View Poll Results: Accurate Size?

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  • Yes

    8 18.18%
  • No

    36 81.82%
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  1. #16

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve DeGaetano
    I'm not sure any forced perspective is used...Everything on the Texas deck is the same scale as everything on the main deck. Even the pilot house is "full scale."

    Boats...trains..homes and buildings...Everything in the early 19th century was hightly decorated, so the Mark Twain's accoutrements, even for a ferry or packet, are not unusual.

    As for Sambo's post, I noted in my first post here that what he writes comes from the well-researched E Ticket magazine issue on the Mark Twain.
    The railings are where the forced perspective is most evident.

    Each set of railings uses a different style to help disguise the fact that those used at the top are so much shorter than those used at the bottom.

  2. #17

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Perhaps your professor was confusing the Twain with the Columbia, which is indeed a full sized replica of a sailing ship???

  3. #18

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    According to the Walt Disney biography the Mart Twain is a scaled down version of a "common" steamwheeler...though as been stated there were not too often any common steamwheelers...
    However the boat was not made to perfectly scaled down proportions, they found that if the original scale they wanted to use (I don't want to say what it was because I don't remember surely enough) was used 100% things like the boat's railings would be about knee-height. So Disney history says it is scaled, but uniquely scaled.

    ...what kind of class is this where you get to dicuss Disneyland's Mark Twain riverboat??

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  4. #19

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    For the record, the correct phrase is "sternwheeler" not "steamwheeler". There were ships which had the paddle wheel mounted on the side of the ship. Sternwheelers are ships with the paddlewheel on the stern (back) of the ship, like the Mark Twain.

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  5. #20

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by a_hyperbole
    For the record, the correct phrase is "sternwheeler" not "steamwheeler".
    Another one of those type without reading kind of things. Sorry. Thanks for correcting that.

  6. #21

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by PragmaticIdealist
    The railings are where the forced perspective is most evident.

    Each set of railings uses a different style to help disguise the fact that those used at the top are so much shorter than those used at the bottom.
    You know I respect your thoughts very much, Pragmatic, but I'm going to disagree with you here. The railings use different styles because that's the way they really were.

    And frankly, I don't see any differences in height that are dictated by something other than function.

    For those interested in steamboats, you really can't spend $9.00 any better than spending it on this book:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/048...Fencoding=UTF8

    It's filled with wonderful photographs. (Actually, if you look at the railings in the book's cover, you'll see what appears to be "forced perspective" in the railing style--obviously that's not the intent).

    Now, maybe the OP can ask his professor what the arm is called that rotates the wheel on a sternwheeler?

  7. #22

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve DeGaetano
    Now, maybe the OP can ask his professor what the arm is called that rotates the wheel on a sternwheeler?
    Since it goes clockwise on the ROA, I believe "Southpaw" is the word you're looking for.
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  8. #23

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    That is actually the second most-common answer.

    The truth?

    It's a Pitman Arm.

  9. #24

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Wow, Steve, thanks for the book info... I'm definitely going to be ordering that one.

  10. #25

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    As I understand it, true riverboats were constructed long and very shallow in order to navigate rivers. This made them so inherently flexible and fragile, chains were attached from the bow to the stern and supported with posts in-between. These chains actually "held up" the bow and stern of the boat.

    Obviously, the Mark Twain does not use this type of construction. However, as pointed out, riverboats varied a great deal. I think the Mark Twain was strictcly designed to be a very attractive and funtional boat for Disneyland.

  11. #26

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Buck
    chains were attached from the bow to the stern and supported with posts in-between. These chains actually "held up" the bow and stern of the boat.
    Obviously, the Mark Twain does not use this type of construction.
    Actually, this construction technique is used on the Mark Twain. Diagonal "hogging posts" are placed on each side, fore and aft, and high-tension steel cable is used to stiffen the boat.

    The hogging posts can be seen here--one is directly to the right of the left-side smokestack, and the rear post can be seen through the tree branches:


  12. #27

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by speederscout
    Wow, Steve, thanks for the book info... I'm definitely going to be ordering that one.
    Yopu won't be sorry. It's a great book for the price, and the pictures are just awesome!

  13. #28

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    The Mark Twain is on tracks. What I don't understand is how would a real stern wheeler steer? Wheres the rudder?

  14. #29

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    The rudder on a sternwheeler is in the same location as on a regular ship--at the stern, centered.

  15. #30

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    Re: Is the Mark Twain Riverboat a Scale of the Real Thing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve DeGaetano
    Sambo quotes freely from the "E Tticket" magazine, although he fails to credit his source.

    The Mark Twain is undersized for a "riverboat," but does represent a "packet" or ferry boat. That it uses standard nautical "standards" is undisputed.
    You are absolutely correct - I apologize for not crediting "E-Ticket" in my haste...

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