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  1. #76

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    Re: An honest question

    Quote Originally Posted by vfire View Post
    You said people visited churches for the architecture and not the spectacle. Tourists visiting Harlem churches showed you were wrong.
    You should read more carefully--I said 'greatest cathedrals in the world' not 'churches'. In your haste to disagree with me, you fail to consider my post.


    You never visited a friend's church as a child, tween, teen or adult to see their method of worship? You never had a friend accompany you to your place of worship (if you had/have one) in your life? People don't visit religious houses just for the architecture and art
    I have never visited any of the great cathedrals of the world for the purpose of hearing a mass, attending an Episcopal communion, or to view the priestly vestments, no--I can do that in my own town.

    The original post I was commenting on was fkur's:
    And how would people feel if an actual Catholic church was built inside DL and Mass was offered on a daily basis? Would it be appropraite then to have guests file through during Mass to catch a glimpse and to treat it as edutainment?
    My comment was that spectators (whatever their motivation) are a common occurence in the great cathedrals around the globe all the time, and it doesn't seem to be much of a controversy. Tourists are constantly filing in during services to view the cathedral's interior. Some stop to watch if there are religious rites being performed as well.

    EDITED TO ADD: Apologies to the OP for the off-topic discussion--no further derailment from me will be forthcoming.
    Last edited by fo'c's'le swab; 03-06-2008 at 11:25 AM.

  2. #77

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    Re: An honest question [Indian Village]

    when we lived in Washington from 1987-2000 we had the opportunity to attend the yearly celebration of tribal life that was open to the public each spring. Numerous tribes of the northwest were represented and shared stories and crafts and performed dances and they also had races between the different tribes in their war canoes. My husband and I and our children enjoyed this yearly experience very much. I miss the Indian village that used to be a part of Frontierland and don't see why it couldn't be brought back. Sometimes I wonder if the people who are so eager to make sure everything is PC are not necessarily in touch with those most affected. I grew up going to school with many Indians of the local tribe and I believe that they are proud to share their history and would be proud to share it with the many DL visitors. So, long story short...I believe it can be done.

  3. #78

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    Re: An honest question [Indian Village]

    I think there are just too many tribes and variations of native culture (I call them natives simply to differentiate from people from india, where I live the government still officially uses the term Indian). There are so many tribes and I think the lumping of them together as one is not a legitimate idea yet, it's done frequently.

    I also think teaching about their culture without teaching about all the atrocities is wrong. I'm not native, I have 1 native forefather a very long time ago, but isn't relevant. I don't really say this in regards to offending natives in a "liberal" sense, but I disagree with it simply because it hides a very large portion of the truth out of sight from young ones. To me, I don't really care if it doesn't offend particular natives, I wouldn't want any young one of mine learning such a serious history in a fairy tailed manner. I think epcot would be a fine place for this, and I think you could include brief histories about the various wars and decimation. Disneyland isn't the place for controversial education, let them learn about this subject somewhere else, and let them learn much more about it.

  4. #79

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    Re: An honest question [Indian Village]

    Quote Originally Posted by Solz View Post
    I think there are just too many tribes and variations of native culture (I call them natives simply to differentiate from people from india, where I live the government still officially uses the term Indian). There are so many tribes and I think the lumping of them together as one is not a legitimate idea yet, it's done frequently.
    A meeting of many tribes... sometimes that "lump" was on purpose and was done by the organizers who at times were a "host tribe".

    I also think teaching about their culture without teaching about all the atrocities is wrong. I'm not native, I have 1 native forefather a very long time ago, but isn't relevant. I don't really say this in regards to offending natives in a "liberal" sense, but I disagree with it simply because it hides a very large portion of the truth out of sight from young ones. To me, I don't really care if it doesn't offend particular natives, I wouldn't want any young one of mine learning such a serious history in a fairy tailed manner. I think epcot would be a fine place for this, and I think you could include brief histories about the various wars and decimation. Disneyland isn't the place for controversial education, let them learn about this subject somewhere else, and let them learn much more about it.
    cited by many... there is a difference between hiding the truth (which I firmly do not believe in) and not touching upon the subject unless it is brought up.
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  5. #80

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    Re: An honest question [Indian Village]

    >>cited by many... there is a difference between hiding the truth (which I firmly do not believe in) and not touching upon the subject unless it is brought up.<<

    I just finished reading two books by Tony Hillerman, mysteries using the Navajo nation as a backdrop. While the series doesn't actively deny the bad things done to the Navajos by "belagaanas" (I probably spelled that incorrectly), it doesn't dwell on them either, instead choosing to enlighten about Dineh culture, history, mythology (am I going to get in trouble for calling it "mythology"?<G>), and ways of life today.

    I don't see why a Disney attraction couldn't do the same thing. Disney is excellent at this sort of structure. I wouldn't mind seeing some sort of attraction based on Indian culture and history, as long as it was done with respect and dignity.

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