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  1. #16

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    The Haunted Mansion is a southern mansion since it is in New Orleans and Splash Mt is in the south because it is based on Song of the South. So there is nothing wrong with the setting.

    Maybe visually, because are there mountains in the south? Or is Chickapin supposed to be a hill, if so then there is a scale issue.
    Murphy,with that neck, is like E.T. in dragon form

  2. #17

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    Quote Originally Posted by mondo View Post
    Or is Chickapin supposed to be a hill, if so then there is a scale issue.
    ^this

    And it's just a little awkward to see so much fun happening just steps away from something so spooky.
    Many Bothans died to bring you these fastpasses.

  3. #18

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    Quote Originally Posted by mondo View Post
    The Haunted Mansion is a southern mansion since it is in New Orleans and Splash Mt is in the south because it is based on Song of the South. So there is nothing wrong with the setting...
    This.

  4. #19

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    Apparent themes and ideas are obvious in each of the park's land--adventure, exploration, mystery, fantasy, nostalgia, romance, optimism, wonder, et cetera. I think part of the reason why the park works as a whole is because of the way these ideas and themes intertwine and play off one another in each land. Same can be said for the transitions between the lands. There's a very distinct and highly poetic effective that's achieved with the juxtaposition of each land's distinct personality to another's. For instant, the transition between Fantasyland and Frontierland. Fantasyland is very much a celebration of our imagination and our creativity, our ability to believe in fantastical things and be innocent and childlike. These ideas transition well into Frontierland's setting, a setting that evokes our childlike wonder of nature and exploration and shows us how the imagination of man helped form a vision of a country from one edge of the sea to the other, how our ability to believe in fantastic things led us to believe we could persevere and realize this vision, and how the childlike energy and creativity portrayed in Fantasyland became the building blocks of new towns and opened the gates to experiences new wonders. Both celebrate the origins of who we are and the stories we have been told, revealing to us the power and importance of our imaginations and our constant belief that dreams and seemingly impossible visions can become realities. So, for me personally, having the two lands so close to each other simply makes sense. They aren't two completely isolated worlds, they are each a part of us and a part of our own story. The transitions between all lands can be described as similar, for each of Disneyland's lands convey a certain truth about the human spirit and we who are. This is part of the genius of Disneyland. The other brilliant aspect of the transitions is the "portal" affect that ohmyjustin mentioned. I think we all understand on some level, be it something we realize or something within our subconscious, that the entrance into each new land is really a portal to a new time in a new place. We are, indeed, time traveling each time we step into a new land. I don't think that is any awkward mistake of design, but a genius utilization of the three-dimensional theme park medium.

  5. #20

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    ^ Very well said!
    "With the acquisition of Marvel and now of Lucasfilm,
    Disney may have finally found the grail. You don't need
    imagination or art. All you need is a brand."

    - Neil Gabler


  6. #21

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    It took me awhile to find the link, because for some reason it didn't show with a different color in my browser. But the original article is really fascinating and well done. Thank you OP for sharing it.

    I can't make any comparison to Disney World myself, as I've never been there. I need to remedy that one day, but convincing the new GF to fly across the country with me to visit a "kids theme park" is probably not going to happen in the near future.
    Last edited by Steveman; 02-24-2013 at 04:36 PM.

  7. #22

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    I've never actually been but I've been told Tokyo Disneyland has very awkward transitions between lands. I've never seen Tokyo labeled as charming or intimate.

  8. #23

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    I would like to request pics of all the lands' transitions.
    Murphy,with that neck, is like E.T. in dragon form

  9. #24

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    Never really thought that deeply into it. Disneyland is just a thematic masterpiece in itself. I mean, why does the Matterhorn rest in Fantasyland? I don't know, but somehow they make it fit alright in there, almost as if its a transition between Fantasyland and Tomorrowland.

    As for Haunted Mansion next to Splash Mountain, I don't know, they are both southern themed areas so the transition is smooth to me. Splash Mountain is associated greatly with bears and next to it is Winnie the Pooh and the Hungry Bear restaurant. It is sort of seamless to me. Haunted Mansion is also kind of off by itself away from the main area of New Orleans Square. Why is Pirates in the middle of New Orleans Square and connected to Blue Bayou? I don't know but they blend it well. The ride begins basically in the swamp in New Orleans and leads to the Caribbean. It's done well I think.

  10. #25

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    Re: Disneyland's charm partly due to awkward transitions between lands?

    Quote Originally Posted by mondo View Post
    I would like to request pics of all the lands' transitions.
    Click on the original article, he has a lot of them.

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