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  1. #1

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    Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    "Each year since 1985, the editors of THE FUTURIST have selected the most thought-provoking ideas and forecasts appearing in the magazine to go into our annual Outlook report. Over the years, Outlook has spotlighted the emergence of such epochal developments as the Internet, virtual reality, the 2008 financial crisis and the end of the Cold War. But these forecasts are meant as conversation starters, not absolute predictions about the future. We hope that this report--covering developments in business and economics, demography, energy, the environment, health and medicine, resources, society and values, and technology--inspires you to tackle the challenges, and seize the opportunities, of the coming decade.

    With no further ado, THE FUTURIST Magazine releases its top ten forecasts for 2013 and beyond."




    THE FUTURIST Magazine Releases Its Top 10 Forecasts for 2013 and Beyond

    1. Neuroscientists may soon be able to predict what you’ll do before you do it.

    The intention to do something, such as grasp a cup, produces blood flow to specific areas of the brain, so studying blood-flow patterns through neuroimaging could give researchers a better idea of what people have in mind. One potential application is improved prosthetic devices that respond to signals from the brain more like actual limbs do, according to researchers at the University of Western Ontario. World Trends & Forecasts, Jan-Feb 2012, p. 10

    2. Future cars will become producers of power rather than merely consumers.


    A scheme envisioned at the Technology University of Delft would use fuel cells of parked electric vehicles to convert biogas or hydrogen into more electricity. And the owners would be paid for the energy their vehicles produce. Tomorrow in Brief, Mar-Apr 2012, p. 2

    3. An aquaponic recycling system in every kitchen?


    Future "farmers" may consist of householders recycling their food waste in their own aquariums. An aquaponic system being developed by SUNY ecological engineers would use leftover foods to feed a tank of tilapia or other fish, and then the fish waste would be used for growing vegetables. The goal is to reduce food waste and lower the cost of raising fish. Tomorrow in Brief, Nov-Dec 2011, p. 2

    4. The economy may become increasingly jobless, but there will be plenty of Work


    Many recently lost jobs may never come back. Rather than worry about unemployment, however, tomorrow’s workers will focus on developing a variety of skills that could keep them working productively and continuously, whether they have jobs or not. It’ll be about finding out what other people need done, and doing it, suggests financial advisor James H. Lee. “Hard at Work in the Jobless Future,” Mar-Apr 2012, pp. 32-33

    5. The next space age will launch after 2020, driven by competition and "adventure capitalists."


    While the U.S. space shuttle program is put to rest, entrepreneurs like Paul Allen, Elon Musk, Richard Branson, and Jeff Bezos are planning commercial launches to access low-Earth orbit and to ferry passengers to transcontinental destinations within hours. Challenges include perfecting new technologies, developing global operations, building new infrastructure, and gaining regulatory approval. “The New Age of Space Business,” Sep-Oct 2012, p. 17.

    6. The "cloud" will become more intelligent, not just a place to store data.


    Cloud intelligence will evolve into becoming an active resource in our daily lives, providing analysis and contextual advice. Virtual agents could, for example, design your family’s weekly menu based on everyone’s health profiles, fitness goals, and taste preferences, predict futurist consultants Chris Carbone and Kristin Nauth. “From Smart House to Networked Home,” July-Aug 2012, p. 30

    7. Corporate reputations will be even more important to maintain, due to the transparency that will come with augmented reality.


    In a "Rateocracy" as envisioned by management consultant Robert Moran, organizations’ reputations are quantified, and data could be included in geographically based information systems. You might choose one restaurant over another when your mobile augmented-reality app flashes warnings about health-department citations or poor customer reviews. “‘Rateocracy’ and Corporate Reputation,” World Trends & Forecasts, May-June 2012, p. 12

    8. Robots will become gentler caregivers in the next 10 years.


    Lifting and transferring frail patients may be easier for robots than for human caregivers, but their strong arms typically lack sensitivity. Japanese researchers are improving the functionality of the RIBA II (Robot for Interactive Body Assistance), lining its arms and chest with sensors so it can lift its patients more gently. Tomorrow in Brief, Nov-Dec 2011, p. 2

    9. We’ll harness noise vibrations and other "junk" energy from the environment to power our gadgets.

    Researchers at Georgia Tech are developing techniques for converting ambient microwave energy into DC power, which could be used for small devices like wireless sensors. And University of Buffalo physicist Surajit Sen is studying ways to use vibrations produced on roads and airport runways as energy sources. World Trends & Forecasts, Nov-Dec 2011, p. 9

    10. A handheld "breathalyzer" will offer early detection of infections microbes and even chemical attacks.


    The Single Breath Disease Diagnostics Breathalyzer under development at Stony Brook University would use sensor chips coated with nanowires to detect chemical compounds that may indicate the presence of diseases or infectious microbes. In the future, a handheld device could let you detect a range of risks, from lung cancer to anthrax exposure. Tomorrow in Brief, Sep-Oct 2012, p. 2

    All of these forecasts plus dozens more were included in Outlook 2013, which scanned the best writing and research from THE FUTURIST magazine over the course of the previous year.

  2. #2

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    But would Honda, Microsoft, Siemens, ABC, Yamaha, Taylor Morrison, SoCal Edison, or St. Josephs sponsor it?
    Many Bothans died to bring you these fastpasses.

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Inntoventions only works if you have someone as big as Walk Disney, Bill Gates or someone else both rich and respected because no one else will get people to put there idea's there for one because unless done right may bot appeal to the masses and two you need a lot of money to keep putting up new exhibits since future tech changes every year

  4. #4

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Thats why I think Tomorrowland just needs to become a Sci fi land. Its just too hard and too expensive to become a world of tomorrow. And now with todays tech everyone can see the future tech toys on tv or on their smartphones. They dont need a place like Disneyland to see it because by the time they get to Disneyland it will be yesterdays news.

  5. #5

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Retrocool has a good point but I'll go one step further.

    The World's Fair happened every few years and showcased technology ( amongst other things ) at the pace that data moved back in the day. That is to say, there was print and radio but no internet. The World's Fair that took place every few years was about on par for the rate that data moved back then.

    Today with the internet and all other forms of speedy communication it's just not practical to build an attraction based on < insert corporate sponsored item, like Honda's Asimo > because next month it's already old news. I'm not saying make a true "World's Fair" here, but how about Innoventions could become a monthly showcase of something new?

    I'm not saying to change every exhibit, every month. God forbid, the costs on that would be crazy.

    I am saying that every month at least one of the exhibits in there should rotate out in favor of whatever technological breakthrough just happened the month before. Whatever entity just trailblazed the aforementioned breakthrough might choose to sponsor a brief exhibit showcasing to the world what they just did.

    The world is changing so fast that it makes sense to have an exhibit that changes at that same speed. The speed at which Innoventions changes is the opposite of the high technology they claim to represent. It doesn't really change at all, at best there's just one occasional place for "spotlight on new product" and that's assuming anything is in that space when you visit.

    Innoventions would be better off as an open space with tables and screens and different reps from different places showing off what they did with science, TODAY. My own employer has hands in R&D for algae farming for biofuel, maglev trains, HV railcannons, medical testing strips to diagnose ailments, magnetic aircraft carrier launch systems, nuclear fission AND fusion, unmanned planes, power supplies, etc. I could see a lot of similar companies utilizing this place for PR and showcasing technology breakthroughs.
    Your first, your last, your only defense against the scum of the ethereal plane.

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    That's a darn good idea, fifthrider. Multiple exhibits across various sciences and technologies, but just one changes out every month, to feature the latest development in that field, to keep the cost factor down. That way, Innoventions is always changing, always keeping fresh, and staying relevant. If you have 12 such exhibits, they only need to change out once a year, whomever the corporate sponsor for that exhibit might be. That's actually really smart, I like that.

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    i would love that idea
    i also think the space of the the current innoventions is under underutilized

    Go visit my theme park website!!! http://kolbykonnection.com


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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Quote Originally Posted by fifthrider View Post
    Innoventions would be better off as an open space with tables and screens and different reps from different places showing off what they did with science, TODAY. My own employer has hands in R&D for algae farming for biofuel, maglev trains, HV railcannons, medical testing strips to diagnose ailments, magnetic aircraft carrier launch systems, nuclear fission AND fusion, unmanned planes, power supplies, etc. I could see a lot of similar companies utilizing this place for PR and showcasing technology breakthroughs.
    There is pretty much no reason any company making true scientific breakthroughs would choose to showcase their innovations at Disneyland. That's not where their market is. There are conferences for this kind of purpose. Whatever is showcased at Disney, in order to be relevant to the consumers so it's an attractive aspect for potential sponsors, needs to be the cutting edge of consumer technology. A family might be impressed by nuclear fission/fusion, but most of them will forget what happened in the exhibit. If you show them Google glasses for augmented reality (or whatever it actually is) or flexible cellphone displays, people will definitely be talking about it.

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Quote Originally Posted by G24T View Post
    But would Honda, Microsoft, Siemens, ABC, Yamaha, Taylor Morrison, SoCal Edison, or St. Josephs sponsor it?
    Well, thanks to "rateocracy", it will be easier for people like us to really get a handle on how these companies are doing business. Personally, I think that some of the real "Innoventions" are coming from individuals who are no longer reliant on these big corporations to get funding. (look into crowd funding sources like Kickstarter to get an idea of this).

  10. #10

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    Re: Cool Stuff You SHOULD See in Innoventions But Don't

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyjustin View Post
    There is pretty much no reason any company making true scientific breakthroughs would choose to showcase their innovations at Disneyland. That's not where their market is.

    ....aaaand that's exactly the thought that was boiling on the stove at the back of my mind. You're actually quite right. There's ultimately no good reason. I could offer one reason although I don't know if it qualifies as "good" or not. If it captures the minds and hearts of the public and voters then maybe they'd remember it at a time that could be helpful for science. If you sell the public on something then maybe when it comes time to read a bill and vote they'd think "Funding for R&D? Well, there was that nifty exhibit at Disneyland and they did make it sound pretty important..." The influence something like this would have would be an invisible hand at best.

    We can't forget that Walt himself had quite a role in promoting the space program. There was a time that funding for it teetered on happening or not. Walt's promotional films for ( what would become ) NASA ended up capturing the hearts and minds of people who let their elected representatives know that they wanted a space program to happen.

    I'm not sure if today's social and political climate is anywhere near those times so I have to acknowledge that you have a good point. I really can't think who would benefit by showing off their technology. Then again, how does Honda benefit by having Asimo there all the time? Come to think of it, I've yet to see Asimo actually working in Innoventions. Would we say that they benefit by just putting their company name out there for people to see? Does it influence car sales any more or less than a big R&D science and technology would influence people to vote for R&D bills that give them money? I have no idea.
    Your first, your last, your only defense against the scum of the ethereal plane.

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