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Thread: The State of DL

  1. #151

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    Re: The State of DL

    duplicate post
    Last edited by Steveman; 07-01-2013 at 12:48 AM.

  2. #152

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    Customer service really can be an art and a learned skill, especially at a place like Disneyland. Smiling and being polite can be a given, but being able to react quickly, handle different guests issues, defuse agitated guests and learn the protocol on how to handle things can be really tricky. The interactions you have in day to day life with the people you meet aren't always going to be the same as the interactions that a CM or other customer service worker has with the thousands of guests they handle.

    And back to the issue of the employers...if a CM is overworked and is doing a job that should really be handled by two or three people, they might be unable to offer the same level of customer service just by default.
    Many of us have had customer service experience on a large scale at some point, myself included. No one ever said it was an easy job. Personally I never want to do that again in my life. But to make it sound so complex is disingenuous, in my opinion. Running a register at the Hungry Bear, for example, is not much different than running a register at any other high volume business and does not require an extensive training curriculum. And I don't think the OP, or anyone else is expecting perfection. Just some common courtesy.

  3. #153

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Steveman View Post
    Many of us have had customer service experience on a large scale at some point, myself included. No one ever said it was an easy job. Personally I never want to do that again in my life. But to make it sound so complex is disingenuous, in my opinion. Running a register at the Hungry Bear, for example, is not much different than running a register at any other high volume business and does not require an extensive training curriculum. And I don't think the OP, or anyone else is expecting perfection. Just some common courtesy.
    There's a pretty marked difference between running a register at DLR and running one at CVS, just in terms of the volume, types of guests and types of situations that might arise. It's a tourist industry rather than one based solely on retail. If CMs aren't reminded of that, they won't get it.

    Let's say you're an 18 year old new CM. You've worked at McDonald's for two years, and you've never experienced the type of "stellar customer service" people expect at Disney. Unless someone - say, a lead or a training course instructor - impresses upon you that the expectations are higher, you won't necessarily get it. If you go in with the idea that it's like your McDonald's job there's no hope that you will raise the bar.

    When I was in customer service, we had seminars that went over everything from the types of greetings we should give to the words we shouldn't use (example: at the time, terminology was changing and we were admonished against using the word "handicapped.") to the specific ways we should and shouldn't address disabled guests. The fact that the company emphasized it meant that we saw it as more important.

    If Disney took the time and energy to reinforce pleasant customer service skills with their CMs, the quality WOULD go up. Right now, they aren't taught to see it as anything of great importance.
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  4. #154

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by The International View Post
    Well, the point also remains that when you have tens of thousands of CMs in a tiny place, not everyone is going to be perfect 100% of the time. It sucks but that's life. The point is, you move on and be polite about it;
    And make sure to report those people who are being rude or are performing sub-par to City Hall. Maybe finding out they had a negative comment card will be a wake-up call, maybe not. However, if one worker has enough of them it will certainly be a wake-up call to the company to re-evaluate the employment status of that individual. And rightfully so.
    "You can cut me off from the civilized world. You can incarcerate me with two moronic cellmates. You can torture me with your thrice daily swill, but you cannot break the spirit of a Winchester. My voice shall be heard from this wilderness and I shall be delivered from this fetid and festering sewer."

  5. #155

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Steveman View Post
    ... And I don't think the OP, or anyone else is expecting perfection. Just some common courtesy.
    Unfortunately common courtesy, much like common sense, is far from common these days.

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  6. #156

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    The following was posted last year by an experienced DLR Attraction CM and Attraction Trainer, and bears repeating:
    Therer's no training, because they're supposed to be hiring people who are naturally adept at customer service (though they might be raw at this particular job). Either they can't find these people to hire, or they are really not very good at determining which is which. I'm guessing more the former.
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  7. #157

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    Re: The State of DL

    Over the decades, the books, college papers and corporate seminars that have discussed, analyzed and imitated Van France's innovative "University of Disneyland" are legion.

    Sadly, the world-famous training philosophies and procedures he developed in Disneyland's first decade have largely been tossed & trashed by the Eisger regime.
    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 07-01-2013 at 08:55 AM.
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  8. #158

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Steveman View Post
    Many of us have had customer service experience on a large scale at some point, myself included. No one ever said it was an easy job. Personally I never want to do that again in my life. But to make it sound so complex is disingenuous, in my opinion. Running a register at the Hungry Bear, for example, is not much different than running a register at any other high volume business and does not require an extensive training curriculum. And I don't think the OP, or anyone else is expecting perfection. Just some common courtesy.
    Exactly. A smile and "have a nice day" isn't that difficult to manage. And it's true, I'm not expecting perfection--I'm not even upset about not getting smiles or greetings...just surprised because DL used to be THE place to go for stellar customer service, and I simply noticed that that isn't the case anymore.

  9. #159

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    There's a pretty marked difference between running a register at DLR and running one at CVS, just in terms of the volume, types of guests and types of situations that might arise. It's a tourist industry rather than one based solely on retail. If CMs aren't reminded of that, they won't get it.
    Yes, there is a difference. At CVS, the cashier's sole job should be to ring the customer up, and get them on their way, because people at CVS are there to get things done and do it quickly and conveniently.

    At DL, people are paying hundreds, if not thousands, to have a fun vacation. The focus of the CMs should not be efficiency at DL (like it is at CVS, although of course incompetent CMs who take forever are also inexcusable), it should be customer service.

    The example about one CM doing two or three CMs jobs and not being able to provide ample service--that's a terrible example. At CVS, sure I'd buy that, but at Disneyland, if you have to do more work than you should, your focus should still be on the guests, not on getting as much work done as possible. It used to be that, while getting the job done was obviously important, catering to the guests and keeping them happy was of the utmost importance. Say a cart stocker has to drop off ice cream to the nearest cart because they're completely out--you're arguing that it's ok for them to blow everyone off because they have a job to do. However, in a proper service environment, the CM would first take care of the guests should they need anything and be polite.

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    say you're an 18 year old new CM. You've worked at McDonald's for two years, and you've never experienced the type of "stellar customer service" people expect at Disney. Unless someone - say, a lead or a training course instructor - impresses upon you that the expectations are higher, you won't necessarily get it. If you go in with the idea that it's like your McDonald's job there's no hope that you will raise the bar.
    That's no excuse. Even the good CMs came from somewhere that was not held to the same standard as Disneyland--even if it's their first job, they've been to McDonald's and know the 'passable' way to give service. CMs should take pride in their job and want to go the extra mile. Whether it's their fault for not being motivated to go above and beyond and give people a great time, or the company's for not motivating them to do so, it doesn't really matter, because it's the paying guests that are having to deal with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    When I was in customer service, we had seminars that went over everything from the types of greetings we should give to the words we shouldn't use (example: at the time, terminology was changing and we were admonished against using the word "handicapped.") to the specific ways we should and shouldn't address disabled guests. The fact that the company emphasized it meant that we saw it as more important.
    If Disney took the time and energy to reinforce pleasant customer service skills with their CMs, the quality WOULD go up. Right now, they aren't taught to see it as anything of great importance.
    Disney should take that step then. But still, you'd think that the employees would have the common courtesy to at least say hello and smile. I don't need stellar service, when I go to the parks I know what I'm doing and I'm there to have fun. But I've still noticed the slip in standards, and, like Attic Haunt said, the fact that common courtesy just doesn't seem to be that common anymore.

  10. #160

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    Re: The State of DL

    From my own experiences growing up around the parks (worked for Knott's at one point, had/have several friends working for The Mouse currently), they're just not offering enough money.

    The demands on CMs are higher than any other job of equivalent pay locally. You can go get a job stocking at Target starting at the same as Disney or higher, and not have the "on call" status where future hours get docked for inability to show up on short notice bonus shifts. Where extra time caused by the company is paid for, not included in your "you should expect it take take three hours to get from the company parking lot to work" lecture.

    Disneyland used to be a gold standard startup job in OC. You knew you were going to get paid better than your other friends who weren't working there, you knew that the standards were high and likely were bragging that you met them when you talk to your friends from Knott's, you had a job that felt worth keeping. Then the last twenty years hit, and that's pretty much In-and-Out Burger now.
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  11. #161

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by BogLurch View Post
    Disneyland used to be a gold standard startup job in OC. You knew you were going to get paid better than your other friends who weren't working there, you knew that the standards were high and likely were bragging that you met them when you talk to your friends from Knott's, you had a job that felt worth keeping. Then the last twenty years hit, and that's pretty much In-and-Out Burger now.
    This.

    Except that the last time I checked, In-and-Out's starting pay was higher.
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  12. #162

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    This.

    Except that the last time I checked, In-and-Out's starting pay was higher.
    In N Out starts their employees at ten an hour.
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  13. #163

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by BogLurch View Post
    From my own experiences growing up around the parks (worked for Knott's at one point, had/have several friends working for The Mouse currently), they're just not offering enough money.

    The demands on CMs are higher than any other job of equivalent pay locally. You can go get a job stocking at Target starting at the same as Disney or higher, and not have the "on call" status where future hours get docked for inability to show up on short notice bonus shifts. Where extra time caused by the company is paid for, not included in your "you should expect it take take three hours to get from the company parking lot to work" lecture.

    Disneyland used to be a gold standard startup job in OC. You knew you were going to get paid better than your other friends who weren't working there, you knew that the standards were high and likely were bragging that you met them when you talk to your friends from Knott's, you had a job that felt worth keeping. Then the last twenty years hit, and that's pretty much In-and-Out Burger now.
    While Disney should pay more for the demands that it is claimed are put on their workers, that is no excuse for poor performance. The workers agreed on a rate of pay when they signed up, they need to live up to their end of the agreement and perform their duties. If the rate of pay wasn’t enough, they should not have excepted the position.
    "You can cut me off from the civilized world. You can incarcerate me with two moronic cellmates. You can torture me with your thrice daily swill, but you cannot break the spirit of a Winchester. My voice shall be heard from this wilderness and I shall be delivered from this fetid and festering sewer."

  14. #164

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by calsig31 View Post
    While Disney should pay more for the demands that it is claimed are put on their workers, that is no excuse for poor performance. The workers agreed on a rate of pay when they signed up, they need to live up to their end of the agreement and perform their duties. If the rate of pay wasn’t enough, they should not have excepted the position.
    Yes and no.

    Disney is no longer willing to pay a premium rate for employees. Instead, they offer rock bottom wages and less than perfect working conditions in fairly stressful environments.

    With that comes what you should expect from dredging the bottom of the barrel. Workers with a developed sense of responsibility are not going to be willing to stay at an entry-level minimum wage job with little chance of advancement when any other option pays more. For years I've been reading complaints here about/from TDA about the lower amount of applicants and the lowered standards that they now face on hiring days, and that's something else that is directly traceable to the low wages.

    You can't expect high-caliber performance from low-caliber jobs. At least not without severe disappointment.

    So yeah, there's a good chunk that could be solved be CMs being nicer etc., but there's no real incentive to. What is the worst that is going to happen? Unless you're a fan, getting fired by Disney means you're free to go pursue some other dead end minimum wage job that is likely to be easier and treat you better.
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  15. #165

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    Re: The State of DL

    Quote Originally Posted by calsig31 View Post
    While Disney should pay more for the demands that it is claimed are put on their workers, that is no excuse for poor performance. The workers agreed on a rate of pay when they signed up, they need to live up to their end of the agreement and perform their duties. If the rate of pay wasn’t enough, they should not have excepted the position.
    On the other hand in the real world if you want people to behave a certain way at work you need to pay them accordingly. A bunch of teenagers getting minimum wage are not going to be as well-behaved (for lack of a better word) as waiters at high-end restaurants, regardless of how much you require it.

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