Page 85 of 158 FirstFirst ... 3560758283848586878895110135 ... LastLast
Results 1,261 to 1,275 of 2361
  1. #1261

    • Some imagination, huh?
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles Area
    Posts
    747

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Could I request a little something about when to use exposure compensation?

  2. #1262

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Omichron Persei 8
    Posts
    115

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by niklj View Post
    Could I request a little something about when to use exposure compensation?
    When you use exposure compensation, you are telling the camera that it's alright to underexpose an image and that helps you squeeze out a faster shutter speed. So you can use it any time you need to push your shutter speeds. On my camera that option is available in Aperture Priority mode and I've never actually used anything below -2. But if you don't have that option on your camera, you can always just increase the shutter speed yourself in Manual or Shutter Priority.

  3. #1263

    • Some imagination, huh?
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles Area
    Posts
    747

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Cool thanks for that!

  4. #1264

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by niklj View Post
    Could I request a little something about when to use exposure compensation?
    Here's a simple answer as to when to use Exposure Compensation... Always!
    A while back I was listening to a photography podcast and the photographers were discussing what mode they shoot in, ie: Full Manual, Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority. Most of them said they normally shoot in Aperture Priority but one of them said something that stuck with me. He said "I shoot in Aperture Priority in conjuction with Exposure Compensation."

    I didn't understand it at the time but once I did, it became so clear as to how advantageous it can be.

    Even with my DSLR, on any sunny day I have the exposure compensation down 1/3rd of a stop. With my P&S, on a sunny day it is turned down at least 1/3 but if it is a very bright day, it is down 2/3. We don't do this to increase the shutter speed because there is plenty of light, but rather to cut down on over exposed parts of the photos. On a sunny day, the camera naturally over exposes any bright areas in an attempt to balance the light and dark areas of the scene. Any light colors such as baby blues or whites are always blown out, especially if shooting in Black and White. My wife Diane shoots a lot of "Street Photography" and candids of people in Disneyland, both in Color and Black & White. Invariably, any little girl in an Alice in Wonderland costume is going to be over exposed.

    Another great reason to lower the exposure compensation during the day time is because of something we have noticed (at least with our P&S) is that with it set to 0, most of the pictures seem kind of flat. There isn't very much depth to them because there isn't enough contrast between light and dark. By having it down a little bit, we get deeper shadows, which is very helpful, espeically in black and white photography.

    For night time shots, we keep it down anywhere between -1 and -2, so we can keep the ISO as low as possible and shutter speed fast enough to not need a tripod. It is very easy to brighten up a dark photo but you can't fix a blurry or over exposed picture.

    I experienced the other side of the exposure spectrum tonight. We are in the process of having our floors refinished at work so our kitchen is now completley empty of all tables and equipment. our floors are white and the ceiling is white with almond colored walls. I was taking pictures of it empty as the "Before" photos with the exposure compensation set at 0. We have a ton of flourescent lights, with daylight spectrum bulbs in them but because it was indoors and in flourescent light, the pictures were dark. I turned the exposure compensation up +1/3 and was able to ge a properly exposed photo.

    I hope this helps.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  5. #1265

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Omichron Persei 8
    Posts
    115

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    So does the camera actually calibrate the image or is it purely controlled with shutter speeds? The last time I compared shots with Exposure Compensation to the ones I did without it, the only difference was how fast I could shoot and there weren't any visible changes in the contrast, just a general darkening of the image. And I'm asking this from a technical standpoint because I am thinking that if it's a forced or manual recalibration then the image might be higher contrast as opposed to controlling your hot spots with your shutter speed.

  6. #1266

    • John Lawless
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    162

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I have a camera related question. I have a teenager who is interested in photography since her aunt purchased the latest Rebel several months ago. Aunt has 18 mega pixels. I have found an older Rebel on Craigslist for $225 - with a EF-S 18-55 mm kit lens and extra battery - BUT it has only 8 mega pixels.

    Do you think the lower mega pixel number would be a reason to avoid this camera? Would it ruin the teenage photographer's experience, when compared to what she knows her aunt's camera can do?

  7. #1267

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by SwinginOnAStar View Post
    So does the camera actually calibrate the image or is it purely controlled with shutter speeds? The last time I compared shots with Exposure Compensation to the ones I did without it, the only difference was how fast I could shoot and there weren't any visible changes in the contrast, just a general darkening of the image. And I'm asking this from a technical standpoint because I am thinking that if it's a forced or manual recalibration then the image might be higher contrast as opposed to controlling your hot spots with your shutter speed.
    Our P&S doesn't have the ability to manually control the aperture or shutter speed. There is a section in it for long exposure night shots but it isn't that great. It seems with ours, especially when shooting in monochrome that by dropping the exposure compensation a bit that we get more contrast between light and dark. However, most of the time, if the exposure compensation is set to 0, it will overexpose any bright areas of the picture. When we were all photographing the parade during the Photo Meet, Diane had it set to 0 and every single shot is so overexposed that none of them are useable. If the people were in the sunlight, their faces are completely washed out. By dropping the EC a little, we not only keep bright spots in check, the shadows are a little darker which is what Diane likes to have.

    The only way to control aperture on our camera is by zooming. At the widest focal length it is F/2.8 and when you zoom it goes to F/6.3. "I think" that if we put it on Landscape Mode it sets the aperture at F/11. I would have to try it out and take some test shots to see exactly what it does. What surprises me about when shooting it on Macro Mode is that even at F/2.8 it has no change to depth of field. No matter what we do, we can't get any kind of bokeh at all with it.

    I forgot to mention in my previous post that almost all P&S cameras (except for the newer ones) only shoot in jpeg which severely limits the amount of things that can be corrected in post. If shooting in RAW you can get away with a lot more exposure mistakes.

    ---------- Post added 06-28-2011 at 09:55 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by fancybauer View Post
    I have a camera related question. I have a teenager who is interested in photography since her aunt purchased the latest Rebel several months ago. Aunt has 18 mega pixels. I have found an older Rebel on Craigslist for $225 - with a EF-S 18-55 mm kit lens and extra battery - BUT it has only 8 mega pixels.

    Do you think the lower mega pixel number would be a reason to avoid this camera? Would it ruin the teenage photographer's experience, when compared to what she knows her aunt's camera can do?
    The biggest question to ask yourself about the mega pixels is what you plan to do with the pictures. If you don't plan on printing them any larger than 8 x 10, 8 mega pixels is more than enough. If it shoots in RAW and you shoot in the largest file size possible, you can easily print them up to 11 x 14.

    If you are basically looking at them on a computer screen and uploading to the web or printing them in say 4x6 on your printer, 8 is all you will ever need. All of the professional photographers I know say the same thing. "I would rather have 10 megapixels on a good sensor than 20 on a mediocre one."

    That 8 mega pixel sensor might very well be the same size sensor that is in your aunt's camera. They just crammed more pixels onto it. My T1i has 15 mp and the new T3i has 18 but it is still the exact same sensor.

    If there were an instance where you knew you wanted to take a picture and have it printed really big (I just had one done at 30" x 60" out of 6 images stitched together) take it as a panorama style shot and that will give you a larger base to work with.

    If the camera on Craig's list is in good condition and all the stuff works, that is a good price and will serve you well while you develop your craft. If anything, whatever limitations it might pose will make you more creative in the way you take your pictures. Just look at Natalie (SwingingOnAStar) she uses a P&S and has won both of our Photo Meet Photo Contests against a bunch of people with more experience using DSLR's. She knows what her camera can do and what she has to do to bring her artistic vision to life, and she does it very well. I am constantly amazed at what she can do with her camera.

    If you do buy that camera on Craig's List, I would recommend taking it to a camera shop for a cleaning and a look over. They might find something little that needs to be fixed or cleaned, which will make your beginning experience with it much more enjoyable and less frustrating.
    Last edited by Hot Sauce 1; 06-28-2011 at 08:54 AM.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  8. #1268

    • Some imagination, huh?
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles Area
    Posts
    747

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    What's the difference between lowering your exposure, say one stop, and using a neutral density filter?

  9. #1269

    • Tom Bricker
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    596

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    With regard to shooting modes and exposure comp, my mantra is this: you can always pull more detail out of an underexposed photo, but you can't recover totally blown highlights from an overexposed photo. I always underexpose -.7 during the day. I also use the exposure lock to meter off of the "right things" in photos.

    At night, I usually shoot in full manual mode and just use whatever exposure time and apertures suit my fancy. I am pretty good at guessing what the exposure *should* be in a nighttime shot without regard for the meter or what the camera might think. YMMV on that one, though.

  10. #1270

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    673

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    This might seem a little silly but I love the shots in this thread and those of the photo contests etc. and I have been quietly interested in photography myself for quite some time now. What I'd like to know is what camera would be best for a very beginner as myself. Our family has been using a cheap Kodak digital camera. I don't have a lot of money to invest in it, but I think I'd like to upgrade a bit to start pursuing more advanced photography. What exactly is a point and shoot? Would that be a good choice? Any help all you photog champions could give me would be greatly appreciated!
    ap·pur·te·nant – adjective: appertaining or belonging; pertaining.

    ...to Disneyland.

  11. #1271

    • Senior Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    4,827

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Point and shoot are the little pocket cameras. I used one for several years until I was ready for a DSLR. They're great, because you can always have it with you, and my learning curve involved taking lots of pictures, in lots of places, and seeing how they came out. Planning photo outings was less productive, but spotting something that would make a great picture, and having my little camera with me, was great.

    Disadvantage of the P&S- they usually don't have a lot of features or adjustability, but they have several presets, and you learn how to use them. Sunset, daylight, landscape- that kind of thing. Mine is a Casio EX-Z9. I think they run a bit over $100.

    I hope you find a great new camera and keep taking pictures!
    I pledge allegiance to the Earth, one planet, many gods, and to the universe in which she spins.

  12. #1272

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    Quote Originally Posted by dl_appurtenant View Post
    This might seem a little silly but I love the shots in this thread and those of the photo contests etc. and I have been quietly interested in photography myself for quite some time now. What I'd like to know is what camera would be best for a very beginner as myself. Our family has been using a cheap Kodak digital camera. I don't have a lot of money to invest in it, but I think I'd like to upgrade a bit to start pursuing more advanced photography. What exactly is a point and shoot? Would that be a good choice? Any help all you photog champions could give me would be greatly appreciated!
    The best camera for a beginner is one that you are comfortable with and can learn to use. My suggestion would be to find several cameras in your price range, then look at how each of them work, ie: menus and functions. If some of them seem confusing or difficult, weed them out. if one stands out as easy to understand, that would be the best camera for you.

    Start with a Point & Shoot because the first thing you should learn is composition. No matter what camera is used, if a photo has bad or boring composition, no one wants to look at it. The rest will come in time.

    One more thing to think about when selecting a camera. If you plan on upgrading to a DSLR at some time in the future, think about getting a camera made by a company that also makes DSLR's. The reason I say this is because their menu systems will be similar. I have a Canon Point & Shoot, so when I wanted a DSLR, I chose a Canon as well. Knowing how their menu and operations worked was a big advantage when the time came.

    I hope that helps.

    ---------- Post added 06-29-2011 at 12:01 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by niklj View Post
    What's the difference between lowering your exposure, say one stop, and using a neutral density filter?
    A Neutral Density Filter cuts down the amount of light that can enter the lens and will do one of two things, slow down the shutter speed (which is why you use them for photographing wateralls or fireworks) or force the camera to increase the ISO to maintain the same shutter speed.

    Lowering the Exposure Compensation allows the camera to under expose a photo which can actually increase the shutter speed and/or lower the ISO.

    From an image to image standpoint, they might both look the same but depending upon the situation, a slower shutter speed can cause a blurry photo by camera shake and a higher ISO will cause more noise in the image.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  13. #1273

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    6-30-11

    I'm sorry it took me so long to get another post up. I actually did this one last night, input everything, previewed the post, make the little corrections and the exact second I hit "Submit Reply", Time Warner decided to turn off our network for repairs. Two hours worth of work, gone! @##$%#% I spent another 3 hours trying to get the internet working again, to no avail. As of this morning, still no access. However, I'm at work now and will do it from here. So with no further ado and griping...


    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” highlights a wonderful and really easy program for making your portraits look like they were taken by a pro and belong on the cover of a magazine. Today we take a look at Portrait Professional.

    This is the beginning page where you select your portrait to work on. Thankfully Charlotte was kind enough to let me use this picture of her I took while we were all waiting for the Parade during the last Mice Chat Photo Meet. Once you have opened the image to work on, check if it is a Female or Male.


    It walks you through each step one at a time telling you exactly what to do as you. First, you click on the outside corner of one eye.


    Then the outside corner of the other eye.


    Next, the tip of the nose.


    The corner of the mouth and then the other corner.


    After that, it zooms in on one eye for you to fine tune the shape of the eye and eyebrow. All you do is click on the little squares and move them into place over the eye, iris and eyebrow.


    After you do the other eye, it zooms in on the mouth and nose. Simply move the little boxes to cover the exact shape of the mouth and nose. It has an example on the side of each step to show you exactly what to do.


    Next, you move the little blue lines to outline the exact shape of the face.


    Then Portrait Professional does its magic. You will now see the before and after images side by side with the majority of the work done for you.


    At the top of the screen is the little “Touch Up Brush” button. You use the touch up brush to remove any unwanted blemishes. The really nice thing about this program is that all you have to do is put your curser over any button and a window will appear showing you exactly what it is for and how to use it. (very handy)


    Now over on the right of the screen is more controls than you can shake a stick at. There are way too many for me to go over each one here, so I’ll just pick a few of them to show some highlights.
    You can see in this photo the top of the slider menu which has controls for the shape of the head, eyes, eyebrows and mouth.


    Below those are the controls for the texture and color of the skin, thin wrinkles, fine lines, pores, textures and even the tan.


    You can see that simply by placing your mouse over any of the sliders it shows you what it is for and how it works.


    Next are numerous sliders just to adjust the eyes in every way possible. You can brighten the whites, pupils, irises, widen them, change the eye color and even add reflection in the eyes. Below the eye sliders are the ones for the lips.


    Below those are more sliders to control the lighting, shadows, shine and saturation of the skin.


    Once you’ve gone through all those, here is the before and after. If you are happy where you are, simply click on file and save as whatever you choose.


    Even though I rarely take pictures of people, I am really glad I bought this program. (the price was $60.00) Now that I know I have it and can do so many things, I plan on taking a lot more pictures of people.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011
    For a complete directory and direct links to all of these posts, please click here: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-50.html#post1056358940
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  14. #1274

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    7-1-11
    Today’s “Disneyland Photo Tip of the Day” goes sky high with some helpful tips to get that dark, moody sky that is becoming very popular these days. Mac Daddy is the true master of the moody sky but since he’s in Europe right now, I’ll do my best. I’m going to show 3 different techniques for enhancing a sky using different aspects and/or programs in conjunction with Photoshop Elements.

    I would normally use a picture that I took at Disneyland for this but I don’t get there often enough to catch the really cool, dramatic sunsets that appear on occasion. Once again, Mac Daddy is the king of those because he lives 5 minutes from Disneyland and whenever he sees a good looking sunset he runs into the park to photograph it. (lucky son of a gun)

    I will use this shot that I took of an amazing sunset on New Years Day 2010. First, open the photo in Photoshop Elements.


    Over in the Layers Panel, right click the image and Duplicate the Layer.


    Then in the Filters Tab, go to Other – High Pass.


    Once you click on High Pass,this is what you will see. Slide the Radius slider all the way to the left, down to 0, then slowly slide it to the right until you start to see some details of the edges of your image.


    When you have the Radius set where you want it, (it doesn’t take very much) click ok and then in the Layers Panel, you will have 3 choices of layer styles to change it to. Overlay, Soft Light and Hard Light. Soft Light has the softest effect, Overlay is kind of a light to medium effect and Hard Light is the most dramatic.


    This is what it looks like on Overlay (we are working on the contrast in the clouds to make them more dramatic.)


    Here is what it looks like on Hard Light. It is kind of hard to tell, but the darkness under the clouds is a little more pronounced and the clouds just look a tiny bit more angry.


    Now lets make the colors a bit warmer and more dramatic. At the top of the page click on Enhance – Adjust Color – Adjust Hue/Saturation.


    I selected the Red channel and increased the saturation of it to make the reds more pronounced.


    Now I want to add a Lens Flare to it. Go to Filter –Render – Lens Flare.


    A little lens flare goes a long way so I chose the one for the 50-300 zoom lens, set the brightness at 60% and moved thecross hairs over to the spot where the sun is on the horizon.


    And this is our result.


    Now, if you happen to have the OptikVerve Virtual Photographer Plugin that I showed you in a previous tutorial, we can do quite a bit more. Starting fresh, do the same as we did before by duplicating the layer. Then open the go to your Filter – Optik – Virtual Photographer and click through the options until you find one that you like. For this I chose Sunset.You can see how it completely saturated and warmed up the sky.


    This is what it gave us.


    Then I did the same thing by adding the Lens Flare to it. What a very quick and simple improvement.


    Now, for the most powerful and most dramatic effect, I am going to use Nik Color Efex Pro. If you have this fantastic program as a plug in for Photoshop Elements, simply go to Filter – Nik – Color Efex Pro.


    Down near the bottom of the selections is Tonal Contrast. Click on that one and use the sliders to really increase the contrast in the clouds. I left them a little light for this one. You can really make them dark and foreboding if you like to. That works well for black & white photos but the colors in the sky are the subject of this picture, so I left i ton the less dramatic side.


    After that, I went back into the Adjust Hue/Saturation mode and increased the Reds a bit.


    Next I added the lens flare again and here is ou rresult. Quite the difference isn’t it.


    Hopefully when I’m at Disneyland on the 3rd and 4th I’ll get some dramatic skies to play with and have some new Pretties for you.

    Happy Snapping
    © Michael Greening 2011

    For a complete directory and direct links to all of these posts, pleaseclick here: http://micechat.com/forums/disneyland-resort/140579-disneyland-photo-day-50.html#post1056358940
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com

  15. #1275

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,773

    Re: The Disneyland Photo of the Day...

    I'll be at Disneyland for the next 3 days shooting World of Color on Sunday, the Parade, Flag Retreat and Fireworks at Disneyland on Monday and some stuff for tutorials (hopefully) on Tuesday, so I'll be out of touch for a few days.
    In the mean time, here's a pretty for today.


    This was two shots taken in succession while riding the ride. They didn't quite line up, but that didn't matter because they were pretty close. I put them on top of each other in Photoshop Elements and changed the blend mode to Difference. Then I made some slight adjustments with the Hue and Temperature sliders to give the colors more personality.

    See you next week.

    Happy Snapping.
    Life is far too short for bland food!


    Flickr page: www.flickr.com/ringoffirehotsauce
    You Tube: www.youtube.com/ringoffireguy
    Facebook: http://profile.to/michaelgreening/
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/RingofFire1
    Personal website: www.mikeanddianes.com


Similar Threads

  1. [Pictures] First Disneyland Photo Set
    By mainstreetcm in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-15-2010, 01:08 PM
  2. [Pictures] Can you tell me where this photo was taken at Disneyland?
    By Sosai X in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-19-2009, 10:03 PM
  3. [Trip Report] Photo TR: Disneyland in HDR
    By sgtfox in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 11-22-2008, 01:45 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-17-2007, 11:12 AM
  5. Photo TR: Disneyland in the Philippines ... (that's right)
    By sir clinksalot in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 05-05-2006, 12:33 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •