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  1. #1

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    Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Hi everyone. I'm sure almost everyone here is aware of the employment problems Disneyland is having currently, especially the very high turnover rate. One of the ways I think that Disneyland is trying to combat this is through programs geared towards recent high school graduates. They are really ramping up their college programs both at WDW and DL. They have the Disney College program, Disney Professional Internships, Disney Careerstart Programs, Disney Imagi-Nations, and Disney College. Here is a link that can direct you to more information on each program. On the careerstart website, there is actually a lenghty presentation that really tries to advertise WHY a high school graduate should work at Disneyland. Do you people think that it is wise for Disney to focus on this age group? I myself am a high school senior that will hopefully be a castmember within the next year.

    On the Disney career site, they have multiple listings for labor executives... here are some of them...
    Cast Scheduling/Workforce Planning Manager
    posted 7/31/2006 Anaheim, CA JOB DESCRIPTION RESPONSIBILITIES:

    The Cast Scheduling/Workforce Planning department has an opening for a unique combination Labor Analyst/Scheduling Manager/Workforce Planner supporting the Disneyland Resort Travel Sales Center (DRTSC).

    This individual will be responsible for the ongoing design and maintenance of efficient and accurate workloads for all operations locations, including ad hoc labor analysis, workload analytics, and continual partnership with LOB Operations Management to define creative solutions for meeting AOP Operating Labor targets. Support the Operations with demand forecasting, workload analytics, and Variable Workloads, where applicable. Provide labor hour input and perspective in development of the Resort's Labor and Workforce Plans.

    Additionally, provide LOB Operations Management with accurate and timely workforce resource and cross training planning and forecasting (including impacts of terminations, conversions, etc.).

    Finally, promote and ensure effective scheduling and labor management. Balance the needs of the Resort with the needs of the Cast. Monitor and maintain company and department policies as they relate to schedule production and execution. Partner with department management to produce the best schedule possible. Ensure 'Client/Guest' satisfaction with scheduling operations. Lead the Production Schedulers and Resource Desk Assistants. Ensure the teams work efficiently and are focused on client service and consistent application of Resort policies. Serve as a liaison between the DRTSC Cast and the Labor Recording department to research payroll errors and ensure timely correction of pay errors.
    Labor Strategy, Manager
    posted 6/12/2006 Anaheim, CA JOB DESCRIPTION As part of the Worldwide Labor Strategy team within Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, the Associate/Manager will be a core team member working closely with senior business unit management to identify, analyze, develop, recommend and implement key labor strategy initiatives and solutions. This individual will help identify and optimize the segment’s investment in labor and position the segment to capitalize on emerging external market workforce trends domestically and internationally.

    The Manager, Labor Strategy will individually contribute to business plan/pro forma development, coordinate industry/company/market research in support of various labor strategy work-streams, facilitate contact between the Worldwide Labor Strategy Group and external partners, including Human Resources, Finance, WDW Real Estate, Segment Business Development, Corporate Real Estate, local and state government representatives, 3rd party consultants, 3rd party real estate developers and Human Resources (i.e. casting, benefits, recruitment, college program, workforce planning, etc.) This individual will also actively monitor changes in labor market dynamics, understand the evolution of industry trends, and stay abreast of developments in labor management. The Associate/Manager will lead overall research and benchmarking efforts and analysis. A key responsibility will be to help identify and develop alternative labor supply sources both domestically and internationally.
    Manager Labor Relations
    posted 6/8/2006 Anaheim, CA JOB DESCRIPTION Mgr, Labor Relations
    Assist in the negotiation of collective bargaining agreements at the Disneyland Resort. Lead the Labor Relations Team in the administration of those collective bargaining agreements, including grievance processing, arbitration, and the fostering of positive labor-management relations with the unions. Provide advice and counsel to Disneyland Resort management on matters of Company Policy, collective bargaining obligations, and employment law. Facilitate compliance with applicable state and federal law requirements.
    How do you guys feel about the focus on younger workers? How do you think Disney can effectively fix or improve the labor situation at Disneyland resort? From my friends who just started working this summer, they say labor conditions are not very inviting. But also, let's be sure not to pick on the teenagers and say they are the root of all evil, because teenagers can be great castmembers too!! Happy discussing!
    Currently at DreamWorks Animation SKG

    Former Disneyland Adventureland Castmember
    [Skipper & Archaeologist]

  2. #2

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    They will not improve the situation until they pay a competitive wage.

    They will not solve the problem until they reward the behaviors they seek with pay scales above the norm.

    That's the way it works in real life, and just because Disney expects 'magic' doesn't mean they are exempt from those basic facts.

  3. #3

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Here's some info about wages... not entirely checked and verified, but here's some info I'm picking up from the web

    In-n-Out - $9.00
    Starbucks Wage (San Francisco) - $8.83
    Walmarts - $8.25 (back in 94)
    Disneyland Attractions - $8.20
    Big Lots - $7.50
    7-11 - $7.35
    McDonalds - $6.25
    Currently at DreamWorks Animation SKG

    Former Disneyland Adventureland Castmember
    [Skipper & Archaeologist]

  4. #4

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sambo
    They will not improve the situation until they pay a competitive wage.
    That is exactly what they need to do. I work in a very short staffed place right now and our wages are very low and thus we are very short staffed because people simply cannot live off minimum wage. Adults out on their own will not work where I work because they cannot live off the wage and many teenagers still living at home can but once they find a higher paying job, they send in their 2 weeks notice in an instant.

    Disney should be paying atleast 12 dollars an hour to every ride operator and for every 500 hours worked, they should receive a 50 cent increase in salary.

  5. #5

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by dchun2007
    Here's some info about wages... not entirely checked and verified, but here's some info I'm picking up from the web

    In-n-Out - $9.00
    Starbucks Wage (San Francisco) - $8.83
    Walmarts - $8.25 (back in 94)
    Disneyland Attractions - $8.20
    Big Lots - $7.50
    7-11 - $7.35
    McDonalds - $6.25
    If I had to pick Jungle Cruise or Starbucks, I'd pick the JC.
    "As usual he's taken over the coolest spot in the house"- Father re: Orville 1963

    [FONT=Arial Narrow]

  6. #6

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    I skimmed through those job descriptions in the first post - and had an almost uncontrollable urge to go find a Dilbert-inspired "Buzzword Bingo" card and start checking off the terms they were using.

    No analysis required - They have to improve wages AND working conditions. And if they get productivity up at the same time, the wages aren't going to impact the bottom line. The big things I can see are:

    They have to simplify clocking in and clocking out - and make allowances for walk times, Costuming time, and shuttle times. There should be a way to 'pre-clock' at the remote parking lots, so if they arrive with 'sufficient lead time' the workers aren't penalized for shuttle delays, or if they get held up crossing the park by parades or guest questions. They really should be on the clock whenever they're on stage - that was the whole idea behind allowing for 'walk time'.

    They have to improve break rooms and lunch dining options - Break rooms that are clean and have sufficient seating space with working AC, refrigerators toasters and microwaves, and close to the various work locations.

    And you should be able to get in, get lunch and sit down in the full-service eateries without delays - I've heard you spend half your lunch period while they cook everything to order, and then you have to inhale lunch and run. If they're only going to allow a half hour total and there's no practical way to go offsite, they have to have it all ready to rock and roll.

    I hear that it's a lot better at the Team Disney Anaheim (Administration) Building cafeteria, but then again that's reserved for the big bosses and not the front-line CM's.

    They have to improve scheduling so they aren't forcing people to choose between their job and their family or education. Part of that is reducing forced (or coerced) overtime, sixth days, seventh days. Hire enough people so if you need to get off for school, or a vacation day, or pick up the kids from day-care on time, you can.

    And I know of married and room-mate CM's who can't get something simple like on the same shift so they can carpool to and from work. With gas this expensive, having to take two cars on a 50-mile commute because their shift starts are staggered 4 hours apart is just insane.

    The cast members among us can probably come up with a few dozen more things, but these are the 800-pound gorillas in the room. Make the working conditions better and pay competitive wages, and they'll be back to the better old ways - they'll have more applicants than they need, and they can afford to be picky about who they hire.

    --<< Bruce >>--
    There's No Place Like 127.0.0.1

  7. #7

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by dchun2007
    In-n-Out - $9.00
    Starbucks Wage (San Francisco) - $8.83
    Walmarts - $8.25 (back in 94)
    Disneyland Attractions - $8.20
    Big Lots - $7.50
    7-11 - $7.35
    McDonalds - $6.25
    It's a little disappointing that jobs requiring use of the phrase, "You want fries with that?" are often considered bottom of the barrel... yet they apparently pay 80 cents more per hour than operating a $100 million ride attraction at the most successful theme park in the world.

    There an old bromide that says, "You get what you pay for." TDA seems to be doing their darndest to disprove it. They're losing the battle.

    There was a time when Disney employment was often seen as a career. Today, I'm afraid, it's just a place to pass through on the way to a real job.
    "Yesterday, a man walked up to me and said, 'Isn't it a shame that Walt Disney couldn't be here to see this?' and I said, "He did see this, that's why it's here."
    -Art Linkletter July 17, 2005-


    When you wish upon a star your dreams come true.


  8. #8

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    dchun,take a look at all of Al's article's this year, many of them touch on so many of the problems being frustrated even further by Team Disney Anaheim. Quite frankley, the word TEAM is really a misnomer, as they are doing so much to not work as a team with the revolving door of cast members in the parks. Bruce hit upon some of the things that need to be tackled by the new DL president. In addition, DL needs to start recognizing the value of long term employees in the parks. The way DL is acting now, is to get rid of all the older employees, in order to get all cast members under the new contract that was recently negotiated. And the high end of the salary range needs to be increased needs to be increased to encourage cast members to stay aboard.

  9. #9

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    I believe the new contract ups everyones pay by another 30 cents or so after 6 months, which is coming very soon. It goes up again another 30 cents after that. I haven't been able to look at the contract, but I believe I caught that as my manager was showing it to me.

  10. #10

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bergman
    I skimmed through those job descriptions in the first post - and had an almost uncontrollable urge to go find a Dilbert-inspired "Buzzword Bingo" card and start checking off the terms they were using.

    No analysis required - They have to improve wages AND working conditions. And if they get productivity up at the same time, the wages aren't going to impact the bottom line. The big things I can see are:

    They have to simplify clocking in and clocking out - and make allowances for walk times, Costuming time, and shuttle times. There should be a way to 'pre-clock' at the remote parking lots, so if they arrive with 'sufficient lead time' the workers aren't penalized for shuttle delays, or if they get held up crossing the park by parades or guest questions. They really should be on the clock whenever they're on stage - that was the whole idea behind allowing for 'walk time'.

    They have to improve break rooms and lunch dining options - Break rooms that are clean and have sufficient seating space with working AC, refrigerators toasters and microwaves, and close to the various work locations.

    And you should be able to get in, get lunch and sit down in the full-service eateries without delays - I've heard you spend half your lunch period while they cook everything to order, and then you have to inhale lunch and run. If they're only going to allow a half hour total and there's no practical way to go offsite, they have to have it all ready to rock and roll.

    I hear that it's a lot better at the Team Disney Anaheim (Administration) Building cafeteria, but then again that's reserved for the big bosses and not the front-line CM's.

    They have to improve scheduling so they aren't forcing people to choose between their job and their family or education. Part of that is reducing forced (or coerced) overtime, sixth days, seventh days. Hire enough people so if you need to get off for school, or a vacation day, or pick up the kids from day-care on time, you can.

    And I know of married and room-mate CM's who can't get something simple like on the same shift so they can carpool to and from work. With gas this expensive, having to take two cars on a 50-mile commute because their shift starts are staggered 4 hours apart is just insane.

    The cast members among us can probably come up with a few dozen more things, but these are the 800-pound gorillas in the room. Make the working conditions better and pay competitive wages, and they'll be back to the better old ways - they'll have more applicants than they need, and they can afford to be picky about who they hire.

    --<< Bruce >>--
    You made some very good points that would make complete sense, but alas, Disney loves to cut costs on the CMs...which is just ridiculous. My Disney experience STARTS with the CMs. They are the glue that hold the park together.

  11. #11

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    I got paid $8.50/hour at Blockbuster as a CSR.

    I get $6.75/hour (minimum wage) as a waithelp CM at DL or $8.32/hour as a Host/Hostess.
    Member of the Disney Class of 2005
    Disneyland CM for 4 years.
    May 6, 2005 - present.

  12. #12

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Disney has been notorious for low pay from the beginning. The biggest penny pincher as far as salaries went was walt himself. that is what caused the big strike at the studios after the war. He felt that people should be happy to say they worked for him because he only wanted the best, but he paid them the least of all the studios. same with imagineers as well. and when DL was built he hired only the best people but still paid them low pay because they would settle for it.

  13. #13

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Hmmm......wages are just still way out of line.

    No one is expected like 20 dollars an hour or something, but there just needs to be a bump up all over.

    No other way around it. For a standard service job, there's a lot more to be expected than a non-CM in most places, short of the Four Seasons or Ritz-Carlton.

    Yet they really DON'T stress this enough.

    Believe me how I have to tell my CMs all the time when I check them in as a lead that this is NOT Wal-Mart or Target, we work in a *unique* place.

    This is a unique place deserves wages in accordance to the effort the CMs have to put out.

    And not the wages that TDA thinks we should keep on getting.

    Just wish the whole industry understood that too.

    Bye.

  14. #14

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Should we pay the CM's more and reward CM's for good work? Just the other day I was standing in line to get a churro in front of the castle. The CM working behind the cart was really behind and you really can not blame him for that since the churro is a popular food item at DL. I got to the front of the line and he asked me to wait 2 mins until they came out of the oven thingy. So while I was waiting, which I did not mind, a little girl came up to the side of the cart. She asked the CM "Where was IASW?". The CM looked at her and said "Let see I think it is over there" pointing in the direction of Adventure Land. The little looked really lost and so I told her where it is and even showed the little girl and the CM where it was on the map. The CM looked at me and said he really doesnt spend a lot of time in the park. Yes he did thank me for helping him out. Oh and the LEAD was standing right behind the young CM. He just laughed and thought it was funny the CM didnt know where IASW was. These are the some of the people that make it thru Traditions lately. We will see more of this if DISNEY doesnt really take a look at what they got. How could they? They are just trying to fill holes because they become empty very quickly. We all know AL has posted in the past on trials and troubles of the CASTING OFFICE. Some of the Leads and Managers at the DLR are really glad to be where they are today and some of them treat the Lowly CM very badly. They seem to forget where they came from. It is too bad they do not keep in mind what it was like in the trenches. What it was like to work that part time job. I am not singling out all managers and leads. The ones that do feel inferior towards the lowly CM are not helping the situation.

    Most of the CM's do not know how to contact payroll when they think Payroll have left off hours during the pay period. When they do go to the lead or manager and ask all they get is what the rest of get when we go to DMV. Did you fill out this form or send me a email? How dare the CM ask about his/her pay? They can not talk to payroll and the steps to get there are really tricky. I know DISNEY has a lot of people working for them and to handle all this you have to have some kinda of system in place. I work for a large company also and for some reason if I have a a problem with my I can pick up the phone and talk to payroll. The company I work for has about 31,000 workers. I know there are 20,000 or more in the DLR. SO I do think this would be not be a problem. Working for Disney is really a horror movie or like a Disney Film. If you go into the company thinking your working for UNCLE WALT you will be in the horror film and your dreams will shatter. Just knowing a little more about the company and how large companies work you will have a better chance and will enjoy your job more. Most of the young kids do not take this into consideration.

    There are a lot problems at the DLR and I do not think increasing the PAY will fix everything.

    I will tell you this my girl works a lot of split shifts and ends up making up the difference if she works more than 5 days a week. She has not had a day off in about 2 weeks. It only gets better when you get to the 6 day you are working and then they will ask you to ER. Luckly she never got hired in at the regular CM rate. I do not think anyone will solve this problem but DISNEY.
    Jason

  15. #15

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    Re: Solving Disney's Employment Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cousin Orville
    If I had to pick Jungle Cruise or Starbucks, I'd pick the JC.
    Sure, but a JC skipper is an atypical job at DLR. Most CM jobs are far more mundane: custodial, food service, mechandise sales, etc. How many people will commute 10-20 miles (at $3 a gallon) to such a job when the local In-n-out pays better with virtually no commute?

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