: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-50.html#post1056358940
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  9. #879

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Wonderful! I've read a lot of HDR tutorials before, but this is the first time that I've actually felt the courage to do it myself. It was very easy to read and very clear and--most of all--the final product is very desirable!

    Thanks again Michael. We're so lucky to have you here sharing all your knowledge with us.

  10. #880

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    It must have taken you a year and a half to get all of those images together for that last tutorial. THANK you for all of your hard work. That train shot is SICK (as my kids would say.) And congrats on your last two explores! You're on fire lately!

    Looking forward to seeing you the next couple of days at the park, and March 6 should also be fun. I hope people are able to come.

  11. #881

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I feel really dumb right now. Or impatient with my own learning. Great job here!! Thanks for all the tips!
    Stockholder and Walt Disney Autograph holder!!

  12. #882

    • Tom Bricker
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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    That tutorial is insane. I spend about the same amount of time per photo, but all of my time is in Bridge>ACR>Photoshop CS5. Have you considered moving from Elements to CS5? With the kind of work you're doing, it definitely seems that it'd be advantageous and would streamline your workflow.

    Since getting the D7000, I've found that I actually spend less time processing. The camera has better dynamic range, so I find myself much more easily satisfied after applying a preset in ACR, then moving to Photoshop for some minor touch-ups.

  13. #883

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by niklj View Post
    Wonderful! I've read a lot of HDR tutorials before, but this is the first time that I've actually felt the courage to do it myself. It was very easy to read and very clear and--most of all--the final product is very desirable!

    Thanks again Michael. We're so lucky to have you here sharing all your knowledge with us.
    Very kind of you to say. Thank you. It really isn't that hard. You just have to play with it for a while and see what each thing does and what you like.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mac Daddy View Post
    It must have taken you a year and a half to get all of those images together for that last tutorial. THANK you for all of your hard work. That train shot is SICK (as my kids would say.) And congrats on your last two explores! You're on fire lately!

    Looking forward to seeing you the next couple of days at the park, and March 6 should also be fun. I hope people are able to come.
    It felt like a year and a half, but it was only about 14 hours of work between doing all the editing, screen capturing, writing and uploading. I'm pooped.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Apples4Disney View Post
    I feel really dumb right now. Or impatient with my own learning. Great job here!! Thanks for all the tips!
    Don't. I'm the worst when it comes to learning these programs. I finally had to accept the fact that I'm slow at these things and embrace the challenge of trying to learn them.

    Quote Originally Posted by WDWFigment View Post
    That tutorial is insane. I spend about the same amount of time per photo, but all of my time is in Bridge>ACR>Photoshop CS5. Have you considered moving from Elements to CS5? With the kind of work you're doing, it definitely seems that it'd be advantageous and would streamline your workflow.

    Since getting the D7000, I've found that I actually spend less time processing. The camera has better dynamic range, so I find myself much more easily satisfied after applying a preset in ACR, then moving to Photoshop for some minor touch-ups.
    Thanks Tom. To be honest, I'm stunned and flattered you even read my column. I know it is far beneath your talent level and abilities. I am considering getting CS5. I have Lightroom, which is what I should be doing most of my work in but I haven't figured out how to do anything in it yet. (I've had it almost a year) I just bought a book on Lightroom which I want to learn first before stepping up to CS5. And one day stepping up to a Canon 5D Mark II. My T1i is a great camera but doesn't have a great dynamic range or handle high ISO very well. One day......
    Life is far too short for bland food!


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  14. #884

    • Tom Bricker
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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Sauce 1 View Post
    Thanks Tom. To be honest, I'm stunned and flattered you even read my column. I know it is far beneath your talent level and abilities. I am considering getting CS5. I have Lightroom, which is what I should be doing most of my work in but I haven't figured out how to do anything in it yet. (I've had it almost a year) I just bought a book on Lightroom which I want to learn first before stepping up to CS5. And one day stepping up to a Canon 5D Mark II. My T1i is a great camera but doesn't have a great dynamic range or handle high ISO very well. One day......
    Far beneath me? Please. I'm self-taught with all this photography 'stuff', so I often find that I totally am unaware of crucial elements to the entire process. Besides, anyone who thinks they can't learn something from talented photographers is an idiot. I certainly picked up on some things in your post that I want to give a whirl.

    Lightroom is like ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) on steroids. I only used the Beta of LR, and I found it wasn't really for me based upon what it could do, versus what I needed. For me, ACR & Bridge (then Photoshop) are a better answer.

    I guess buying Photoshop CS5 depends upon whether you have someone with an @edu email address. If so, you can get it cheap. If not, eh...upgrade that camera or the lenses first. I'm far from a gear snob (half the photos I have from DLR were taken with my wife's D40--and I think they look halfway decent!), but nice lenses and a nice body trump post processing software any day of the week. Especially when you're doing pretty well with what you have processing-wise!

  15. #885

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    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I really appreciate the time you take to post these in-depth tutorials. Before you mentioned you were going to post a tutorial on HDR I was inspired to give it a whirl after browsing the amazing photos on MiceChat flickr group, and again your post gave me information that I was missing, like how you tone down the lights. Now to translate that into the open source programs that I'm using...


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