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  1. #31

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda949 View Post
    So if pricing was based on height then why should those parents have to pay more for things their child isn't ready for?
    How is that less fair than parents paying more for the five year old that isn't tall enough?

    Shoot, there are a lot of adults that cannot mentally handle all of the 'E' tickets.

    Personally, I think it's more fair to charge by height in that at least Disney is charging by the ride restrictions Disney itself enforces.

  2. #32

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda949 View Post
    Because you'd be paying more for a child who maybe wasn't quite ready mentally or emotionally for those larger rides. Just because a 3 year old looks like a six year old doesn't mean they can handle Star Tours or California Screamin'. So if pricing was based on height then why should those parents have to pay more for things their child isn't ready for?
    The taller you are, the more rides you can go on. Thus, you take up more space in more lines, and you also help contribute to wear and tear. I don't see any issues at all with going on a height based pricing system.





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  3. #33

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda949 View Post
    Because you'd be paying more for a child who maybe wasn't quite ready mentally or emotionally for those larger rides. Just because a 3 year old looks like a six year old doesn't mean they can handle Star Tours or California Screamin'. So if pricing was based on height then why should those parents have to pay more for things their child isn't ready for?
    There are adults that can't handle Star Tours or California Screamin' but they have to pay full price too. It's no more or less fair than an age based system.

  4. #34

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amanda949 View Post
    Because you'd be paying more for a child who maybe wasn't quite ready mentally or emotionally for those larger rides. Just because a 3 year old looks like a six year old doesn't mean they can handle Star Tours or California Screamin'. So if pricing was based on height then why should those parents have to pay more for things their child isn't ready for?
    Right. My granddaughter was 41" at 2.5 years. We let her ride RSR and Soarin'. But she was not ready for Space or Star Tours or ToT. Just because she was tall enough, doesn't mean she is ready.
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  5. #35

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    So, I looked up the CDC growth chart last year when my little cousins came to visit and I wanted to estimate the probability they'd be able to ride certain rides based on their age. Here it is again.
    Growth Charts - Data Table of Stature-for-age Charts
    At least 50% of females will hit 40'' before 4.125 years old(49.5 months). Less than 5% of females will hit 40'' before 3 years old(36.5 months.) Less than 10% of males will hit 40'' before 3 years old. If I'm looking at these charts correctly, if guests under 40'' get free entry then most American families will end up paying less to get in. Based on this data, it also makes it reasonable to make every guest have a Fastpass at 40" and higher attractions. We write a ton of extra Fastpasses for ticketless guests and based on this CDC data, it seems like a decent chunk of these guests are less than honest about their kids ages. Then again, maybe I'm just seeing the long tails of the dataset more frequently since Racers is so popular.

  6. #36

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    I think that going by age is more egalitarian. Reason being: every single kid has the exact same timespan to get the free admission: 35 months.

    If you do it by height, it's not perhaps fair to the kids who are early bloomers and meet that height by the time they are two years old. And as others have said, even if your two year old is 36 or 40 inches and CAN go on a particular ride, it doesn't mean they SHOULD, or are psychologically ready for it.

    And how would people feel about late bloomers who don't meet the height requirement for a long time and enjoy five or six years of free admission? I was 36" or 38" when I was going into first grade, for instance...
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  7. #37

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    I think that going by age is more egalitarian. Reason being: every single kid has the exact same timespan to get the free admission: 35 months.

    If you do it by height, it's not perhaps fair to the kids who are early bloomers and meet that height by the time they are two years old. And as others have said, even if your two year old is 36 or 40 inches and CAN go on a particular ride, it doesn't mean they SHOULD, or are psychologically ready for it.

    And how would people feel about late bloomers who don't meet the height requirement for a long time and enjoy five or six years of free admission? I was 36" or 38" when I was going into first grade, for instance...
    I'm not sure I'd classify having honest families pay more than dishonest families as "egalitarian" but I can understand your concern. From a marketing/operations standpoint, the 40'' and under free option makes so much sense since the resort has so much excess capacity in terms of attractions, shows, parades, and Meet-and-Greet for the under 40'' crowd. Also, trading two cars of yuppie couples for a family minivan holding 6-8 guests makes more sense in terms of parking capacity utilization. This family of 6-8 is also going to have a collective ride cap 20-50% lower than the yuppie couple since they take longer to eat, use the restroom, shop, and navigate their strollers. The under 40'' for free also helps cement brand loyalty since children under the age of 3 won't remember their visit to Disneyland while a child of 4-6 will retain more happy memories and be far more likely to return with money 2-3 decades later to spend on high margin merchandise, hotel rooms, food, Halloween party tickets, etc. Lastly, Pressler-style management can unfortunately get away with beancounting tactics on the family crowd. For example, replacing the Jungle Cruise and Storybook Land Canal Boats with Small World/Pirates-style boats that have triple the hourly capacities as the current narration boats. Add Frozen, Tangled, Mulan, Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Bald Mountain miniatures to Storybookland-profit! Add a Simba, Tarzan, some cool looking Dinosaurs, and other kid-friendly animatronics to Jungle Cruise plus some low-budget interactive fountains along the flume-profit!

    I think the biggest obstacle to height-check pricing is the cost of extra staffing at Main Gate to take guests aside and rapidly resolve height-check concerns to prevent Main Gate bottleneck. Right now the ratio of honest to dishonest parents probably makes extra Main Gate staffing not financially viable in terms of cost savings.(Main Gate also has higher levels of seniority so their labor costs are higher to begin with.) Still, I can dream of a day where us Attractions CMs get the 2nd or 3rd round of height check tantrums rather than the 1st or 2nd round we currently get.

  8. #38

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    I don't think asking for proof of age is unreasonable, really. They can list it on the site or anywhere tickets are sold. Parents can be prepared. I don't think they'd ask for an actual certificate, a copy or passport should suffice. As far as "carrying ID", well you presumably do that as an adult, anyway, and if you manage to not throw your own ID on the ground I think you can manage to keep track of your kids'.

    I'm saying this as a parent of a 6 month old who plans to attend the park with child in tow. Of course not everyone would agree, but I don't think it's an unreasonable business move.

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  9. #39

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by nerdycm View Post
    I'm not sure I'd classify having honest families pay more than dishonest families as "egalitarian" but I can understand your concern. From a marketing/operations standpoint, the 40'' and under free option makes so much sense since the resort has so much excess capacity in terms of attractions, shows, parades, and Meet-and-Greet for the under 40'' crowd. .
    It's true that there's no way to fake the height requirement (at least to make a kid *shorter*) the way one could fake a child's age - but that could be easily remedied by asking for a birth certificate. And again, I think it's fairer because it gives all kids the exact same timespan for the free admission. If we go by height, your kid might have three years of free admission, or five, or two...

    I'll use myself as an example again: under a 40" rule, I would have been able to go to Disneyland free up until second grade. I would certainly have enjoyed the park, and would have remembered it. Would it have been fair for me to skip merrily into the park for free for nearly seven years, while the poor kid next to me, with tall parents and different genetics, had to start paying at age 2?
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  10. #40

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by KellyMcG86 View Post
    I don't think asking for proof of age is unreasonable, really. They can list it on the site or anywhere tickets are sold. Parents can be prepared. I don't think they'd ask for an actual certificate, a copy or passport should suffice. As far as "carrying ID", well you presumably do that as an adult, anyway, and if you manage to not throw your own ID on the ground I think you can manage to keep track of your kids'.

    I'm saying this as a parent of a 6 month old who plans to attend the park with child in tow. Of course not everyone would agree, but I don't think it's an unreasonable business move.
    I agree. And parents who are traveling might be carrying some form of ID for their baby anyway - a passport and/or visa if the kid is flying or traveling internationally, vaccination certificates, etc. They can just bring it to Disney.

    Disney asks for ID in other circumstances where there are admission concessions; this should be no different.
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  11. #41

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Really good points made on both sides of the height vs. age debate. At first I was really learning toward height, but throwing in the fact that having it based on age really is a point I cannot argue against. If they could just find a way to make it easier to verify age (i.e. birth certificate, which yes could still be faked but much less so than just asking age)

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  12. #42

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    I think that going by age is more egalitarian. Reason being: every single kid has the exact same timespan to get the free admission: 35 months.

    If you do it by height, it's not perhaps fair to the kids who are early bloomers and meet that height by the time they are two years old. And as others have said, even if your two year old is 36 or 40 inches and CAN go on a particular ride, it doesn't mean they SHOULD, or are psychologically ready for it.

    And how would people feel about late bloomers who don't meet the height requirement for a long time and enjoy five or six years of free admission? I was 36" or 38" when I was going into first grade, for instance...
    Considering kids under 6 years don't actually have jobs and don't pay I fail to understand your argument. The kid doesn't feel it is fair or unfair either way because it isn't the kid's money it is mom and dad's

  13. #43

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Malina View Post
    It's true that there's no way to fake the height requirement (at least to make a kid *shorter*) the way one could fake a child's age - but that could be easily remedied by asking for a birth certificate. And again, I think it's fairer because it gives all kids the exact same timespan for the free admission. If we go by height, your kid might have three years of free admission, or five, or two...

    I'll use myself as an example again: under a 40" rule, I would have been able to go to Disneyland free up until second grade. I would certainly have enjoyed the park, and would have remembered it. Would it have been fair for me to skip merrily into the park for free for nearly seven years, while the poor kid next to me, with tall parents and different genetics, had to start paying at age 2?
    40" was just arbitrarily tossed out. It may be that the appropriate cut off might be 32 or 36... But at some point you could define a height that would catch the majority of 3 and over kids. And if parents had an abnormally tall 2 year old they could always leave him at home if they didn't want to pay.

  14. #44

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mackster View Post
    Considering kids under 6 years don't actually have jobs and don't pay I fail to understand your argument. The kid doesn't feel it is fair or unfair either way because it isn't the kid's money it is mom and dad's
    Who said anything about the kids feeling bad? It's about fairness to whomever is paying the admission. I know that if I were a parent, I'd be upset if I had to start paying for my kid at age 2 when another child got free admission for several more years. That isn't fair. Setting the end to free admission at an arbitrary age cutoff IS fair because it applies to every child for the same length of time.
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  15. #45

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    Re: How do they know when your child is too old?

    Under 40" wouldn't need to be free. Charge everyone 1/2 price under 40", infants and all. They can ride the majority of the rides in the park. Everyone over 40", pays the full price.
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