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  1. #31

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by KellyMcG86 View Post

    Just for my sake of understanding, with the current system is the procedure that the guest comes up and describes what they need? I.E. - I can't wait in line, I can't climb stairs, etc? Or do they actually describe their condition I.E. - I have epilepsy, I have knee replacements, etc?
    With me, I simply asked if there were any assistance I could get because I was injured and couldn't climb stairs. I said that I was fine with everything else, I just needed to avoid stairs. I didn't go into detail. I always do have my doctors note with me, though, and I always offer it in case they need it. I just want them to know I can confirm my condition if they need me to do so. They never say it's necessary, however.
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  2. #32

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    I figured that's how it went, which makes it pretty clear how easy it would be for someone to just say they need to skip the lines. Obviously, your request (and many others) is perfectly reasonable. They just really have their hands tied with the current process if people demand to skip lines, since they can't confirm any actual need for it, and if they give it to one person they'll have a hard time denying it to another.

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  3. #33

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Do they offer wheelchair access on Davey Crockett Explorer Canoes?

  4. #34

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by UbIwerks View Post
    I can answer the epilepsy question. My 6 year old niece had childhood epilepsy. Her seizures started when she was 3. They weren't brought on by flashing lights, motion or any other ride-related stimulus. They were brought on by fatigue and over-heating. We used a front of the line GAC for her Disney visits. Thankfully - she grew out of her seizures (as most kids do) about a year ago. On our last trip to Disneyland we went GAC free for the first time. We had a valid GAC, but we didnt use it once. We were just so thankful NOT to have to use the GAC.
    I'm kind of in shock. Why would you even risk the possibility of sending your niece into a seizure? SoCal is always warm and for some just going to Disneyland is a fatiguing experience. I would never subject my child to even the remotest possibility of suffering from a seizure that could result in brain damage. It's an amusement park! It's even worse to tell me that if you just waited till she's older there would be no danger. Was it really necessary to take your niece at such a young age?

  5. #35

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by KellyMcG86 View Post
    I have a friend who bragged on Facebook that one benefit to his new diagnosis of epilepsy is that he gets to "skip the line at Disneyland". After putting my frustration aside, I thought, "Why would someone with epilepsy need to skip a line?" I mean, if they're at risk of seizures, it seems many of the rides would put them at risk of a seizure. And does waiting in a line increase the likelihood of a seizure? Moreso than riding the ride itself? You bring up the point that Disney can refuse to allow people who do not meet physical requirements to ride, which I suppose they couldn't stop him unless they knew his exact condition, which then leads to him providing medical information, etc...
    An excellent example, KellyMcG86. What says them potentially having an epileptic episode in a line can't happen while on a ride or the other way around?

    Someone with severe anxiety issues who can "skip the line," so to speak, could just as easily have an anxiety attack hit while riding a ride as they could while standing in line. But of course it's impossible because they skipped the line.
    Someone who has a skin condition preventing them from being exposed to sunlight can't wait in an outdoor queue or in line in general, but they can suddenly ride an outdoor ride with no issues because they could skip the line.
    Someone with chronic body pain can't wait in line but they can ride attractions like Indiana Jones that whip and jerk you around. But of course it's alright because they didn't wait in line.

    This is exactly why the GAC program has been updated. Blatant and inexcusable abuse of the system.
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  6. #36

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by Malcon10t View Post
    But when you load there, you return to the other side with stairs to exit. The way it works now, you take the elevator, and exit to the area without stairs.
    That happened to us this last time because we loaded from one side and ended up on the other. Since my friend needs to directly transfer from ride vehicle to wheelchair, we got to ride again. The people in our row were really grateful because we told the CM's they were with us.


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  7. #37

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kurtoon View Post
    Do they offer wheelchair access on Davey Crockett Explorer Canoes?
    There is an accessible path to the ride, then you must be able to transfer.
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  8. #38

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by hhsdc34 View Post
    I'm kind of in shock. Why would you even risk the possibility of sending your niece into a seizure? SoCal is always warm and for some just going to Disneyland is a fatiguing experience. I would never subject my child to even the remotest possibility of suffering from a seizure that could result in brain damage. It's an amusement park! It's even worse to tell me that if you just waited till she's older there would be no danger. Was it really necessary to take your niece at such a young age?
    With her doctor's permission, while her seizures were in control through medication, while staying at the Grand Californian with many resting trips ... Not that it's any of your business.

  9. #39

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by DrFink View Post
    An excellent example, KellyMcG86. What says them potentially having an epileptic episode in a line can't happen while on a ride or the other way around?

    Someone with severe anxiety issues who can "skip the line," so to speak, could just as easily have an anxiety attack hit while riding a ride as they could while standing in line. But of course it's impossible because they skipped the line.
    Someone who has a skin condition preventing them from being exposed to sunlight can't wait in an outdoor queue or in line in general, but they can suddenly ride an outdoor ride with no issues because they could skip the line.
    Someone with chronic body pain can't wait in line but they can ride attractions like Indiana Jones that whip and jerk you around. But of course it's alright because they didn't wait in line.

    This is exactly why the GAC program has been updated. Blatant and inexcusable abuse of the system.
    Even those examples don't necessarily mean abuse, though. In the case of the skin condition/sunlight, skipping the line might mean that child was outside in the sun for 5 minutes instead of 50, which made it safe for her.

    In the case of anxiety, the person might have anxiety in crowds (and in many queues it's a switchback so it feels very closed in with people) but be OK in his own ride vehicle. A lot of the time panic and anxiety attacks have very specific triggers.

    The mechanisms on some of the rides aren't identical to the pressure on the joints that comes from standing in one place. I can't go on Indy because it gives me headaches. Space Mountain is a different type of motion and it's OK.

    Point being: I'm not making a judgment on whether any of these things deserve green light passes. We all know there's been abuse. You know it, I know it, Disney knows it. But you can never judge someone's situation until you can look at it from their point of view. Something that appears to be unfair or a scam on the surface might not be.
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  10. #40

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    "Obviously, hiring a disabled person to get through lines quicker is a slimy and fraudulent thing to do," writes Los Angeles Times Opinion's Karin Klein. "But this would be an incomplete story without the information that the disabled tour guides also have served as competition for Disney’s own wait-avoidance scheme, its VIP tour guide."

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  11. #41

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

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  12. #42

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Seems the writer of that article has a clue. Rare these days.

  13. #43

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    FWIW, I'd prefer it that way - if Disney's the one booking the tours and scheduling them, Disney knows that on x day they're going to need to have y amount more "back door" admits than they had on another day. It means likely smoother sailing for everyone involved - standby, FP, DAS or VIP.
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  14. #44

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    It seems like one of the complaints about the upcoming changes can be described with this example... numbers for illustrative purposes only

    I can only tolerate 5hrs...
    ... under old model I could do 10 attractions..
    ... under new model I could only do 5 attractions..

    The complaint comes up glossing over 'other' people could only get through maybe 4 attractions in the same period. The focus is on THEIR pace.

    Some believe Disney should enable a disabled person who can only tolerate 5hrs to do 10hrs worth of park visits during the 5hr period. This belief is the source of a lot of the contention.

    That is not something Disney is obligated to do. Disney can and has, but is not obligated to. This change does stand to reduce how many attractions someone can get done in a fixed amount of time. But what it doesn't necessarily do is reduce that person to LESS than what 'open' population have the potential to do. With the crowding/throughput of disabled access at some attractions it would cause greater delays than the 'other' people... but the reduced abuse should help with that problem too, helping reducing those waits.

    I think this concept is the disconnect for many... people thinking Disney should make it so people can concentrate a full trip into a shorter amount of time. That is purely a customer service choice - not legal obligation.

    And in this case, it looks like the lure for abuse was just too high.. so yes those who were in need are brought back down a bit from their previous graces offered by Disney.

    The inability of someone to maximize something's potential is not something ADA or others are required to cover. A younger kid who has more stamina can do more than me.. that's just how it is. The ADA is not required to make you 'normal' stamina or throughput.. it's required to allow your level of stamina to participate.

    This disconnect is why many are upset over this I think.. and why people are confused over what is required, vs what Disney has provided. No matter what, Disney is required to provide accommodations.. but those are not necessarily the ones they offered before.
    Last edited by flynnibus; 09-24-2013 at 08:15 PM.
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  15. #45

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    Re: Is Disney legally required to offer a guest assistance program?

    Quote Originally Posted by DrFink View Post
    People need to start thinking of it this way... Disney could have chosen to discontinue the GAC program entirely because they are not required to offer it. Instead they updated it and are still offering it as a courtesy to their guests. Would you rather have an updated policy or no policy at all?
    I very much disagree with this way of thinking. Disney has purposefully cultivated a loyal customer base among disabled families, and when they change policies that affect those families, those families have every right to offer feedback and voice concerns. Disney then has every right to either listen to those concerns or ignore them. But by no means does anyone "need to start thinking" that they should just shut up and take whatever they're given. Think of what the world would be like if no one ever stood up for themselves!

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