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Thread: Earthquakes

  1. #16

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Anyone remember the problems with the WoC platform that couldn't lower?
    People blamed it on the big earthquake produced by the San Andreas fault jut south of the Us border. I never believed those rumors.

    Ever seen the cracks in Mickey and Friends, again blamed on a quake. But the didn't just show up at the same exact time.

    I wouldn't worry about quakes at DLR except in a few places. The PPH and DLH as they are older/taller building. My biggest concern would be roadways going to and from the resort.
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  2. #17

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Biggest problem will be the mass hysteria.
    Oh, and if MNF collapses, even slightly, that will be very bad, logistically. I'm going to guess that it is a bit more reinforced than the parking structures that collapsed at CSUN.
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  3. #18

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    Re: Earthquakes

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  4. #19

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by mycroft16 View Post
    Nearest fault to Disneyland is the El Modeno fault, a mere 2 miles ENE of the park. The hills just east of the park were uplifted by this fault and the Peralta Hills fault. It doesn't have the large seismic history of the Newport Inglewood fault zone (actually a collection of about 18 smaller fault slip spots) though. Also 2 miles due north of Disneyland is the Puente Hills fault. The San Joaquin Hills fault runs under John Wayne airport just before you get to the Newport/Inglewood fault. So by danger, Newport Inglewood is the winner, but there are several that are much closer and are capable of large quakes. They just haven't put one out in recent times.
    Thanks Mycroft. I knew there were faults that were closer than Newport-Inglewood or Whittier Narrows.

    I live in the San Joaquin Hills which form the coastline between Newport Beach to around Dana Point. Those hills also are the result of uplifting by the San Joaquin hills fault. What is really interesting is that in places where the hills have been eroded due to wind and the force of the ocean, you can actually see the striatum a in the rock twisting and folding over itself like toothpaste coming out of a tube - a testament to millions of years of seismic activity.

    An an interesting side note - the San Joaquin Hills fault is believed to be the epicenter of California's first recorded earthquake, which occurred back in the 1700s. Which is also a bit of worry since that fault has shown to produce large quakes once every 300 years.

  5. #20

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
    I live in the San Joaquin Hills which form the coastline between Newport Beach to around Dana Point. Those hills also are the result of uplifting by the San Joaquin hills fault. What is really interesting is that in places where the hills have been eroded due to wind and the force of the ocean, you can actually see the striatum a in the rock twisting and folding over itself like toothpaste coming out of a tube - a testament to millions of years of seismic activity.

    An an interesting side note - the San Joaquin Hills fault is believed to be the epicenter of California's first recorded earthquake, which occurred back in the 1700s. Which is also a bit of worry since that fault has shown to produce large quakes once every 300 years.
    I love geology. Took a couple classes in college just for the sheer fun of it. I live in Utah, about 1 mile from the Wasatch fault, which uplifted all of our mountains. It's a monster fault capable of 7.5 easily and is LONG overdue. The rock layers in the mountains here are jumbled and folded and twisted in terrifying ways that speak of the raw power stored here. I imagine the peaceful rolling hills of the LA basin to be exactly the same.

    The potential is definitely there. Luckily, building codes and planning help mitigate quite a surprising amount.

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  6. #21

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
    One thing to keep in mind that would effect Disneyland the most is the water table which sits under the city of Anaheim. It really isn't the size of the quake so much as how much soil would mix in with this ground water, causing the ground underneath Disneyland to liquefy, threatening the stability of its older structures. And this is a real threat considering Disneyland's proximity to several large earthquake faults.
    I am not a geologist, but from my understanding, liquifaction actually refers to the phenomenon whereby loose soil (such as sand) behaves as if it were a liquid whenever it is shaken. If I'm right, that would mean no water is necessary for liquifaction to occur.

  7. #22

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by matman730 View Post
    I am not a geologist, but from my understanding, liquifaction actually refers to the phenomenon whereby loose soil (such as sand) behaves as if it were a liquid whenever it is shaken. If I'm right, that would mean no water is necessary for liquifaction to occur.
    ...I'm remembering the story of the first time they filled the Rivers of America with water, it promptly leaked into the loose, sandy soil.

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  8. #23

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Do you suppose it's like a black hole? Disney will eventually suck guests and their money into quicksand? And will it be a man made phenomenon?

  9. #24

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    Re: Earthquakes

    pardon me for any redundancies from other posters - Just shooting right to the questions:

    Quote Originally Posted by Werner View Post
    So the other day as I was daydreaming about Disneyland, the subject of earthquakes came to mind. Not sure why. Anyway, it got me ruminating on a few things:

    1) Has there ever been an earthquake that caused significant damage to Disneyland? (I don't think so, but maybe I just never knew).
    No. Has yet to happen.

    2) How close is Disneyland located to known earthquake faults?
    Everywhere. There are at least 300 known fault lines running under Southern California, alone. All of different lengths. The Inglewood/Newport fault line .... is one of the more significant fault lines running under Orange County. And of course ... the big fault line of them all .. running nearly the entire length of Calfornia - The San Andreas.

    3) Assuming Disneyland is not located especially close to known earthquake faults, was this part of the criteria when Anaheim was chosen (along with climate, freeway access, etc?)
    Back in the early 1950s .. I doubt they were thinking "Earth Quake" zones - like we do today. No different than ads of doctors smoking in hospitals from decades back. The further back we go in time .. the more naive and oblivious we human beings are to health and life risks. Since the only significant quake for those earlier generations of the first half of the 20th Century dealt with one significant quake - The 1933 Long Beach Quake .. and nothing major for DECADES .. I think a sense of false security took place .. especially for scouts .. searching for a theme park in the early 50s.

    4) If a "major" earthquake were to hit Disneyland, what protocols are in place?
    If it's a good sizable one ... why wait around for a CM to later direct you to some "designated holding place"? Don't head out of Main Street! That's what everyone else would do. Those of us who know the park pretty well ... we know where the CM entrance points are into the park ... you make your way, out that way. Ideally .. I would want to be near the exit of Splash Mountain. Right by the shop there .. is a CM access point backstage.

    Also, have any buildings been retrofitted?
    We can almost take a guess at that. These days, imagineers don't work with brand new structures in DL, they tend to recycle old ones - and I wouldn't doubt Pooh, New Fantasyland 1983, Buzz building, Innoventions, Redd Rockets, Star Tours are among older buildings reinforced .. when those buildings were changed over for new attractions. I tend to believe many attractions are "over built" so fortified (I could be wrong) ... more than the average building, outside this theme park.


    5) How safe would you feel during a "major" earthquake if you were in Disneyland (compared to at home or work or on the road or whatever)? Would there be any particular places you would especially not want to be? (I think being in the Indy queue would be particulary scary)
    The difference is crowds. When you have a park with tens of thousands of people inside ... your first instinct should be to head out of CM entrance points. If you shoot down Main Street - you're going to get trampled.


    I am of native of Orange County. Grew up exactly 6 miles from DL. I know exactly what the most significant quakes have been .. for our modern times, near DL. There was the 1971 San Fernando quake. Woke me up, business as usual for most of Orange County. All damage, really, to the north .. North of LA County. Next was the 1987 Whittier quake. Again in the morning ... at work. Right near DL ... a good little shaking. No significant damage to Orange County. Mostly to Whittier in LA county. Next, the 1994 Northridge ... Again ... WAY north .. away from OC. A morning quake again. (All these quakes love early mornings.) The only significant damage .. .was the marque/electronic score board to Angel Stadium fell off to one corner. Later discovered .. shoddy construction to begin with.

    Everything else ... has been with epicenters a distance from Orange County. Luckily .. by the time the "wave" reaches OC .. we get a little rattling. Things fall off shelves. OC has been fortunate. So far. When that luck runs out ... who knows!

    But this is a reality for those who want to live in Southern California. It's a risk for all those who want to live here.

    But I will stress again for the 3rd time ... If a significant one were to happen ... DO NOT HEAD DOWN MAIN STREET TO GET OUT. Especially if it's a really crowded day! You find your way to a CM entry point.
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  10. #25

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Liquifaction is not the same thing as water draining into the water table. The soil behaves as if it's waterlogged, but has nothing to do with the actual behavior of water.

    Crowd control and getting home are probably more important to me than of things at DL itself falling down. I'm not all that worried about things falling down, but then what? I'd still be 100 miles from home, and all the standard post-quake survival things apply. Everybody will need food and water, and to figure out how to get out. I suspect a lot of the backstage gates would be opened up to at least get people out.
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  11. #26

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    Re: Earthquakes

    This is a "not originally from CA" question, I guess - but isn't there any seismic requirement in the building codes these days? All over LA you see all these old buildings with the little metal squares that show they've been retrofitted for earthquakes. Wouldn't all of Disney's older buildings have to be retrofitted - and wouldn't the newer things, like all the buildings in DCA, have to be built to that code?
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  12. #27

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by alphabassetgrrl;1057047156[COLOR=#800080
    Crowd control and getting home are probably more important to me than of things at DL itself falling down. I'm not all that worried about things falling down, but then what? [/COLOR]
    When I think about it, I think that would be my worry with any sort of disaster (natural or otherwise) at Disneyland, or any large crowded place: not the damage caused by the disaster, as much as the disaster caused by all the people who might panic and be too frightened to follow any sort of orderly exit/instructions the staff might have.

  13. #28

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    This is a "not originally from CA" question, I guess - but isn't there any seismic requirement in the building codes these days? All over LA you see all these old buildings with the little metal squares that show they've been retrofitted for earthquakes. Wouldn't all of Disney's older buildings have to be retrofitted - and wouldn't the newer things, like all the buildings in DCA, have to be built to that code?
    One would think. But like everything else where big business, big money and local politicians are involved, the question is highly politicized.

    Some examples of what Southern California's "seismic safety preparedness" is really about...

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  14. #29

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    Re: Earthquakes

    Earthquake faults are everywhere, and if the magnitude is large enough even if it were 100 miles away it could cause damage. I was in the 1989 SF quake. I find it funny that it was called the San Francisco earthquake when the epicenter was over 100 miles south of SF but it was large enough to knock down the bay bridge. I wouldn't worry if it happens it happens. Probably DL is built to strict code so I would think if there were a large quake you would be pretty safe. IMO

    As a side note. The Loma Preita '89 quake was about 4 o'clock in the afternoon not morning
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    Re: Earthquakes

    Quote Originally Posted by alphabassetgrrl View Post
    Liquifaction is not the same thing as water draining into the water table. The soil behaves as if it's waterlogged, but has nothing to do with the actual behavior of water.

    Crowd control and getting home are probably more important to me than of things at DL itself falling down. I'm not all that worried about things falling down, but then what? I'd still be 100 miles from home, and all the standard post-quake survival things apply. Everybody will need food and water, and to figure out how to get out. I suspect a lot of the backstage gates would be opened up to at least get people out.
    What about my black hole theory then?

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