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  1. #16

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    I would personally hate to have a ticket book system.

    Reasons:
    ~There would still be an admission fee, plus the cost of parking, plus the cost of tickets, it could wind up costing you more than a single day ticket

    ~If they used actual tickets, they would have to add in the cost of printing, distributing, and collecting the tickets

    ~If they used a card or wristband system how would you keep track of what "tickets" you have left if you didn't purchase a ticket for everything

    ~Rides with cheaper tickets would become more crowded and rides with expensive tickets would become deserted

    ~It would be a cheap atmosphere, like going to the fair, rather than a vacation like going to Disneyland

  2. #17

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    I also would not like this idea. On an average family day trip, we get to experience about 32 attractions from open to close - with taking time for meals and shopping and people watching in the middle of the day. So for our $92 tickets (each), we are paying about $2.88 per attraction, with admission being $0. Unless the ticket books will mean free admission and less than $3 per attraction (in today's market mind you), it wouldn't make sense for us financially.

  3. #18

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Yes. Without any questions.

  4. #19

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlawwhiskey View Post
    I would personally hate to have a ticket book system.

    Reasons:
    ~There would still be an admission fee, plus the cost of parking, plus the cost of tickets, it could wind up costing you more than a single day ticket
    You pay for all of these things now....with a ticket book system it may cost you more (say, if you're an E ticket glutton) or it could cost you less (if you just like to ride a few attractions per day)

    ~If they used actual tickets, they would have to add in the cost of printing, distributing, and collecting the tickets
    A valid point I suppose.

    ~If they used a card or wristband system how would you keep track of what "tickets" you have left if you didn't purchase a ticket for everything
    I am sure there's "an app for that"

    ~Rides with cheaper tickets would become more crowded and rides with expensive tickets would become deserted
    That's...um, kinda the point.......

    ~It would be a cheap atmosphere, like going to the fair, rather than a vacation like going to Disneyland
    When Walt was running the show they had ticket books.....back then Ambassadors, Presidents, Kings and Queens visited the park on a regular basis.
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  5. #20

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyjeff View Post
    You pay for all of these things now....with a ticket book system it may cost you more (say, if you're an E ticket glutton) or it could cost you less (if you just like to ride a few attractions per day)

    A valid point I suppose.

    I am sure there's "an app for that"


    There might be an app for that, but what about people (like myself) who don't use smartphones, would they be excluded from using the card or band system because they don't have apps. Sounds silly to me.

    That's...um, kinda the point.......

    Actually, you didn't get the point, Space Mountain could be like the most expensive ride and be $10 or $15, and people won't want to pay that to ride Space Mountain, so the popular rides could become deserted. A ride like Casey Jr Circus Train could be around $3 and draw a larger crowd because more families could afford them.

    When Walt was running the show they had ticket books.....back then Ambassadors, Presidents, Kings and Queens visited the park on a regular basis.

    Places like Boomers offer one day "tickets" which save you money on the price of buying tickets individually by allowing you to do everything. They are in the form of wristbands. If Disney were to institute this, it would be the same thing as a regular day ticket we already pay for. I would hate to see Disneyland charge modern prices for each attraction, since things like an Astro Jump are $6 a jump other places, I can only imagine what they would charge for Space Mountain.

  6. #21

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Weird, I must have clicked something incorrectly when I replied, so my response got mixed in with the last reply. Here is my complete response:
    There might be an app for that, but what about people (like myself) who don't use smartphones, would they be excluded from using the card or band system because they don't have apps. Sounds silly to me.

    Actually, you didn't get the point, Space Mountain could be like the most expensive ride and be $10 or $15, and people won't want to pay that to ride Space Mountain, so the popular rides could become deserted. A ride like Casey Jr Circus Train could be around $3 and draw a larger crowd because more families could afford them.

    Places like Boomers offer one day "tickets" which save you money on the price of buying tickets individually by allowing you to do everything. They are in the form of wristbands. If Disney were to institute this, it would be the same thing as a regular day ticket we already pay for. I would hate to see Disneyland charge modern prices for each attraction, since things like an Astro Jump are $6 a jump other places, I can only imagine what they would charge for Space Mountain.

  7. #22

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlawwhiskey View Post
    Actually, you didn't get the point, Space Mountain could be like the most expensive ride and be $10 or $15, and people won't want to pay that to ride Space Mountain, so the popular rides could become deserted. A ride like Casey Jr Circus Train could be around $3 and draw a larger crowd because more families could afford them.
    I'm not big on the idea of ticketing rides. But this is not a real objection to them.

    If they priced a ride so high that it did not get ridership, they would realize the error and lower the price. Rides would be priced such that quantity of rides demanded for the ride matched the supply of rides on the attraction (its capacity.) That's supply and demand at work. And I think Disney understands how to set and adjust pricing of its products such that the market clears. In fact, they are experts at doing exactly that.

    I would point out, that even under the current system there are markets for the attractions. Supply is the capacity of the attractions. But because there are no ticket books, demand is brought in line with supply through rationing, wherein the price is the duration of wait in line. This is the natural consequence of having a marginal price for a ride be nominally zero; demand outstrips supply and a rationing line results.

  8. #23

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlawwhiskey View Post
    [I]There might be an app for that, but what about people (like myself) who don't use smartphones, would they be excluded from using the card or band system because they don't have apps. Sounds silly to me.
    Maybe a kiosk or, and I know this sounds really radical, they could just print up the books like Walt did.

    Actually, you didn't get the point, Space Mountain could be like the most expensive ride and be $10 or $15, and people won't want to pay that to ride Space Mountain, so the popular rides could become deserted. A ride like Casey Jr Circus Train could be around $3 and draw a larger crowd because more families could afford them.
    No, like Walt, I am sure they could price things based on consumer demand. If Casey got too crowded, they could bump it up a catagory (ie, charge more). If Space got too deserted, they could bump it down.

    I can only imagine what they would charge for Space Mountain.
    Enough to discourage 1+ hour long lines but not so much that no line ever develops.....it's not rocket science (pun so intended)
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  9. #24

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    It would be easier to go paperless (treehuggers!), and allow for machines to read cards to see what is left.
    Heck, they wouldn't even have to classify attractions in some arbitrary fashion as "A-E tickets."
    You pay some amount (say $50). It goes on your card.
    You swipe it at the entrance of an attraction.
    Your card gets debited the price of entrance for that moment in time -- so in a newly created "off-season," attraction entrance would be lower, while in high-season there would be higher attraction entrance prices.

    My "cafeteria" has a no-register set-up. You "order" and pay for your meals at a "kiosk" then the cook makes your meal. Even the "TAP" card on the LA Subways is using advanced technology that Disneyland hasn't adopted.

    This method could still allow the use of an "AP Program" An AP would only get one into the park, not onto the attractions, so it would cost a lot less. Say, $200 a year, while entrance for single day would be, say, $30.
    "Here You Leave the World of California Today and Enter the World of, um, er, California Today."

  10. #25

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Out here at Disney World it is really bad. For instance when I take my nieces to DCA, I shouldn't have to pay for everything they won't do:
    The Bakery Tour
    Character Close-Up
    California Screamin'
    Grizzly River Rapids
    Golden Zephyr
    Goofy's Sky School
    Luigi's Flying Tires
    It's tough to be a bug
    Tower of Terror
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  11. #26

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Again, you don't have to. Just don't go. Take them to the beach. It's free, except for the parking. But even that can be free if you know where to go.
    "Here You Leave the World of California Today and Enter the World of, um, er, California Today."

  12. #27

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyjeff View Post
    Maybe a kiosk or, and I know this sounds really radical, they could just print up the books like Walt did.



    No, like Walt, I am sure they could price things based on consumer demand. If Casey got too crowded, they could bump it up a catagory (ie, charge more). If Space got too deserted, they could bump it down.



    Enough to discourage 1+ hour long lines but not so much that no line ever develops.....it's not rocket science (pun so intended)
    Bingo x 3. What folks forget is that a Disneyland ticket book wasn't so much viewed as individual tickets, but as a representation of your day at Disneyland. As a result, a visit to Disneyland tended to be more an experience that included many sub-experiences, rides among them, rather than a gallop-across-the-park consumption of primarily rides that are mass-marketed to sardine-can crowds via aggressively marketed discounted gate media (APs) and the Quick!-Quick!-Get-'Em-Before-They're-Gone Fastpass system.

    The essence of how ticket books would make the Disneyland experience more magical, not less, is in the quote (now in flynnibus' sig) from sleepyjeff's post in the 2010 thread, "Return of the Ticket Books....is it just a matter of time?"...


    Disneyland was meant to be sipped, not chug-a-lugged.




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  13. #28

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by sediment View Post
    Again, you don't have to. Just don't go. Take them to the beach. It's free, except for the parking. But even that can be free if you know where to go.
    It isn't about the cost, it is about what I perceive the value of the experience to be. I will gladly pay 200.00 for Broadway Show tickets if I see value. And I would gladly pay 90+ a day for a theme park if I saw value. The problem is, that perceived value has disappeared, and I am at the point where I don't see it.
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  14. #29

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by sediment View Post
    It would be easier to go paperless (treehuggers!), and allow for machines to read cards to see what is left.
    Heck, they wouldn't even have to classify attractions in some arbitrary fashion as "A-E tickets."
    You pay some amount (say $50). It goes on your card.
    You swipe it at the entrance of an attraction.
    Your card gets debited the price of entrance for that moment in time -- so in a newly created "off-season," attraction entrance would be lower, while in high-season there would be higher attraction entrance prices.

    My "cafeteria" has a no-register set-up. You "order" and pay for your meals at a "kiosk" then the cook makes your meal. Even the "TAP" card on the LA Subways is using advanced technology that Disneyland hasn't adopted.

    This method could still allow the use of an "AP Program" An AP would only get one into the park, not onto the attractions, so it would cost a lot less. Say, $200 a year, while entrance for single day would be, say, $30.
    Who would pay $30 a day for nothing included. Seems a little ridiculous to me.

  15. #30

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    Re: Should we go back to the Ticket Book system?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnlawwhiskey View Post
    Who would pay $30 a day for nothing included. Seems a little ridiculous to me.
    We used to go to the park after my mom got off work. She would pay $3 or $5 to get in, we would be charged $2 or so, and then we'd get one or two rides from the ticket book after she was finished shopping at the Pendleton Woolens store.

    Now that I am old and feeble and can't go on many rides, I could easily see paying $25 to get in, going on a ride or three and then doing some souvenir shopping as my "day" before returning to the hotel pool.
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