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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenEars
    The question is...what will replace those awful looking rocks??? Perhaps the floral planters from the past (like in the picture) or perhaps something new and exciting. How about a big floral garden with some beautiful water fountains in the middle of it. It would look wonderful at night, especially if these water fountains had colored lights added to it.
    Two words: Dancing Waters.

    Bring it back and over to the Park from the Hotel finally, and spruce it up. After seeing the amazing light effects in the "Remember, Dreams Come True" fireworks show, there's no doubt that they could pull off an amazing Dancing Waters continual show at the Tomorrowland entrance.

    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

  2. #32

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    The Orbitron and those severe rocks always intruded into the "equal opportunity" of each land to draw from the Hub. To me, it seemed like Tland was trying too hard and was competing with the subtle mystery of the other lands and how they are artfully set back.

    Now lets get the Orbitron out of there and into it's interesting former self atop the People mover!
    "As usual he's taken over the coolest spot in the house"- Father re: Orville 1963

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  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by zach1
    I've seen other people make this kind of statement, but I'd like to pose a different arguement. When DL opened, the country was in the heat of the Cold War (for that matter, most of DL life was spent in the Cold War). Folks were building bomb shelters in their backyards. The world was going to end in Nuclear Holocaust. That's not so promising. I'm not saying you're wrong sediment, I'm just wondering if TL of the past was so much more hopeful because DL and Walt Disney made it that was for us? Is this too much of a stretch? Or is it possible that DL still has the power to help us see the brighter side of tomorrow if they show it to us?
    The past's tomorrow did have hope (alongside that fear), of going to other worlds and traveling faster in our own world. People saw it in jets and the first rockets. Just think of the proportion of the US that hadn't been more than, say, 1000 miles from where they were born. Now imagine the proportion nowadays that does that distance for vacation once a year! They thought about videophones, about computers and robots that do many different things around the house (though on TV they were mostly evil).
    My "pessimistic" (other poster's word) view of the future is also an optimistic look at today. We have "videophones," both for office use and, more crudely, as a portable device that can take pictures and send them to others. We have crude robots. We have Roomba! We have personal computers that let us communicate with complete strangers!
    I think there is a bright tomorrow awaiting us, since today is pretty nice as it is.

  4. #34

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    NOW I UNDERSTAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!--tomorrowland used to be thought of as a glimpse into the future.

    Maybe in Eisners Vision, it is a Nuclear wasteland of ugliness and boredom! He only missed one detail, he should have added about 500 cars to Autopia so it could be a complete stop and go traffic jam from start to finish! Complete with the Smell of Exaust blowing in your face as yuo go... or dont go...
    -----------------------------------------------
    DISNEYLAND: Greatest Man-Made Place On Earth

    YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK: Greatest *GOD-Made Place On Earth

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by sediment
    My "pessimistic" (other poster's word) view of the future is also an optimistic look at today.
    :confused: I wasn't saying that your view of the future was particularly pessimistic, sed, I was actually basing my comment on yours, that Walt's vision of the future was, essentially, an optimistic look ahead, rather than a doom-and-gloom post-apocalyptic dire-warning cautionary view, which was also relatively common at the height of the Cold War.

    While I realize that to some degree an overly optimistic future vision can be somewhat crippling insofar as it glosses over some very harsh realities that we face both in the present day and in future days, I find myself pretty much incapable of resisting the joy of being swept up by such a romantic vision of progress and advancing technology and solving major world problems and so forth. That cheery view of the future is just so tempting and INVITING that it's hard to not want to just race right to it at full speed. To me, it's exemplified by, primarily, the Monorail Song, as well as "Miracles from Molecules". Sure, they're corny tunes, but the Monorail Song is SO hopeful that it brings tears to my eyes.
    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

  6. #36

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    Maybe it was necessary to have the apocalyptic threat, in order to take people's minds off of it.
    We don't have that (although the threats are still out there).

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by PanTheMan
    NOW I UNDERSTAND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!--tomorrowland used to be thought of as a glimpse into the future.

    Maybe in Eisners Vision, it is a Nuclear wasteland of ugliness and boredom! He only missed one detail, he should have added about 500 cars to Autopia so it could be a complete stop and go traffic jam from start to finish! Complete with the Smell of Exaust blowing in your face as yuo go... or dont go...
    The words "Eisner" and "Vision" are like "military intelligence" or "jumbo shrimp" - words that just don't fit together.

    I've been thinking recently that, popular though it may be with the little ones, the thematic idea of the Autopia is really pretty antiquated by now, insofar as it relates to Tomorrowland as a "glimpse of the future". In 1955, the interstate highway system was brand new and was in the process of being funded and developed, and the idea of vast interstate highways, with the latest Space Age cars whizzing back and forth at high speed nationwide, was very cutting edge at the time, and Disneyland allowed people of all ages to sort of experience a tiny version of this. Today, though, the futuristic sheen on the interstate highway system is long gone, and it's merely a modern reality, one which commonly provokes headaches rather than dreams. While predicting the future has always been a gamble, I'd say it's probably time that the Autopia, which takes up a big chunk of Tomorrowland's real estate, be at long last retired, with some other new, engaging attraction put up in its place (exactly what, I'm not sure, but I'd love to hear suggestions).
    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by SilentBob66
    Two words: Dancing Waters.
    Great idea! One of our favorite Las Vegas treats is the water show at Bellagio. I dunno if Tomorrowland offers enough space to do something like this properly, but I'll bet those Imagineers could figure something out.
    "Yesterday, a man walked up to me and said, 'Isn't it a shame that Walt Disney couldn't be here to see this?' and I said, "He did see this, that's why it's here."
    -Art Linkletter July 17, 2005-


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  9. #39

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    OMG, SilentBob...that picture of the Dancing Waters is awesome!! I totally remember that show, before they changed it to Fantasy Waters and made it all Disney music. I so enjoyed DW much better!! And you're absolutely right, seeing something like that at the enterance to Tomorrowland would be so cool. Perhaps not as big, but definitely as elaborate!




    Quote Originally Posted by SilentBob66
    Two words: Dancing Waters.

    Bring it back and over to the Park from the Hotel finally, and spruce it up. After seeing the amazing light effects in the "Remember, Dreams Come True" fireworks show, there's no doubt that they could pull off an amazing Dancing Waters continual show at the Tomorrowland entrance.


  10. #40

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    A lot has been said regarding the fact that Uncle Walt envisioned the future as a World On The Move (transportation) but that the real future became all about information. If Tomorrowland really needs to be an accurate predictor, then Walt was wrong. BUT... Disneyland is a themed amusement park. Information just isn't that amusing. (Why pay $53 to be able to access Innoventions when you can play video games at home for free?) Transportation... RIDES... are amusing and fun. So what if freeways are commonplace today. Kids (and adults) still have a lot of fun driving the Autopia cars. Walt chose correctly in his vision of the future from the standpoint of what is the most fun. Submarines aren't all that futuristic anymore either but how badly do you want them back?
    "Yesterday, a man walked up to me and said, 'Isn't it a shame that Walt Disney couldn't be here to see this?' and I said, "He did see this, that's why it's here."
    -Art Linkletter July 17, 2005-


    When you wish upon a star your dreams come true.


  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by sediment
    Maybe it was necessary to have the apocalyptic threat, in order to take people's minds off of it.
    We don't have that (although the threats are still out there).
    Sure, I understand what you're saying. Basically that without a competing vision of doom and gloom, a vision of optimism just doesn't have that much to counteract and shine brightly against. And that's certainly possible. But for several years the naysayers have had the upper hand in our culture and society, and I think it's high time to take it back, look up and forward, and bring back the visions of awesome yet practical dreams of the future.

    I've always thought Tomorrowland should be a sort of test-bed for some of the newer ideas of technology and American industry. Innoventions, idea-wise, is supposed to focus on this, but the execution of it is just laugably pathetic and more about corporate product placement than anything else. Why is it that the American public didn't see the Tempur-Pedic bed in Tomorrowland first, or the DVD, or VoIP, or nanotechnology, or hybrid cars, or biotechnology, or many of the other wonderful technological developments that we've seen in the last quarter century or so? It should be so! Tomorrowland should even feature presentations, forums, and workshops by various futurists, to further develop ideas and concepts of what our future world will be like. Tomorrowland is the one and only land in Disneyland that potentially has an actual AGENDA and could be a showcase of ideas and creative minds actively working toward a better future for the entire planet. Instead it's treated like "Sci-Fi Land" and written off as some cartoonish play area for kiddies. It has so much more to offer us not only as regular Park visitors but to society as a whole.
    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

  12. #42

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    There's a miniature version of the Bellagio fountains at The Grove in L.A., and it's very effective while taking up a relatively small space.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex3231
    why'd they add the rocks in the first place?
    Hahaha, believe it or not, the rocks are remnants of a discarded concept for Disneyland Paris that never made it off the drawing board. The similar rocks at DLP's Discoveryland entrance don't even make sense, so how in the world they were supposed to represent anything at California's Tomorrowland is completely beyond me.

    But, back in the day of grand plans, DLP's Discovery Mountain was to be a huge volcanic peak. Eruptions were purported to have resulted in hardened lava formations all over Discoveryland. Plans were scaled back, scaled back again, and Discovery Mountain eventually became DLP's Space Mountain. The lava "missiles" never made sense in Paris, and they've been an unmitigated disaster for our Tomorrowland. I can't wait till they're gone!!

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Chaney
    A lot has been said regarding the fact that Uncle Walt envisioned the future as a World On The Move (transportation) but that the real future became all about information. If Tomorrowland really needs to be an accurate predictor, then Walt was wrong. BUT... Disneyland is a themed amusement park. Information just isn't that amusing. (Why pay $53 to be able to access Innoventions when you can play video games at home for free?) Transportation... RIDES... are amusing and fun. So what if freeways are commonplace today. Kids (and adults) still have a lot of fun driving the Autopia cars. Walt chose correctly in his vision of the future from the standpoint of what is the most fun. Submarines aren't all that futuristic anymore either but how badly do you want them back?
    Sure, and I agree, rides are more fun than dry information. But even if we were to take the Autopia as, thematically, one variation of the concept of "Transportation of the Future", then a major refurb is definitely in order (personally I like the idea of landspeeders, but I'm not sure that's technologically feasible juuuust yet). I refer back to my posts with the photos from Minority Report, which could conceivably combine both the Autopia and the PeopleMover concepts in one. http://www.micechat.com/showpost.php...8&postcount=44 I'm just advocating that the suits let the WDI guys just go nuts creatively and let loose, because I'm pretty sure that if they do that, it'll turn Tomorrowland into one of the most awesome spots on the planet (and make those cash registers cha-ching more dinero to el bottom line).
    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by innerSpaceman
    Hahaha, believe it or not, the rocks are remnants of a discarded concept for Disneyland Paris that never made it off the drawing board.
    That is just sad. OTOH, Pressler/Harriss are gone. Only natural to rip out the rocks, too.
    While we're at it, Pooh has nothing to do with critters...
    I think the best place for Pooh ride is Main Street USA, where all your stuffed toys come to life!!

  15. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by innerSpaceman
    There's a miniature version of the Bellagio fountains at The Grove in L.A., and it's very effective while taking up a relatively small space.
    You mean this?
    My fondest memory of Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened....I was standing next to him - I was 12 years old - he was looking at the gate where people were coming through, he had his hands behind his back, he had a grin from ear to ear, but you could see the lump in his throat and the tear coming down his cheek because his dream had been realized. -- Mouseketeer Sharon Baird, "Mouseke-Memories", Walt Disney Treasures: The Mickey Mouse Club

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