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  1. #31

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    Re: In One Word, What Does the Name "Disney" Mean?

    Incidentally, Eisner described the brand using three words: "creativity", "quality", and "synergy".

  2. #32

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    Re: In One Word, What Does the Name "Disney" Mean?

    Walt Disney = Genius

    Disney (Presently) = Backfiring

    Disney (Seems like it will be) = Improving (I hope.)


    myspace.com/xrybox


    Next trip to Disneyland - August 17, 2007

  3. #33

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    Re: In One Word, What Does the Name "Disney" Mean?

    To me, the word that encapsulates all that Disney is and will ever be is: "imagination".

    If one of the company's endeavors is not extraordinarily imaginative, then said endeavor does not deserve to bear the Disney name.

    All the other ideas associated with the trademark are incidental. So, think of how many products onto which the company slaps the Disney name that do not show this extraordinary imagination. By doing so, the company dilutes the meaning of the trademark and confuses the public about what they can expect from a Disney product.

    To illustrate, take Disneyland and Walt Disney Pictures, for example. Before "Pirates of the Caribbean", many of the same people who would visit Disneyland without giving it a second thought wouldn't be caught dead going to a Disney live-action film. Why was that situation the case?

    "Dead Man's Chest" really was incredibly important in redefining the post-Walt Walt Disney Pictures so that it would be aligned with Disneyland, which better embodies the meaning of the Disney trademark.

    Thankfully, Dick Cook and Robert Iger must have recognized the same schizophrenia since Disneyland is now helping to define the Disney trademark as it is expressed at the studios through films like "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "Prince of Persia".

  4. #34

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    Re: In One Word, What Does the Name "Disney" Mean?

    nostalgia



  5. #35

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    Re: In One Word, What Does the Name "Disney" Mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
    To me, the word that encapsulates all that Disney is and will ever be is: "imagination".

    If one of the company's endeavors is not extraordinarily imaginative, then said endeavor does not deserve to bear the Disney name.

    All the other ideas associated with the trademark are incidental. So, think of how many products onto which the company slaps the Disney name that do not show this extraordinary imagination. By doing so, the company dilutes the meaning of the trademark and confuses the public about what they can expect from a Disney product.

    To illustrate, take Disneyland and Walt Disney Pictures, for example. Before "Pirates of the Caribbean", many of the same people who would visit Disneyland without giving it a second thought wouldn't be caught dead going to a Disney live-action film. Why was that situation the case?

    "Dead Man's Chest" really was incredibly important in redefining the post-Walt Walt Disney Pictures so that it would be aligned with Disneyland, which better embodies the meaning of the Disney trademark.

    Thankfully, Dick Cook and Robert Iger must have recognized the same schizophrenia since Disneyland is now helping to define the Disney trademark as it is expressed at the studios through films like "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "Prince of Persia".

    Imagination is ultimately the key to what the name Disney should be all about.

    "Disneyland will never be complete, as long as there is imagination left in the world"- Walt Disney

    Kids will like the POTC films, but like all great Disney films throughout the years from Bambi to Beauty and the Beast to Toy Story, they are made for imaginative adults, and kids like them too. In other words, they are not kids movies, they are movies aimed at anyone with an imagination.

    Disney still needs to work to erase the tween label given to it by things such as High School Musical and Lizzie Macguire. Those are not aimed at anyone with an imagination, they are just aimed at tweens, thus making them "not Disney."

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