Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 113
  1. #91

    • Banned User
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    131

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Quentin View Post
    It wasn't originally part of mexico. It was for thousands of years home to Native Americans. Then part of Spain for 100's and only near the end from 1821 to 1850 part of Mexico. Other than that I agree with you.
    Although it wasn't originally part of Mexico, the difference between Mexican culture and American culture is that the native culture (the natives that resided in in N. America) is very prevalent in Mexican culture. Mexicans embrace our native ancestry that runs in our blood, and it's obvious in a lot of our cultural traditions. So when saying it was part of Mexico, it's acknowledging the native presence in the area. Mexico comes from the word "Mexica" which what the people known as the Aztecs, called themselves.

    And there IS a difference between Spanish culture, and Mexican culture. Although the european influence is obvious, the differences are also obvious in the ways I stated above. Spanish culture didn't involve any native traditions, in the way the Mexican culture does.

  2. #92

    • Selfie Expert
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    7,721

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    I read through about half this thread before deciding upon my opinion:

    Throw in a Three Amigos meet and greet.


    Thank you to Poisonedapples for my awesome signature!
    KellyMcG86's Disneyland To Do List

  3. #93

    • Just another Disney fan..
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Near "The Original"
    Posts
    954

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by KellyMcG86 View Post
    I read through about half this thread before deciding upon my opinion:

    Throw in a Three Amigos meet and greet.

    Three Amigos? You mean Chevy Chase, Martin Short and Steve Martin?

  4. #94

    • Just another Disney fan..
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Near "The Original"
    Posts
    954

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by G24T View Post
    Well, in Golden Dreams they featured Japanese passport brides and Chinese railroad workers being blown up. They also make terrible Chinese food at the Lucky Fortune Cookery as well. In my Asian-American opinion I'd much rather leave it as is, maybe closing the Fortune Cookery all together too.
    This is exactly the point I've been sarcastically been making that it appears only a few people posting have picked up on.

    The OP is calling for something that was already a part of DCA 1.0 which was a FAILURE!

    I'm guessing some here are too young to remember what DCA use to be?

    I say don't repeat the mistakes made in the past by trying to be culturally inclusive. Besides it being near impossible to fairly represent all the cultural/ethnic groups properly, it has been proven that the concept is NOT a popular idea for a Disney theme park.

  5. #95

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    119

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by BogLurch View Post
    I wonder if there might not also be (at least as an excuse) an aversion to copying Knott's too closely?

    Fiesta Village. Indian Trails. Ghost Town. They cover an extensive amount of CA's history in broad strokes in ways that are built in to the park (to some extent).
    Knott's, in their quest to become a mini Magic Mountain sacrificed Fiesta Village. What's left of it is totally unrecognisable amid the half dozen roller coasters.

  6. #96

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    133

    Thumbs down Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nikefutbolero View Post
    Although it wasn't originally part of Mexico, the difference between Mexican culture and American culture is that the native culture (the natives that resided in in N. America) is very prevalent in Mexican culture. Mexicans embrace our native ancestry that runs in our blood, and it's obvious in a lot of our cultural traditions. So when saying it was part of Mexico, it's acknowledging the native presence in the area. Mexico comes from the word "Mexica" which what the people known as the Aztecs, called themselves.

    And there IS a difference between Spanish culture, and Mexican culture. Although the european influence is obvious, the differences are also obvious in the ways I stated above. Spanish culture didn't involve any native traditions, in the way the Mexican culture does.
    Except...

    Aztecs were never in California.

    Name:  800px-Aztecexpansion.png
Views: 136
Size:  120.4 KB

    You defeat your own argument.

    I should also point out that "American" culture does not disregard Native American culture. Maybe yours does, but then again you're painting with a very broad defensive/emotionally charged brush.

  7. #97

    • I'm from Canada eh!
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,140

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    DCA's theme is tough to nail down at the best of times.

  8. #98

    • Not on the Jedi Council
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    678

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by MTdizzle94 View Post
    I think a way to add to the Latin presence would be a small land with a Zorro stunt show and a Three Caballeros dark ride.
    I'd be cool with that.

    From my California history class at UCLA, California was sparsely populated when it became a state. There were fewer than 5,000 non-natives in the state in 1848. Why? Because the state had only two natural harbors for boats (San Diego and San Francisco) and a mountain wall on the east side. There was no interstate, no airports, no railroads, and until the silver and gold rushes started, there was little reason to come out here.

    It was pretty to look at because the natives took care of the land (controlled fires and a dedication to live in peace with the land), but that was about it. It took the railroads to develop LA, where the trains could bring people safely here for a dollar and then export oranges back east so they could become orange juice, an almost exotic drink back in the 1850s. LA was pretty much a sleepy desert community (1850 population: about 1,500 people) until developers created tract housing (1880 pop: 11,000 people, more or less; 100,000 by 1900).

    That said, I would have no problem with a Chinatown wharf in DCA nearly what is already called San Francisco Street, or adding a Zorro show or even a pueblo or Native American section maybe in that kinda dead zone behind San Francisco and on the road to GRR.

  9. #99

    • Member
    • Online

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Anaheim
    Posts
    839

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by KellyMcG86 View Post
    I read through about half this thread before deciding upon my opinion:

    Throw in a Three Amigos meet and greet.

    Earlier this year

  10. #100

    • Unhelpful User
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    935

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger55 View Post
    I say don't repeat the mistakes made in the past by trying to be culturally inclusive. Besides it being near impossible to fairly represent all the cultural/ethnic groups properly, it has been proven that the concept is NOT a popular idea for a Disney theme park.
    That's funny, all this time I thought Epcot was incredibly popular

  11. #101

    • Banned User
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,497

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by The International View Post
    That's funny, all this time I thought Epcot was incredibly popular
    Yes, popular to the non-natives. This post is arguing for Latin presense to attract Latins. This doesn't really work. It might work to attract the non-Latins though, but DCA 1.0 is well into the past.

  12. #102

    • No Disassemble!
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    795

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    In the modern Disney tradition of tie-ins you'd get Jesus wandering around Frontierland if some exec today thought "we need to find some way to connect to the Latino guests.. hey, didn't The Lone Ranger feature some kind of Latino?".

    Name:  a1dd5b3e-259c-496d-9a82-df6428d144ea.jpg
Views: 79
Size:  33.1 KB
    Many Bothans died to bring you these fastpasses.

  13. #103

    • ~
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    558

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nikefutbolero View Post
    Although it wasn't originally part of Mexico, the difference between Mexican culture and American culture is that the native culture (the natives that resided in in N. America) is very prevalent in Mexican culture. Mexicans embrace our native ancestry that runs in our blood, and it's obvious in a lot of our cultural traditions. So when saying it was part of Mexico, it's acknowledging the native presence in the area. Mexico comes from the word "Mexica" which what the people known as the Aztecs, called themselves.

    And there IS a difference between Spanish culture, and Mexican culture. Although the European influence is obvious, the differences are also obvious in the ways I stated above. Spanish culture didn't involve any native traditions, in the way the Mexican culture does.
    Thanks for pointing that out, Nikefutbolero. I'd also like to point out that Latino (not "Latin") culture is different from Mexican culture, encompassing the culture of Latin America as a whole (comprised of many nations, each with its own customs and culture) rather than a singular country.

    Though Wall to Wall Creep does have a point, the Aztec people were never in California. It appears you were claiming that had some form of history in the state, which isn't true--they primarily lived in what is now central Mexico.

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenW View Post
    Yes, popular to the non-natives. This post is arguing for Latin presense to attract Latins. This doesn't really work. It might work to attract the non-Latins though, but DCA 1.0 is well into the past.
    No, that is not what this post is arguing for. Chesire was saying that "Latino culture in California is very prevalent" and "brutally important to its past and present." Chesire never suggested that the purpose of said inclusion was to somehow attract more Latino Guests. The suggestion in the post was to somehow include a culture that has been important in shaping the identity of state of California and continues to be very prevalent today--a culture that everyone can enjoy and one that could lend itself to a beautiful area due to its rich and colorful history, while being an area that seemingly compliments the theme of the park suggested by the re-dedication: "...This unique place embraces the richness and diversity of California... Its land, its people, its stories and, above all, the dreamers it continues to inspire." Latino culture is an important part of the "richness and diversity" of California and is intimately intertwined with much of the state's population, making it a seemingly good thematic fit for DCA.

    However, I think that Melville summed up the basic problem here:

    Quote Originally Posted by Meville View Post
    DCA's theme is tough to nail down at the best of times.
    The main issue is that DCA's theme is quite muddled and doesn't really celebrate the different cultures of the different people of California, or at least, does so very minimally. Knott's is actually more effective at celebrating the cultural diversity of California--Latino culture in the Fiesta Plaza, Native American culture through shows like the Mystery Lodge, and even a few nods to Asian culture (or at least, Asian presence in the state) throughout the Ghost Town, all done with relatively decent respect and regard for the the customs of each culture and the role of its people in the state. DCA, however, has never really celebrated these types of cultures that have defined the state. It has always focused more on the touristy-side of California (e.g. car culture, beach culture, pop culture), which still remains true with this remodel. It has slowly started to incorporate more history and inch away from being a mainly modern portrayal of California, but does still primarily focus on the types of culture I listed above and not really any culture derived from the influences of different ethnicities or nationalities within state.

    Though I would personally love to see more of the latter in DCA, I don't think that it coincides with the direction that the park is moving--particularly when the park is mainly choosing to celebrate aspects of the state which can be connected to a popular franchise (e.g. Cars Land). Perhaps if Pixar's rumored Día de Los Muertos film is successful I could see Disney wanting to include some type of area based on the film, but I don't think it's going to happen on its own. (Read: without the push of a new popular franchise. The case could be made that Disney does have some properties like Zorro or Saludos Amigos/The Three Caballeros, but none that are as well-known and well-selling as other franchises like their Pixar properties).
    Last edited by gatheringrosebuds; 07-08-2013 at 03:14 PM.

  14. #104

    • Selfie Expert
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    7,721

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger55 View Post
    Three Amigos? You mean Chevy Chase, Martin Short and Steve Martin?
    Totally meant Three Caballeros, but I'd also be okay with the Three Amigos!! Hahaha

    Thank you to Poisonedapples for my awesome signature!
    KellyMcG86's Disneyland To Do List

  15. #105

    • Selfie Expert
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    7,721

    Re: Where is all the Latin presence in California Adventure?

    Quote Originally Posted by Disneyland 1951 View Post
    Earlier this year
    Yes! That's who I meant! I'll bet they're amigos, too.

    Love it!

    Thank you to Poisonedapples for my awesome signature!
    KellyMcG86's Disneyland To Do List

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Where's all the merchandise?
    By Sallah in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-02-2007, 09:24 AM
  2. Where does all the water go?
    By Abominable Snowman in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-27-2006, 10:14 PM
  3. Where does all the money go?
    By Alestro Bakai in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-26-2006, 12:26 PM
  4. Where have all the Shakes(and yogurt)gone?
    By kronos in forum Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-13-2006, 09:05 PM
  5. Where did all the smilies go?
    By Mac Daddy in forum The Forums
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-27-2005, 12:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •