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  1. #31

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Paul Pressler was Satan's little helper with Cynthia Harriss as his little minion (Eisner was Satan himself).

    Jay Rasulo is the new Satan of the Disney Company.

  2. #32

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    I have a thread here that has a lot of the history of DCA...

    http://www.micechat.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9078

    Lets look at a couple of Paul Pressler highlights from the thread....

    First, from an Orange County Register article from October, 2002



    Try to turn California Adventure into something more than an oft-vacant sideshow for Disneyland.....

    Look at California Adventure, the signature of Pressler's reign as theme-park king. The ailing park surely suffers from a lack of amusements - an obvious result of its relatively low-budget construction, if you can say that about a $1.4 billion park.

    Pressler's bet that a quirky mix of rides, eateries and retailing would make the new park a draw was a flop.

    For Disney, California Adventure is not the sole Disney ailment.

    Keonig(sic) said Pressler does deserve a good share of the blame for the alleged lack of creative ambition at the Disney theme parks. He said California Adventure, in which Pressler played a central role, suffers from a much deeper problem than temporary economic woes. It's a conceptual problem, he said: The mostly local people who attend Disneyland simply don't want to attend a theme park about California.
    And from a November 2002 Marketwatch.com article (selected paragraphs only)



    Walt Disney Co. is betting small insects and a big building will help its troubled California Adventure theme park find a following nearly two years after it opened at a cost of $650 million.

    California Adventure, the adjacent Grand Californian hotel and the Downtown Disney shopping district cost a total $1.4 billion. The park itself cost an estimated $650 million. By contrast, the new DisneySea park in Tokyo -- paid for by licensees -- went for roughly $3 billion.

    To get California Adventure numbers up, Disney will have to acknowledge the theme needs to be reworked. Much of its business is local, and there are few park visitors who want an education on their own state, analysts say.

    "In order to turn this around, they have to turn their back on the concept," said Jim Hill, a longtime Disney observer who operates a Web site devoted to company news. He says there are a number of proposals under consideration to add new attractions at the park, all of which will result in the California theme getting shunted aside.

    "Everything that's on the table is stuff that's fun to ride. It has nothing to do with the California theme," Hill said.

    To be sure, California Adventure has gone through the growing pains associated with many of Disney's parks. But some observers say it's worse this time.

    One of them is John Cora, Disney's former vice president in charge of resort development, who was responsible for putting in many of the attractions at the new park. He left the company shortly after it opened in February 2001, and now is a theme park consultant based in Oceanside, Calif. Cora says he had an amicable parting with Disney.

    Cora says Disney's highest priority in developing the park was to keep costs down.

    "That was the bottom line," he said, adding he differed with management over how much and where to spend money on the park.

    California Adventure, the adjacent Grand Californian hotel and the Downtown Disney shopping district cost a total $1.4 billion. The park itself cost an estimated $650 million. By contrast, the new DisneySea park in Tokyo -- paid for by licensees -- went for roughly $3 billion.

    Cora says that the underlying problem is that to round out the park, California Adventure had to put in an inordinately large number of high-end restaurants, stores, and other retail outlets. Patrons balked at the prospect of spending $45 to get in, and then spend more on goods and food.

    That was the influence of former Disney parks chief Paul Pressler coming through, Cora says. Pressler had extensive training in the retail sector and left Disney to become chief executive of Gap Inc. in September.

    "Part of the problem is Paul came from retail. He thought retail and still thinks retail," Cora said. "We spent enough money overbuilding retail and food (operations) to add three or four more major attractions to the park."

    Some of those facilities are closed or have been replaced. Along with the Soap Opera Bistro and Mondavi winery, Wolfgang Puck operated a restaurant in the heart of the park for a time but eventually left. Disney is operating another restaurant there now.
    And from Al Lutz in 2001


    On Monday, January 15th I finally got to visit Paul Pressler's, Michael Eisner's and Barry Braverman's baby, the awkwardly titled Disney's California Adventure park (or as everyone is now and will be calling it for short, DCA). Born out of a secluded and expensive executive retreat, this is the Walt Disney Company's attempt to turn the original Disneyland park into the "Disneyland Resort" - via an expanded hotel presence, and a new upscale mall connecting the entire package together - all in the hopes that visitors will extend their stays (and spending) on Disney owned and controlled property.

    As with any major project, this expansion reflects the vision of the people in charge. In particular this project rather vividly demonstrates the lessons company president Michael Eisner learned via the financial headaches of Disneyland Paris, and it sufferes from the severely restricted creative management and vision of resorts and Imagineering head Paul Pressler, who focused primarily on the revenue generation portion of the park to the clearly apparent exclusion of the entertainment and ride aspects.
    And from Jim Hill in 2001


    The project quickly went into overdrive from there. Since Pressler and Braverman were the first to suggest a California-based theme park, Eisner put them in charge of developing it. This, as events continue to unfold, might have proven to have been a mistake.

    raverman, who was just coming off his first big success with WDW's "Innoventions" project, was anxious to see his star continue to rise within the Walt Disney Company. Eisner wanted a cheap park? Fine. Braverman planned to budget Disneyland's proposed second gate so tightly that the blueprints would squeak.

    But Pressler was also an ambitious man. He too was already plotting his next move up the Disney corporate ladder, perhaps parlaying his Disneyland presidency into something further up the food chain. But, to do that, he'd really have to deliver the goods on the Disneyland second gate project.

    So Pressler took Braverman's initial budget estimates ... and slashed them by a third.

    Okay, so now we've got two ambitious people, each out to impress upper management by delivering a low-budgeted project on a high-speed timetable. Can you say "recipe for disaster"? Sure you can.

    Pressler and Braverman got the project off on the wrong foot when they announced that they didn't want "Disney's California Adventure" designed by WDI. Instead, they wanted Disneyland's second gate to be created by the same folks who designed WDW's hotels: the Disney Development Company (DDC).
    And finally, an old SaveDisney.com article...




    In 1999, Paul Pressler became the President of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, and shortly afterwards would be named Chairman. He was given a more powerful role than any other Parks & Resorts chief in history. He wasn't only supervising Park Operations, he was put in charge of Imagineering as well.

    Paul Pressler was already well known to WDI by 1999. As President of Disneyland, he had been intimately involved with the design and development of Disney's California Adventure. Pressler helped shape the concept and determined the budget for the park. It was reported that the overall expansion of the Disneyland Resort was well over one billion dollars. Most of that money did not go into California Adventure; in fact, the park received less then half of the investment. Most of the money went into the new parking structure, Downtown Disney, and especially the Grand Californian Hotel. The park designers would have to work with crumbs. But Paul Pressler wasn't just the guy holding the purse strings anymore, as Chairman of Parks & Resorts he had creative approval as well. For the first time in Disney history, a moneyman was dictating "creative" changes to the artists at Walt Disney Imagineering.

    Paul Pressler had convinced everyone on the Parks & Resorts team that Disney's California Adventure would be an unparalleled success. In the days leading up to the opening of California Adventure, the Director of Attractions at Disneyland, Paul Yeargin, openly discussed his concerns that Disney's California Adventure would fill to capacity every day. He thought the resort's biggest problem would be disappointed guests, who, after traveling a great distance to see California Adventure would have to settle for Disneyland instead. Yeargin and other Disneyland executives made decisions based on this premise. Including a now infamous decision by Disneyland Resort President, Cynthia Harriss, to restrict Annual Passholders from using their passes at Disney's California Adventure for the first few months after opening. This decision only served to anger the already disgruntled 400,000 passholders who provide a significant amount of revenue for the resort. Harriss and Yeargin, like many of the Disneyland executives, had followed Pressler over from the Disney Stores and had no previous theme park experience.

    Then in February 2001, the world saw what had been festering behind closed doors at WDI for the past several years. Disney's California Adventure opening in the old Disneyland parking lot. It was a mix of off-the-shelf carnival rides and film-based attractions. When Walt's close friend and long-time Imagineer, John Hench, saw the park for the first time he said, "I liked it better as a parking lot." WDI would try to fix California Adventure any way they could. They threw attractions at it left and right...Who Wants to be A Millionaire, a bug's land, The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, even the Main Street Electrical Parade would come out of moth balls. None of it worked, of course.

    All these projects were subject to the same approval process as Disney's California Adventure. Park Operations (Paul Pressler) would need to approve the concept and budget for the new attraction. The Strategic Planning department would then determine if the project were economically feasible. Then if the project were approved, it would be supervised by Project Management to make sure the creatives didn't try to improve the attraction after it was in production. Of course, all these new systems of control came with a price tag, which drove up the cost of the projects.

    The Walt Disney Company was spending more money on bureaucracy and less on the attraction itself. In the end, the paying guest got shortchanged.

    At WDI, it was taboo to suggest that there was something wrong with California Adventure or the any of the new attractions. At first, WDI management said that the weather was to blame. When the weather cleared up, they blamed the economy. Then they used the new standby...people were scared to travel after September 11th. None of these excuses were valid because Disneyland continued to have much more respectable attendance figures (it's hard to image the weather or economic conditions could be so drastically different ninety feet to the south).

    It would seem that WDI could sink no further, but in March of 2002, Pressler (along with former strategic planner Jay Rasulo) opened the only Disney theme park less impressive then California Adventure...Walt Disney Studios Paris. The park failed so miserably, it forced Disneyland Paris into a debt re-structuring plan that currently threatens the future existence of the resort. The pendulum had swung to the other extreme.

    Walt Disney Studios Paris is the total opposite of Disneyland Paris. It is a theme park by the numbers-designed with a spreadsheet instead of paint and brush.
    Check out my Theme Park Photos at http://darkbeer.smugmug.com

  3. #33

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Anyone remember that scene in the Movie Airplane where the passengers line up to slap/hit the hysterical woman? I'd like to start a line like that for Paul Pressler. Oh and Eisner too.

  4. #34

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Paul Pressler was a personal friend of Eisner. He ran the Disney Stores during their heyday and people gave him a lot of credit for making the Disney Stores the success they became. But, he didn't. All that stuff was planned out and budgeted for long before he became the leader of the stores. Pressler was chosen for the role of President of Disneyland solely on his friendship with Eisner. His background was in retail, he had never set foot in Disneyland even though he had lived in Southern California all his life until he became the President.

    He was there for one purpose, to make the bottom line better. He did this by closing rides and some small stores. He made the people in charge of maintenance cut back on all repairs. He closed the Subs for two reasons. He didn't want to pay for the repairs necessary in the Show Building and he didn't want to pay for a ride operator to stand in the sub to make it go forward and stop. He told the maintenance people on Big Thunder to run the ride into the ground and then close it. He was the one who told them to repair the stress fractures in Space Mountain with tape and glue, not full blown repairs. It was closed suddenly when OSHA pulled a morning inspection and proclaimed the ride now too dangerous to run. He would not authorize any repairs for that ride, Subs, Rocket Rod, or Big Thunder. He had to keep the Pirates and Mansion ride open even though he would not authorize any major repairs.

    His "Expertise" was in Merchandising. Although, after what he has done at the Gap makes that expertise somewhat suspect. There were a lot of plans and budgets already in place when he took over operations of the Gap. Sound familiar? Then, when those plans ran out, he had nothing. If you look at the performance of both the Disney Store and The Gap when he became President you can see that right after he came on board, the place went to the top of sales charts and performance. Within a year you notice the sales and performance charts start to drop and drop and drop. He did the same thing at Disneyland, only on a much larger scale.

    He did not like Fireworks and could not understand people's fascination with them. He also did not understand why people held Walt Disney in such high regard. He thought that Disneyland was a place that people came to for food and plush. He actually said one time in an interview, that people did not come to Disneyland to ride a bunch of rides. They came to spend money on food and plush. He just didn't get it! He knew absolutely knew nothing about running a Theme Park, period. After this sterling performance Eisner promoted him to President of all Theme Parks Worldwide, The Disney Cruise Lines and Imagineering. He didn't get anything about any of these new additions. Imagineering became the place where people sat around and dreamed all day according to him. He didn't understand why they were there. So he didn't give them much of a budget and a lot of very talented people left. He didn't get the Cruise Line but Matt did and he was running the Cruise Line. Pressler didn't pay much attention to the Cruise Line for one very important reason. It was the highest scoring division on any chart.

    He saw the writing on the wall after complaints about the Park, mainly from our own Al Lutz made the front page of the LA Times and other big national papers and evening newscasts. Eisner saw these and was not happy. He told Pressler to turn the Parks around or else. Well, Pressler didn't have a clue how to do this, so he left and his assistant Cynthia Harris was named President. Now, Cynthia was almost a carbon copy of Pressler as far as knowledge of Theme Parks, but she was much more of a people person that he ever was. Then the death on Big Thunder occoured. If you saw her at the newscast that afternoon from the Park, you could see it in her face. She realized that in retail (her background) people don't get killed while shopping. This happened on her watch. Her eyes were red and swollen and she seemed to be in shock through most of that newscast. They also reported that Eisner, who spoke during most of the Newscast, had "rushed" down from Burbank when the news broke. Bull! He was right there at the Grand Californian for a meeting. He had spent the night. He was "rushed" over from the Hotel, not Burbank. Cynthia left shortly after this, and joined her former boss, Pressler, at The Gap.

    Matt came on board the next day. He came from The Disney Cruise Line for which he was a leader with the highest rating for Guest Satisfaction and Guest Return of any division. He knew Theme Parks and he brought with him two of his Cruise Line assistants who not only knew Theme Parks, they had grown up in them. He took care of Disneyland like no one has in the last 10 years.

    Then of course, Eisner left. And Bob Iger became the new Disney Company leader.

    That was the start of a very short lived Golden Age for Disneyland. Matt left quite suddenly after getting the run-around one time too many from Jay Rasulo, who is now in charge of Theme Parks Worldwide, Imagineering, Cruise Lines and has set his own personal agenda for fame and fortune. His rather caustic way of doing things has not improved since Matt left and there is now some rumor that John Lassiter is fed up with Jay and wants him out. He had the same feelings with Marty Sklar who was quickly removed as the head of Imagineering and given an honorary title so he can't do any more damage.

    It now remains to be seen what Ed Grier will do to hold on to his position. So far a lot of people are not impressed. What the future holds not only for our beloved Park, remains to yet be written in the Book Of Fate. We just have to wait and see, and keep our fingers crossed.
    Peter Pan Forever!!! I Will Never Grow Up.

    Thank You Poisonedapples

  5. #35

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    In short, Paul Pressler almost destroyed Disneyland, but of course, Eisner, being the top top man in charge, cannot lay blameless either.

  6. #36

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    You're fairly likely to see a lot of negative things posted about Pressler, but as with all things, the truth is somewhere in the middle.

    As a manager and executive at Disneyland, Paul was extremely successful. Before he showed up at Disneyland, the business model was along the lines of "high expenditure, high return." Guests were paying a premium price for a premium product.

    After Paul showed up the business model changed. I think it's impossible for anyone here to guess if the business model changed due to Paul's actions, or rather from the normal evolution of Disneyland. At the time that Jack Lindquist was replaced, the common theory within the halls of Disneydom was that revenue increases at Disneyland could no longer be guaranteed by attraction development, in part because the park had reached it's maximum capacity.

    Despite the huge amount of money being poured into attractions at Disneyland, attendance topped out at about the same number year after year. In an interview a few years back, Paul actually referred to Disneyland Park as an eroding asset - that growth in Anaheim would not be sustained by Disneyland alone.

    Paul implemented several programs at Disneyland to increase attendance/revenue growth without spending millions and millions on new attractions. They revamped food locations by offering the scramble serve system, which increased efficiency for more guests per hour - and also brought in some new improved dishes to increase the quality of the food offered. They revamped the merchandise department to offer more of the products that guests wanted, and eventually offered high priced merchandising events to purchase high quality limited edition merchandise. They spent millions on new entertainment offerings, and offered discount annual passes to get people coming through the gates in record numbers.

    All of those programs, on paper, worked perfectly. Attendance increased to record levels, and revenue increased. Coupled with the decreases in spending, Paul's programs at Disneyland seemed very successful. So successful in fact that Paul was promoted to a higher position overseeing all of the theme park operations in Anaheim and Florida.

    There are a lot of people who complain about the direction Disneyland took under Paul. Some of it is valid, but a lot of it is not. I do fault them for overselling the park, and making admission cheap for millions of people. I think it has had a negative impact on everything from maintenance to employee morale. More guests and more passholders = longer park hours, more labor hours and more maintenance hours. I think current management is trying to fix this now by increasing the value of the park, and increasing admission.

    There will be a lot of people who blame Paul for closing their favorite attractions, or removing their favorite show, but the truth is that Disneyland is an ever evolving business, and times change. Whether Paul was president or not, most of those shows and attractions would have been closed anyway. Mostly I don't find these complaints valid at all, especially considering that attendance remained high, and those who do the most complaining about such things, seem to go every week regardless.

    So there's lots of pros, and lots of cons. You have to give credit to the man for trying something new, and even now 10 years later, people still discuss his actions. Long after Ouimet and Lindquist have left the earth, they will still be talking about Pressler.

  7. #37

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrLiver View Post
    and even now 10 years later, people still discuss his actions. Long after Ouimet and Lindquist have left the earth, they will still be talking about Pressler.
    Yes, there's a word for that. It's called INFAMY.

  8. #38

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    To augment what LostBoy posted, a favorite Pressler story is one that LB's told me a couple of times...at a press conference at the park to (I believe) announce his new position of Disneyland President...Pressler had the chutzpah to tell reporters that that was the very first time he had ever visited the park. As you would guess, those in attendance were stunned, as they well should have been.

    Bad enough that it was true. Worse to admit it to the media, thinking it's some kind of charismatic ploy or whatever.

    The best thing Pressler ever did while at Disney was to introduce the Angels red uniforms, and put the team up for sale the very same year they won the World Series, despite Disney's bungling ownership.

    Rumor had it that the Opera House might soon be housing "Great Moments With Mr. Pressler".

    But they're still looking for one.

    --Barry

    PS...While the Angels red uniforms are great, and certainly an improvement of that periwinkle blue mess that Eisner dreamed up, can't help but think...there's Pressler again...retail clothing sales as fans bought up the new gear...
    God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

  9. #39

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Pressler was still in charge of DL, even when Harriss came on Board
    as DL VP and then DL President.

    add to the rest of his list of DL sins

    Pressler also got rid of the Main Street Electrical Parade.
    He also gave his thoughts and input when DCA was being built.

    Should mention, The Country Bears, did have the Christmas Show
    over lay, which went away when they moved in the Pooh in. Not
    even Jay Rasulo was happy with how this turned out, and the
    Promotions and Kick off for the New Pooh ride were Cancelled.

    His most acclaimed quotes: "Build on the Cheap" and "Run to Failure"

    Budget cut so drastically for TL '98, that ALL of the
    attractions added during this time are either closed,
    or not popular to maintain them being open. The
    water play area became a baby bidet. Nasa Space
    Exhibit is gone, Annoying "new" Mr. Tommorrow still
    harassess everyone entering Innoventions, which is
    no more than a Circuit City type display, Honey I Shrunk
    the Audiences film is needs refurbishment, Star Tours
    drastically needs an Update, Buzz Lightyear Lunching Pad
    has thankfully return to the "Old" improved Tomorrowland
    Terrace. Rocket Rod Burned out before they could even
    get it working. In all, it brought TL to its' absolute
    worst point in it's 50 year history.

    The Whole MSEP/Light Magic Story is Another Black Spot
    on Presslers record.

  10. #40

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Budget cut so drastically for TL '98, that ALL of the
    attractions added during this time are either closed,
    or not popular to maintain them being open.
    It is revoltingly astonishing what they have done to Tomorrowland. All that ugly fading gold paint on everything, including all the conduit railings they built on the Peoplemover tracks, the fading green Rocket Rod queue.....it's deplorable.

    Pressler and Pressleronian types should be ashamed of themselves. On Sunday, I asked a Monorail CM why they painted the Rocket Rods track. She didn't even know what Rocket Rods was, nor had she ever heard of the Peoplemover! Can you believe that!

  11. #41

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Quote Originally Posted by MagicKingdomBoy View Post
    She didn't even know what Rocket Rods was, nor had she ever heard of the Peoplemover! Can you believe that!
    Ummm yes. Those things happened 7+++ years ago. Pretty silly to expect a cast member to know something that trivial in my opinion.
    Last edited by Mathius; 03-13-2007 at 05:03 PM.

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathius View Post
    Ummm yes. Those things happened 7+++ years ago. Pretty silly to expect a cast member to know something that trivial in my opinion.
    So, what should they know? And do remember, this is Disneyland. People sometimes expect something a little more special than SFMM or Knott's. Just because Pressler had to bring in consultants with a PowerPoint presentation to convince everyone that being good enough for Six Flags was good enough for Disneyland doesn't mean that every guest feels that way.

  13. #43

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aladdin View Post

    The Whole MSEP/Light Magic Story is Another Black Spot
    on Presslers record.
    Ohh I forgot about that.



    Walt's love of Trains!

  14. #44

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathius View Post
    Ummm yes. Those things happened 7+++ years ago. Pretty silly to expect a cast member to know something that trivial in my opinion.
    Ummmm I think every CM should get a Disneyland history lesson as part of their training.

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    Re: What Did Paul Pressler Do To Disneyland?

    I'm sure someone has mentioned these, but:
    1. Closing attractions without a viable replacement plan, on the philosophy that attractions do not directly generate seeable revenue on the spreadsheet.
    2. Closing two attractions (CircleVision, PM) to make one (RR), and putting the TL weenie down on the ground, creating a giant clogging space to rival Adventureland.
    3. Believing that Revenue is a constant factor of the Attendance Count, he drove attendance up using a ticket media scheme that has created a year-round dichotomous consumer base (where there once was a season-dependent dichotomous consumer base), neither of which can survive while the other lives. (Well, not year-round, at least.)
    4. Getting guests out of lines and supposedly into the shops and restaurants with an idea ill-suited to DL's size (probably better for WDW) and demographics (one part of the aforementioned dichotomous base has tremendous advantages due to frequency of visits, which can cause shrinkage of the other, more revenue-enhancing base's repeat visitation).

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