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  1. #31

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Its kind of like driving the subs in a long skinny aquarium type of effect...

  2. #32

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Some of the scenes have good depth of field, because they put the glass way far back. They broke up the appearance of the glass by adding coral and rockwork so you looked 'around' and 'through' the rocks at the show elements.

    And these were put in the spots in the ride where there's room for the extra depth - one of those would be where the dry-dock spur track is about halfway through on the 'left'.

    Other scenes where they had obstructions and/or want you to have a "Close-Up" have the dry-box right next to the track. The joys of making a 'new' ride fit in am old building.

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  3. #33

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    Misinformation central around here.....

    The show building is a giant concrete bathtub, with the 'floor' at one level throughout. The subs ride a concrete guide track, but are floating. The 'floor' level of the lagoon changes a bit, but the show building is flatter than flat once inside. The water level is constant, in the lagoon and in the show building (can't be any other way.)

    The subs never go 'dry' unless they are moved to the mini drydock backstage. The transition is simple - since the 'floor' is level, and the guideway is level, they move a simple track switch, the sub floats into the drydock, and a cofferdam (watertight door) separates the drydock from the show building. Pump the water from the drydock, and the sub is dry.

    Wierd fact - the roof of the show building is 19 inches thick, poured concrete. I've often wondered who came up with 19 inches as being the perfect thickness to hold up autopia. Not 18, not 20 - 19.

    The roof is supported by one wall and several columns, including a couple that support the monorail track above. The pathway for the subs gets a little narrow here and there, but in general is fairly wide. I have walked every inch of the building, both wet and dry - miserable, dank, noisy place.

    Regards;

    KotF

  4. #34

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Thanks for the info, KFrog! Sounds like you are CM on Builder in some capacity?

  5. #35

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    On a side note--stop using the term "depth of field" incorrectly! Depth of field refers to how much of a view, usually in photography, is in focus--how "deep" the in-focus area is, with defocused (blurry) areas located closer to the camera and further from the camera. It's affected by factors such as the distance to the in-focus area, the distances to other objects, the focal length of the lens (how "zoomed-in" it is), and how wide the lens' aperture is. In photos with shallow depth of field, the subject is in focus, but just about anything that's even just a little closer or further is out of focus. In photos with deep DOF, just about everything appears to be in focus. Your own eyes generally have a somewhat deep DOF, though you can see do the following to see the limitations of it. Hold one finger between you and your computer screen and focus on it. My words go blurry behind it, right? Now put another finger on your other hand up, to the left of the first finger and closer to you. If you're still focused on the first finger, you'll notice that both the text and the second finger are defocused, or blurry. At the moment, your eyes' depth of field encompasses the first finger and anything else that's approximately the same distance away, but not things that are significantly closer or further.

    Sorry, you may now return to your scheduled programming. And thank you very, very much for the cool info, KotF! I'm curious if you're a CM or you worked on the construction or what.


  6. #36

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    Re: Misinformation central around here.....

    Quote Originally Posted by King of the Frogs View Post
    Wierd fact - the roof of the show building is 19 inches thick, poured concrete. I've often wondered who came up with 19 inches as being the perfect thickness to hold up autopia. Not 18, not 20 - 19.


    KotF
    This is how they figured it out. The structural engineer took the length of the span, the applicable dead load, the anticipated live load, and the compressive strength of the concrete then did his calculations and presto-chango oh magnificent one the magic eight ball says 19 inches. Either that or the architect decided that to fit in properly with the surrounding area that the thickness needed to be 19 inches and said structural engineer developed a reinforcement plan that made 19 inches of concrete preform as required. The third possibility is that only 18 inches of concrete were required, but the engineer likes prime number. I am betting on either explanation one or two.
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  7. #37

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Quote Originally Posted by Applegeek View Post
    Thanks for the info, KFrog! Sounds like you are CM on Builder in some capacity?
    Repeat after me: "There's something that you don't see every day... But I do. Over, and Over..."

    Something tells me that he goes "swimming with the frogs" on a nightly basis, doing such exciting things like cleaning those windows that Nemo and Dory are cavorting on. Or comes in if something floating derails...
    Quote Originally Posted by Datameister View Post
    On a side note--stop using the term "depth of field" incorrectly! Depth of field refers to how much of a view, usually in photography, is in focus--how "deep" the in-focus area is, with defocused (blurry) areas located closer to the camera and further from the camera.
    <Big Snip>
    Sorry, you may now return to your scheduled programming. And thank you very, very much for the cool info, KotF! I'm curious if you're a CM or you worked on the construction or what.
    Yes, I know it's not "right", but we're talking a ride and not a camera. The terminology kinda sorta fits (if you get out a mallet and a chisel to round off the square peg a bit for the round hole) - you are deep, and with the projections way back there is a deep field of other stuff in front of it to see...
    Quote Originally Posted by mousechild View Post
    This is how they figured it out. The structural engineer took the length of the span, the applicable dead load, the anticipated live load, and the compressive strength of the concrete then did his calculations and presto-chango oh magnificent one the magic eight ball says 19 inches. Either that or the architect decided that to fit in properly with the surrounding area that the thickness needed to be 19 inches and said structural engineer developed a reinforcement plan that made 19 inches of concrete preform as required. The third possibility is that only 18 inches of concrete were required, but the engineer likes prime number. I am betting on either explanation one or two.
    Or the most likely - the calcs all said 18 inches would be enough, but the Engineer figured it's always better to overbuild a bit. They mention the car and light truck traffic when building a parking structure, but they never tell you about that 80,000 pound trash truck that comes through once a week...

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  8. #38

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Yes, I know it's not "right", but we're talking a ride and not a camera. The terminology kinda sorta fits (if you get out a mallet and a chisel to round off the square peg a bit for the round hole) - you are deep, and with the projections way back there is a deep field of other stuff in front of it to see...
    Sorry, but I'm the kind of guy who wants the peg to be either square or round. It doesn't fit right in either kind of hole if it's a rounded square.


  9. #39

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    Sorry, Bruce

    Not a CM, not a maintenance person, not a Disney employee.

    Just adding in my two cents worth, based on first-hand knowledge from many years.

    Sorry to upset your little apple cart with facts.

    Regards; KotF

  10. #40

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    Re: Misinformation central around here.....

    Quote Originally Posted by King of the Frogs View Post

    Wierd fact - the roof of the show building is 19 inches thick, poured concrete. I've often wondered who came up with 19 inches as being the perfect thickness to hold up autopia. Not 18, not 20 - 19.

    The roof is supported by one wall and several columns, including a couple that support the monorail track above. The pathway for the subs gets a little narrow here and there, but in general is fairly wide. I have walked every inch of the building, both wet and dry - miserable, dank, noisy place.

    Regards;

    KotF
    the Monorail Columns go allway to the ground and the show building do not support the monorail track.
    Yes some old picture of it.
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  11. #41

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    ^But that picture is of the new showbuilding addition, which was built around the existing monorail pylons. What about the original 1959-era show building?

  12. #42

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    The new show building was in fact built around the pylons but in all my time spent driving ... I can't recall ever seeing the pylons inside the older show building so I believe that they are supported by the roof.

  13. #43

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    So the little portholes are always underwater through out the ride including the show building right?

  14. #44

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    Re: Submarine Voyage Ride Building Layout/ Operator View?

    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyguy3 View Post
    So the little portholes are always underwater through out the ride including the show building right?
    Yes
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  15. #45

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    Re: Misinformation central around here.....

    Quote Originally Posted by akfandisney View Post
    the Monorail Cloumns go allway to the ground and the show building do not support the monorail track.
    Um...That's what he said.
    The roof is supported by one wall and several columns, including a couple [columns]that support the monorail track above.

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