Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    • Watch Your Language
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Planet D23
    Posts
    1,884

    Disney's Hong Kong Headache, Time Asia Magazine, 2006-5-8


    The launch of its new theme park got off to a rocky start, but Disney's still got an appetite for the China market

    Disneyland is supposed to be "The Happiest Place on Earth," but Liang Ning isn't too happy. The engineer brought his family to Disney's new theme park in Hong Kong from the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou one Saturday in April with high hopes, but by day's end, he was less than spellbound. "I wanted to forget the world and feel like I was in a fairytale," he says. Instead, he complains, "it's just not big enough" and "not very different from the amusement parks we have" in China. His seven-year-old daughter Yaqin disagrees, calling the park "fantastic," but her father grumbles: "If she wants to come again, "I'll send her with somebody else."

    Hong Kong's Magic Kingdom has so far been a little short on magic. The $1.8 billion theme park, which opened last September, was touted by Disney executives as its biggest, boldest effort to build its brand in China, a potentially vast new market for its toys, dvds and movies. The Hong Kong government—which aggressively wooed Disney and is the park's majority owner"hoped Disneyland would help secure the city's reputation as one of Asia's top tourist destinations. However, the conservative approach of Disney and its partner has produced a pint-sized park that so far hasn't matched visitors' lofty expectations. Hong Kong Disneyland has a mere 16 attractions—only one a classic Disney thrill ride, Space Mountain—compared to 52 at Disneyland Resort Paris. Meanwhile, management glitches involving everything from ticketing to employee relations have further tarnished the venture's image. In a recent survey conducted by Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 70% of the local residents polled said they had a more negative opinion of Disneyland since its opening. "Disney knows the theme-park business, but when it comes to understanding the Chinese guest, it's an entirely new ball game," says John Ap, an associate professor at the university's School of Hotel and Tourism Management.
    Nonetheless, Disney executives insist the park is on track. Jay Rasulo, chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, says: "I feel great about how Hong Kong Disneyland is doing." Disney's own surveys of park visitors show an 80% satisfaction rate, among the highest of any of the company's parks, says Rasulo: "People feel this is a great experience." The Burbank, California, headquartered company knows what it is talking about; it welcomed its 2 billionth visitor last week. And it is no stranger to tempestuous beginnings at an international park, at times caused by imposing a very American sensibility on foreign guests. When Disneyland Paris opened in 1992, Disney famously banned wine from park restaurants, much to the dismay of European bons vivants. In Hong Kong, Disney went out of its way to tailor the park to local tastes. Its "imagineers" installed Main Street's first Chinese eatery, along with Fantasy Gardens where Mickey Mouse, local favorite Mulan and other Disney characters reside so tourists can readily snap pictures with them—a priority for many Chinese visitors. Ironically, Disney's most high-profile stumble resulted from being too local. When executives decided to serve shark-fin soup, a Hong Kong favorite, environmentalists howled and Disney ignominiously yanked it from the menu.

    .................................................. ....


    Given the complexity of the Hong Kong operation, such "teething pains" are hardly surprising, says Rasulo. What may be tougher to solve, though, are the yawns the miniature park is generating among tourists. Rasulo says the park wasn't built on a grand scale because the Chinese didn't grow up with Disney and don't know the characters as well as Americans and Europeans do, which acts as a constraint on its potential audience. Ernest calls it a "great introductory park." They also point out that the company plans to keep adding new attractions at Hong Kong Disneyland, including an updated version of Disney's classic Autopia racing game, scheduled to open this summer. The government is reclaiming land on an adjoining site to expand the park further. But James Zoltak, editor of Amusement Business, a trade magazine for the theme-park industry, says Disney isn't moving quickly enough: it needs to "get on a crash course in terms of expansion. The rate of building it up has to be swifter than anything they've done at any of their parks."
    While Ernest concedes that attendance is "a little behind" expectations, Disney is sticking to its target of 5.6 million guests in its first year. To hit these numbers, Disney is running aggressive promotions. Last month, the park offered free tickets for 50,000 Hong Kong taxi drivers, says Susan Chan, Hong Kong Disneyland's director of publicity, so they "can experience the Disney magic themselves [and] better share it with their passengers." And even if attendance lags for a while, Disney says the park is already benefiting its other businesses in Asia. Andy Bird, president of Walt Disney International, says there's been "a noticeable lift in our brand and character awareness" in China since the park's opening—for example, sales of Buzz Lightyear merchandise have jumped, in part because the character features in Disneyland's popular Astro Blasters ride. David Miller, an analyst at investment-banking firm Sanders Morris Harris in Los Angeles, agrees: "Hong Kong Disneyland has been a solid success in terms of opening up the brand in China." Indeed, Disney continues to bet that its long-range investment plans in China will pay off, regardless of the recent headaches in Hong Kong. The firm is still in talks with Chinese officials about opening a mainland theme park, possibly in Shanghai, says Rasulo. "Have we made some mistakes?" he asks. "Absolutely. We are in a brand-new market. We have to keep listening and keep learning." Restoring Tinkerbell's health only requires a round of applause, but Hong Kong Disneyland will need a bit more work.
    Source: Time Asia Magazine (Click here for more details of the story)
    Last edited by HongKongDisneyland; 05-08-2006 at 06:11 AM.

  2. #2

    • Internet.Serious Business
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Perfect Park Acres, the latest in Hover-Burb Communities
    Posts
    4,824

    Re: Disney's Hong Kong Headache, Time Asia Magazine, 2006-5-8

    Ahh, more of the wonderfully anti-HKDL sediments from the Chinese news.

    it's just not big enough" and "not very different from the amusement parks we have"
    Size-wise he is right. But for all those other places that copy Disneyland cheaply...he wants to call Disneyland not unique? Oy.

    Hong Kong Disneyland has a mere 16 attractions—only one a classic Disney thrill ride, Space Mountain—compared to 52 at Disneyland Resort Paris.
    Ah, the good old news saying what they want hoping the readers don't know the difference. HDKL, v. DLP Resort. Ie 2 themeparks and a shopping area. Of course there will be more attractions. Why don't this writer try writing without letting thier agenda slip through?

    Andy Bird, president of Walt Disney International, says there's been "a noticeable lift in our brand and character awareness" in China since the park's opening—for example, sales of Buzz Lightyear merchandise have jumped, in part because the character features in Disneyland's popular Astro Blasters ride.
    Which I think goes to show know them or not, a good ride can make a charecter big. Mr Toad is a good example of this.

  3. #3

    • Minion FOREVER!
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Campbell, CA
    Posts
    3,023

    Re: Disney's Hong Kong Headache, Time Asia Magazine, 2006-5-8

    tloolgb, I agree with everything... but...
    Quote Originally Posted by tloolgb
    ...

    Which I think goes to show know them or not, a good ride can make a charecter big. Mr Toad is a good example of this.
    well, I agree with what you're saying... a good ride can definitely enhance the
    images of a character. In fact, IMHO, the "Mr Toad" ride is keeping the character alive.

    But I think saying "Mr Toad" is "big" is a bit of a stretch (at least now.)

    And I can't think of any ride that made a minor character "Big"... maybe the
    Witch King in TDL.

  4. #4

    • Minion
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Morva in the Land of Prydain
    Posts
    4,440

    Re: Disney's Hong Kong Headache, Time Asia Magazine, 2006-5-8

    ORDDU: Could it be you were meaning to say the Horned King in TDL, duckling? I've never known any witches--thus far--who were also kings.

  5. #5

    • Internet.Serious Business
    • Offline

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Perfect Park Acres, the latest in Hover-Burb Communities
    Posts
    4,824

    Re: Disney's Hong Kong Headache, Time Asia Magazine, 2006-5-8

    Quote Originally Posted by nish221
    But I think saying "Mr Toad" is "big" is a bit of a stretch (at least now.)

    And I can't think of any ride that made a minor character "Big"... maybe the
    Witch King in TDL.
    Okay, fair enough.

    ...but do you mean the Horned King? Witch King was the cool villian (one of them) in LoTR.

Similar Threads

  1. Hong Kong Disneyland going strong, UPI, 2006-9-4
    By HongKongDisneyland in forum Hong Kong Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-06-2006, 11:04 PM
  2. Hong Kong headache
    By DisneyMickey in forum Hong Kong Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-12-2006, 02:01 PM
  3. "Krispy Kreme" coming to Hong Kong and Macau by Fall 2006, Yahoo News, 2006-6-6
    By HongKongDisneyland in forum Hong Kong Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-11-2006, 08:38 AM
  4. Disney's Hong Kong Headache - TIME Magazine, 5/8/06
    By Darkbeer in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-08-2006, 06:39 PM
  5. Hong Kong retail sales up 11.6% in Jan 2006 - Business Week - 3/2/2006
    By HongKongDisneyland in forum Hong Kong Disneyland Resort
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-02-2006, 05:43 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •