Page 22 of 23 FirstFirst ... 121920212223 LastLast
Results 316 to 330 of 338
  1. #316

    • Senior Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    9,040

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Quote Originally Posted by DLFan1995 View Post
    Moore may have had an agenda for his film to enhance his career, but there are a lot of people who would take up a similar challenge just for the fun of it without expecting any monetary benefit from the results.
    "May have?" There's no chance that a guy who's been writing screenplays for ten years in a failed attempt to get on Hollywood's radar spends a million dollars to punk the Disney Corporation "just for the fun of it."


    Quote Originally Posted by Disneymike View Post
    Wouldn't this be considered "financial gain" if the filmmakers are now selling the soundtrack? Also, the use of the Warner Brothers scoring stage and a full blown symphony does not sound to me like this was some piddly production.
    Exactly. Which puts the lie to Moore's hypocritical attempts to play the "poor struggling independent artist" card.
    "With the acquisition of Marvel and now of Lucasfilm,
    Disney may have finally found the grail. You don't need
    imagination or art. All you need is a brand."

    - Neil Gabler


  2. #317

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    287
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    By the way, i bought the soundtrack and just finished to listen to it, and it's very good score for an indie movie, really. A mix, as they say, of influences from Hollywood composers of the golden era. And when you listen to it you realize that either the film is really good and the whole thing should be really good OR they have a good score going over terrible images (and i'm not talking here only about the photography but of course also about the story and the actors) and the whole thing will be not only terrible, but totally ridiculous. Because putting a score like this on something which is not at the height of it will be really, really, a bad joke. I don't think there is an in-between. Now that i've heard the soundtrack i'm more curious than ever to see this movie...

  3. #318

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    287
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    The Variety review and another one from Hollywood Elsewhere...

    Escape From Tomorrow

    By ROB NELSON

    Katelynn Rodriguez and Roy Abramsohn in "Escape from Tomorrow"


    A Mankurt Media presentation, in association with Soojin Chung, of a Gioia Marchese production. Produced by Marchese. Directed, written by Randy Moore.
    With: Roy Abramsohn, Elena Schuber, Katelynn Rodriguez, Jack Dalton, Danielle Safady, Annet Mahendru, Alison Lees-Taylor, Lee Armstrong, Amy Lucas, Stass Klassen.

    Shot without permits at Disney World, "Escape From Tomorrow" is a sneakily subversive exercise in low-budget surrealism and anti-corporate satire. Portraying the preeminent family fun park as a toxic treat that one regurgitates only if he's lucky, writer-director Randy Moore's debut feature comes on like a queasy-making "Carnival of Souls" for the Occupy era, its stylistic flaws seeming wholly forgivable in the context of David's sidesplitting poke at Goliath. The Mouse House couldn't possibly appreciate the joke, which is to say that, while "Tomorrow" may well prove unreleasable, its cult status will remain immortal.Moore's ingenious decision to shoot in black-and-white not only strips the Magic Kingdom of vitality from the get-go, but gives the pic an unmistakable kinship to '50s and '60s B-movie horror. Equal parts victim and villain, the man of "Tomorrow," Jim White (Roy Abramsohn), is a pudgy, horny, jobless shlub who, strolling the park with his wife (Elena Schuber) and kids (Katelynn Rodriguez, Jack Dalton), leers at teenage girls and drinks like a lush. To him, the Epcot Center globe resembles a "giant testicle," and his son's obsession with the Buzz Lightyear ride is a burden.
    Mr. White may be a creep, fixated on the sight of French girls (Danielle Safady, Annet Mahendru) sharing a banana, yet it's hard to say he deserves the waking nightmare that ensues. At first, his warped funhouse hallucinations seem attributable merely to sunstroke and too much time on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. But that doesn't explain the middle-aged sexpot (Alison Lees-Taylor) who seduces Jim with the help of her trippy heirloom pendant. Plus, there's a mysterious "cat flu" going around, and eventually the hapless patriarch is abducted as part of the Siemens corporation's nefarious experiments in mind control.
    Amazingly, "Escape From Tomorrow" steers clear of full-on camp, its vision of Americana's underbelly being enjoyably ridiculous but also brazenly unwholesome and disturbing. Lucas Lee Graham's luminous cinematography manages to put the viewer in a trance, despite the fact that the d.p. must have needed to keep the camera hidden for much of the shoot. (Gap-filling rear-projection work is digitally enabled, but looks like it could have been done 50 years ago.) Editing by Soojin Chung could be tighter on the whole, an impression furthered by the film's ineffective "intermission" past the one-hour mark.
    The sound design is unsettling, while Abel Korzeniowski's drippy, string-heavy score suitably channels both elevator Muzak and the spirit of '50s Hollywood.
    Camera (B&W, HD), Lucas Lee Graham; editor, Soojin Chung; music, Abel Korzeniowski; production designers, Sean Kaysen, Lawrence Kim; art directors, Arne Knudsen, Katie Wheelock; set decorator, Alma Gamino; costume designer, Gara Gambucci; sound (Dolby Digital), Sam Hamer, Jerry Wolfe; supervising sound editors, Paul Andre Fonarev, David Lankton; re-recording mixers, Paul Ratajczak, Mark Ettel; visual effects supervisors, Bruce Heller, Ryu Jaehwan; visual effects, 4th Creative Party; stunt coordinator, Mark Ginther; associate producer, Chung; assistant director, John David Denison; casting, Gioia Marchese. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (Next), Jan. 18, 2013. Running time: 103 MIN.


    Review from Hollywood Elsewhere:

    I finally saw Randy Moore's Escape From Tomorrow late yesterday afternoon. Set entirely in Disneyland and shot in black-and-white, it's basically a riff on The Shining with a vein of social criticism about pudgy, desperate, flabby-brained Americans indulging themselves with sugar, booze and fantasy while corporations control and exploit them like cattle. Is this not the central middle-class affliction of the 21st Century?
    The Shining parallels: (1) Weak, economically strapped dad has (or has had) an alcohol problem; (2) Dad and family submit to extended stay within a large, imposing, surreal realm (hotel/theme park) with gradually revealed ghosts and sexually tempting witches preying on dad, exploiting his barely suppressed lusts; (3) for spooky reasons two young girls openly invite a major character to come and play; (4) Dad succumbs to drink, is wounded and bloodied, goes loony and staggers around until the hotel/theme park finally eats him up and takes his soul.
    Escape is definitely an interesting sit. It's brave, absorbing, original as far as it goes, subversive, occasionally funny, and it has a thematic point. I was never bored and was/am glad I saw it. I hope that it finds some way to be seen by Joe Popcorn. I'm presuming that Disney attorneys will do what they can to block it.


    And one more from CNN which is not really a review but have an interesting story about how the crew were almost caught one day by Disney security... We also learn that apparently the film was shot using the excellent Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera.

    (CNN) -- Princesses transformed into ghouls. Psychedelic teacup rides. Simulated suicide. The world's most famous theme park turned into a vomitorium.

    And you thought this was the happiest place on earth.
    In "Escape From Tomorrow," the most buzzed-about movie out of this year's Sundance Film Festival, director Randall Moore presents Disney World as a dystopian hellscape and uses it as the backdrop for a descent into madness. Jim White (Roy Abramsohn) is on holiday with his wife and two children when he learns he's been fired from his job. As he reels from that news, his mental state progressively worsens as he and his family navigate the park.
    Shot in black and white, Disney's "attractions" become nightmarish specters as perceived by White's unstable mind.
    Now The Walt Disney Co. is weighing whether to quash the film or to let it slide -- not so much because of the disturbing imagery, but rather the way Moore made his movie. In an audacious act of filmmaking, he shot it almost entirely at Disney World and Disneyland -- all without Disney's knowledge or permission.
    After a screening of the film at Sundance, Moore answered questions from an enthusiastic audience, hinting at how he pulled off his cinematic subterfuge.
    Avoiding detection by Disney security took "a lot of planning," he said. "We were careful and cautious and tried not to draw too much attention to ourselves. But planning was the main thing."
    Abramsohn said shooting in such a stealthy fashion "was scary. ... It was exciting and fun."
    In a "director's statement" included in press materials for the film, Moore describes the origins of his film:
    "Heavily influenced by various strange outings I endured as a boy with my father -- who at the time lived in Orlando, Florida -- 'Escape From Tomorrow' is my personal attempt to make sense of what felt like a very artificial childhood, brought on by our cultural obsession with these fake, manufactured worlds of so-called fantasy."
    He adds, "I think the film is really about defining the word 'escape' and how so many American households seek it out in a yearly pilgrimage to a materialistic Mecca."
    It's a small, small dysfunctional world after all, in Moore's depiction.
    The director said he succeeded in making his film without tipping off Disney largely because of advances in camera technology. It's now possible to shoot high-quality video with what looks like, to the uncritical eye, a digital SLR camera.
    "(Digital) SLR's had just hit the market at that point," Moore said. "So we had the Canon 5D Mark II we could bring into the park and look like a tourist."
    Moore shot for 10 days at the Disney parks in Orlando, and for two weeks at Disneyland in Anaheim, California. (He filmed additional scenes off Disney property on a soundstage in Los Angeles and at a hotel in the LA area.)
    His crew and actors went unnoticed by Disney, until near the end of filming.
    "We almost got caught once. ... We were shooting in the entrance of the park and we had to do a few takes and basically they thought our team was just paparazzi and we were shooting a famous family (entering the park)."
    Moore said Disney security pulled his actors aside and demanded to know why they had entered and then re-entered the park within a seven-minute period.
    He said his crew took advantage of a passing parade to scatter while Abramsohn and his co-star, Elena Schuber, struggled to explain themselves.
    Abramsohn said he felt like he was "acting for his life." He said he told Disney security he and his "family" entered and then quickly left the park because they needed to reapply sunscreen.
    While his interrogator was temporarily distracted, he hid his microphone and mini tape-recorder -- used to record dialogue -- in his sock. If that had been discovered, the game would have been up.
    "It was very scary that day," Abramsohn admitted.
    Although Moore and company escaped Disney's notice then, the company now knows about them all too well.
    At the Sundance Q&A, an audience member claimed, "Disney is furious and they are going to sue."
    That may or may not be true. Disney told CNN "(We) are aware of the film" but "are not commenting at this time."
    Moore seems resigned to a possible lawsuit from Disney that might keep the film from ever being seen by the wider public, but he described "Escape From Tomorrow" as a passion project that he could not step away from, despite the legal risks.
    "It started off really small and it just kind of snowballed," he said. "I became obsessed. And at one point there was no turning back."
    Last edited by loaloa55; 02-01-2013 at 06:11 PM.

  4. #319

    • Senior Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    9,040

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Quote Originally Posted by loaloa55 quoting the Variety article:
    "...its stylistic flaws seeming wholly forgivable in the context of David's sidesplitting poke at Goliath. The Mouse House couldn't possibly appreciate the joke, which is to say that, while "Tomorrow" may well prove unreleasable, its cult status will remain immortal."
    Which is to say that if you're the Evil Disney Corporation, your property rights and IP rights are null and void, and those who punk you become public darlings.

    Let's face it, folks, the industry's closet hatred for Disney is the engine driving this media exercise in Beloved Badboyism fawning. Moore knows exactly who his audience is.
    "With the acquisition of Marvel and now of Lucasfilm,
    Disney may have finally found the grail. You don't need
    imagination or art. All you need is a brand."

    - Neil Gabler


  5. #320

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    446

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    If nothing else, the filmmaker has finally found his way to the fame he's always desired as the true scope of his deception is revealed. I don't know this Wu fellow, but my partner is the one who has the major's perspective on what, if anything, Disney might do with respect to Escape. We can all speculate for days and days and still come up very short on what the actual outcome will be. As Variety stated (and I have said ad nauseum), it remains to be seen whether the picture will ever see the release light of day.
    ~ Erik

  6. #321

    • Pilot EdForceOne
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    15,735

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Quote Originally Posted by WDWFigment View Post
    It's slightly more complicated than that, too. If this were an amicus brief penned by Wu, I'd agree with you. However, Wu presented an analysis for the LA Times.
    You do know the quotes in the LA Times were almost verbatium from a blog posting by Wu himself over a week ago right?

    Escape from Tomorrow, Disney World, and the Law of Fair Use : The New Yorker

    Quote Originally Posted by WDWFigment View Post
    In my experience, most case analyses (usually in the form of internal memos drafted to advise clients of probable outcomes or used by firms to determine whether it's pragmatic to represent a prospective client) are reasonably consistent among attorneys.
    And what is the attorney in question is one of those championing how the law is being interpreted... in the very same subject you are asking their opinion of?

    He's not just a subject matter expect - but a subject matter activist.

    Quote Originally Posted by WDWFigment View Post
    As mentioned, Wu is a respected expert in this area of law; I am not. He has practiced extensively in this area of law; I have not
    He's a scholar and professor - not practicing attorney. According to wikipedia's collection, he only practiced for 4 years.
    Check out my blog - Coreplex: Rambling from inside the Grid


    Am I evil? yes, I am
    Am I evil? I am man, yes, I am

    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyjeff View Post
    Disneyland was meant to be sipped not chug-a-lugged

  7. #322

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    614

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Wu is a practing attorney. He's just not a litigator. I don't have access to Westlaw or Lexis at home so I can't give precise info, but I looked him up last week and he had dozens of briefs indexed.

    The post to which you just linked is more persuasive in tone, but it's ultimately still analysis. He's definitely an activist, but unlike Limbaugh, he has the ability analyze objectively, too.

    It won't surprise me at all if Disney acts on this...my analysis is that it is not pragmatic to see a case on this matter through to trial.

  8. #323

    •   
    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,905

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    One thing to keep in mind is that there are likely three different cases that could happen from this:

    1. Disney vs. the filmmaker
    2. The involuntary background/bit player guests vs. the filmmaker
    3. SAG - AFTRA hitting the filmmaker for breach of contract

    All of those have very different arguments and angles. Even if Disney decides not to pursue this, the involuntary extras might - and they'd have a case, IMHO.

    And SAG, oh, I'd be surprised if they didn't hit him with a fine or sanction for this, even if they do it quietly and it never makes the press. Since the filmmaker DID use SAG - AFTRA actors for the leads he was

    a) working under a union contract;

    b) had an understanding of the protocols as such, including his requirements to actually hire/inform his extras and supporting players. Forget the whole "but vacation videos are on youtube and this is JUST LIKE that!"" argument here for a moment- the fact is that the guy was working under a union contract that had specific parameters. SAG has very detailed rules on how everyone who is in front of the camera is hired/recruited and treated and by signing a SAG contract for his leads, he agreed to follow those rules (and that was his choice - he could have done a film totally non-union - the fact that he hired experienced SAG actors is yet another indication of how professional and ambitious this project was).

    c) can't plead ignorance or a "oh I just didn't know!" angle.
    Last edited by Malina; 02-01-2013 at 08:12 PM.

  9. #324

    • Say no to screens
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    2741 Buena Vista St.
    Posts
    1,270

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    i think the soundtrack is very good
    Take a look at some of my models I make at kolbykonnection.com

  10. #325

    • Workin to live,lovin life
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    713

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Quote Originally Posted by TylerDurden View Post
    I don't really see how this post contributes anything. Like The International said, it's a film, it's art, it's not like there's a real-life stalker videotaping his exploits as he goes around messing with people (then I'd be on your side haha). Disney once hired a pedophile (the director of Jeepers Creepers, who's name escapes me) to direct a film. They released Pulp Fiction under their Miramax label. They have no problem with 'creepy' art.
    You asked a question about what the difference between a big budget movie or a home video or "Escape..." and how people are ok with one thing, but not another. I answered. Miramax isn't the same brand as Disney. That director was a mistake who didn't work again for years and Disney paid the price for that with bad media exposure.

    And again, it's how the actors grabbed unsuspecting people without permission that makes it creepy. There's a difference between Cruella and what this guy had his actors do.

    Disney's not some sacred company that can do no wrong. But you just seem to fail to understand why some people don't like this guy's methods for making his film.

  11. #326

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Paper St
    Posts
    1,359

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    "...he described it as a passion project he could not step away from..."

    enough of the babble about him being a monster destined to take Disney down. You guys are making him out to be some sort of evil genius but you're in reality giving a ton of credit to a guy you're trying to make out to be an idiot. Say whatever you want about his corporate money-making intentions and whatnot, he admits that it was something he wanted to do, and ended up entering into a festival.

  12. #327

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    446

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    The proof that this was a commercial production is overwhelming and it makes the producer's unscrupulous methods all the more seamy when you frame the subject matter against the backdrop of Disney's carefully groomed image.

    The manner in which the producers and director are presenting the work is in conflict with how documentaries are made (e.g., crew of more than 75 people, stated million dollar budget) and very clearly is not in keeping with a blogger / park enthusiast video with a crew of one or two and no narrative writing.

    SAG / AFTRA Talent
    IMDB Entry
    Sundance Official Entry
    Score Released in Commercially Available Formats

    I am curious to see the picture for myself, but let's please stop diluting ourselves by contextualizing the producer as an innocent auteur versus an evil corporate Goliath. What the filmmaker did is legally and ethically reprehensible.
    ~ Erik

  13. #328

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    446

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    "It started off really small and it just kind of snowballed," he said. "I became obsessed. And at one point there was no turning back."

    I've worked on a lot of film and television and even filmed an award-winning feature documentary. Anyone who sees a production through to completion and beyond must be passionate and driven - you cannot get to the finish line without that core energy. Breaking the rules (myriad violations of Disney's clearly-stated guest rules and regulations) and possibly the law (trespass) isn't an acceptable method of workflow for narrative production.

    A documentarian, especially one involved in exposing illegal or morally and ethically questionable activities, may be given a pass as a whistleblower (of sorts) for their incursions when they sidestep the law to achieve a result. There may be so much potential for PR damage, that those in the documentarian's sights often choose a passive response rather than pressing charges or launching a campaign to counter the allegations against them. Furthermore, there is seldom enough will on the part of prosecutors to pursue criminal charges against the filmmaker due to the intricacies of fair use and the fear of public backlash.

    The argument that this picture is protected under satire or parody is their only chance at a pass for their illegally-achieved, 25-day-long commercial production.
    ~ Erik

  14. #329

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,585

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Olson View Post
    "It started off really small and it just kind of snowballed," he said. "I became obsessed. And at one point there was no turning back."

    I've worked on a lot of film and television and even filmed an award-winning feature documentary. Anyone who sees a production through to completion and beyond must be passionate and driven - you cannot get to the finish line without that core energy. Breaking the rules (myriad violations of Disney's clearly-stated guest rules and regulations) and possibly the law (trespass) isn't an acceptable method of workflow for narrative production.

    A documentarian, especially one involved in exposing illegal or morally and ethically questionable activities, may be given a pass as a whistleblower (of sorts) for their incursions when they sidestep the law to achieve a result. There may be so much potential for PR damage, that those in the documentarian's sights often choose a passive response rather than pressing charges or launching a campaign to counter the allegations against them. Furthermore, there is seldom enough will on the part of prosecutors to pursue criminal charges against the filmmaker due to the intricacies of fair use and the fear of public backlash.

    The argument that this picture is protected under satire or parody is their only chance at a pass for their illegally-achieved, 25-day-long commercial production.
    I would imagine that there are quite a few commercial productions that have taken shortcuts and covered illegal situations, in industry and civil terms (skipping permits, excessive working hours, etc.), in order to get a production done. Even Disney has probably been in situations where, either due to inadvertent mistakes or intentional avoidance, they have done something that goes against the rules.

    Yes, situations like those expose them to potential penalties (and sometimes they even get caught), but if they see it as worth the risk, they may take it.

  15. #330

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    446

    Re: "Escape from Tomorrow" movie filmed in Disneyland secretly

    This was a willful, premeditated invasion of Disneyland, Walt Disney World and Epcot for the purpose of misappropriation and damaging use of their location(s), IP and images and sound of innocent guests and park employees.

    What these producers did is nothing like going into the 14th or 16th hour or getting into meal penalty as you try to make your day. In literally thousands of hours of production, I've never seen such activity on a legally run set.

    On a professional set, location releases are arranged prior to the prep and / or shooting crew arriving (let alone taking footage), personal and mass crowd releases are systematically managed through prominent postings at points of entry to a venue where images and sound are being taken. People in the background, who play too prominently in a scene, are immediately chased-down and corralled by a PA or intern to transition them from a mass-release background player to one who has signed an express, written agreement, granting rights to the producer for that more prominent role. At minimum, people are asked to state their name and city of residence into a rolling camera as a fallback.

    None of this was done on this movie because it was obtained illegally. But not just through poor production management - it was done this way through deep and premeditated planning. Masses of tickets were purchased, there was a communications system deployed and everything possible was done to make the crew disappear among the unwitting tourists and Disney employees.
    ~ Erik

Page 22 of 23 FirstFirst ... 121920212223 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Idea] Armchair Imagitition II: Escape from the Tower!
    By jesterjack in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-25-2010, 10:07 AM
  2. Whats your favorite disney song from a classic movie
    By rob3gd in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 08-27-2009, 07:11 AM
  3. Escape From The Haunted Mansion
    By Lost Boy in forum MiceChat Main Lounge
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-15-2008, 07:24 PM
  4. Escape From Critter Country: an idea to alleviate congestion
    By BigThunder in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 08-22-2006, 08:27 PM
  5. New toys from upcoming Pixar movie 'Cars' released.
    By OogieBoogie in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-04-2006, 01:17 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •