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  1. #1

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    Peeling Car Paint Question

    Ok, a circle of paint on my car is peeling. (Please don't ask how it happened!). Is there some sort of sealent or glaze I can put over it to stop it from peeling more?
    TIA.
    Good morning, son
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  2. #2

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Is it peeling from oxydation? If so I dont think there's much you can do other than have it re-painted. There might be a sealer of some sort at an auto store but I'm not sure.

  3. #3

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    The paint on the hood of my old car started peeling bad a few years ago. I ended up having the whole hood repainted. When I got rid of the car last year the paint was starting to peel on the roof by the back window and on the trunk lid. Glad that's not my problem anymore.

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    It depends on whether or not the paint is peeling from the metal, or if by "my paint is peeling" you really mean that the clear coat has lifted from the paint. If the paint is in good shape, meaning not oxidized, then you can just repaint the clear coat. However, if the paint is lifting from the metal and primer underneath, usually based upon some type of solvent being spilled on the paint, then there's no other solution than stripping it to the metal, and reapplying primer, paint, and sealant.

  5. #5

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    We need more information about the car make and model (to figure out what kind of paint they used) and see the damaged area to give you an educated opinion. And you'll have to fess up as to what happened to the paint - was this mechanical damage from a roof rack or a flag, or did someone stick gum or a bumper sticker on the car and you pulled the paint off with it...

    About 10 - 12 years ago all the car-makers had to switch over to water-based and otherwise use less Volatile Organic Compounds (petroleum solvents) in car paints to meet emissions rules, and for a while the paint did not stick to the cars worth a darn, especially on hoods trunk-lids and roofs where they got full sun.

    And it was worse if the paint stuck to the primer, but they didn't do the surface prep right and the primer wasn't stuck to the steel...

    They finally have all that sorted out, but that doesn't help cars built during the "Beta Test" period. It still might mean sanding down the whole panel to bare metal, and starting fresh with proper metal etching prep, and proper primer and paint coats.

    If this is just the clear coat that's coming off, you may be able to wet-sand the edges of the divot and recoat just that area.

    And solid color paints can be spot-patched, but if it's a metallic paint you HAVE to have the whole panel repainted by a pro. The metal-flake bits in the paint means it has to be sprayed on exactly like the factory did it (direction of spray, heaviness of coat, thinner level of paint, cure time before recoat) or any patched areas will really stand out.

    Getting the car painted is cheap - there are a lot of shops that can do a good $150 paint job. But the surface prep is more critical than the paint, and you'll pay a lot more to have them prep the car body right first, and the "advertised special" gets you none of that.

    --<< Bruce >>--
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  6. #6

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Um, wow.
    I had no idea it was so confusing.

    I ran into a gate at work. It looked like it was past my lane, but it wasn't. I have a scratch and a circle of peeling paint. It's like the shiny part's coming up and there's dull paint underneath.

    It's a 2003 Chevy Cavalier.

    It will be all repainted eventually - she's all scratched up because my driveway's narrow and the turn is hard to navigate until you get the hang of it. But I'll be living here another year and a half so she won't be painted until after I move.

    That's why I was looking to a more temporary solution Maybe it I filed off the paint pieces that are sticking out?
    Good morning, son
    In twenty years from now
    Maybe we'll both sit down and have a few beers
    And I can tell you 'bout today
    And how I picked you up and everything changed
    It was pain
    Sunny days and rain
    I knew you'd feel the same things...





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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Well, the only temporary solution would be to keep a coat of wax on it at all times - that will help stop the peeling from spreading (although not for long), and will prevent rust or other complications. A good body shop can fix that for you in a day or two.

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    I doubt they used a clearcoat paint system on a Cavalier, but you never know...

    For now, I'd spot patch it as it gets banged up, if only to keep the dings from rusting and making a bigger mess. Chip out the loose paint, wet-sand down the base, prime, wet-sand, spot putty to fill in the divot - don't try to fill a big dent now, you use the putty so you don't have to build up the scratch with multiple coats of paint. Prime, wet-sand, paint, wet-sand, paint. And for clear-coat, you put on a coat or two of that last.

    If you just want to stop rust and camouflage the ding, you can sand, prime once and paint once, two coats a half-hour apart. Seal the surface, and be done in an hour of actual work.

    The hardest part is the waiting. You do this over the course of a Saturday - after each painting or wet-sanding step is done you go do something else around the house for 1/2 hour to 2 hours while it's drying, then come back and go on to the next step.

    Go to a local auto parts that does paint mixing and has car paint supplies, they can figure out what type paint was used from the factory for you, and make you up a 'maintenance kit'. Don't be scared, it only sounds complicated, but it's easy when you have the right supplies.

    A quart of paint mixed to match the car. A quart of the right primer. A quart of the right thinner/reducer for the paint and primer, an empty pint can for mixing your "gun-ready" thinned paint - the paint deliberately comes rather thick, and it's thinned down to meet the weather conditions, for some paints there are different thinners for summer and winter use...

    Strainer funnels for filling the gun, and a viscosity measuring cup (a ladle with a calibrated hole in the bottom, you time how long till it drains) to see when you have the paint thinned just right for spraying. Spot Putty and Glazing Compound for filling in the tiny dings and scratches, Bondo catalyzed resin filler for the medium dings. A variety of Wet-N-Dry sandpaper sheets and Scotchbrite pads for cleanup work.

    You will spend between $25 and $50 for the basic supplies, and get a big storage box to keep them together - a MUCH better investment than the little spray-cans of DupliColor paint. Done right, the proper repair is invisible past 5 feet.

    For the paint spraying, the cheap way is a Preval Sprayer that's a hybrid of an airbrush and a rattle can - disposable can of propellant and a glass bottle for the paint. Then you move up to an artist's airbrush for very small areas, and a touch-up size spray gun for bigger areas - up to a whole door.

    If you want to bake the paint on the patch so it dries faster, all it takes is a "brooder lamp" fixture (clamp lamp with a ceramic lamp socket), and a 250W IR Red Heatlamp bulb. Or two for big areas.

    Or you can get the supplies together and go to your local High School or College with an auto maintenance program, and leave the car for a few days. Let the students get graded on their mad bodywork and touch-up skillz.

    --<< Bruce >>--
    There's No Place Like 127.0.0.1

  9. #9

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Wow Bruce...
    Ok, well, I don't really have the extra money for that now - I mean, it's just my car, it's low on the list of expenses, unfortunately food and the dentist come first And yes, that does suond mega complicated and I very rarey have an entire day to devote to anything, at least in the next month or so!! Ther'e's also no way I can be without a car for a few days.

    I guess I'll just try to sand down the edges, and hope that nothing too bad happens to it until I can go get the whole thing done.

    Thanks for the help and confusion guys
    Good morning, son
    In twenty years from now
    Maybe we'll both sit down and have a few beers
    And I can tell you 'bout today
    And how I picked you up and everything changed
    It was pain
    Sunny days and rain
    I knew you'd feel the same things...





  10. #10

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    You only have to go the mega-complicated route if you want it to be a permanent patch.

    For people on a budget, go get some 1200 and 2400 grit Wet-N-Dry Sandpaper (50c a sheet), a 1/4 sheet rubber sanding block ($1) a spray can of the right color primer - light grey for light colors or black for dark ($3), and a spray can of the Dupli-Color touch up paint ($3). A roll of good masking tape ($1) and yesterday's newspaper for masking off the area (25c).

    Oh, and some water to flush the area as you sand (free).

    Even if the color match of the touch up paint is horrid, it will still prevent it from rusting. And it has to be done, or the rust will creep under the good paint and wreck the paint on the whole panel - especially if you are in the Rust Belt where they salt the roads. Or close to the ocean where everything gets salted naturally.

    Rust will quickly turn a nice $5,000 car into a $100 scrap value car, all it needs is a little toe-hold.

    --<< Bruce >>--


    Just think of it as "Arts And Crafts", not "work".
    There's No Place Like 127.0.0.1

  11. #11

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Ok, Bruse THAT sounds like something I can actually do and afford And I bet there's sandpaper in the garage somewhere!

    Luckily I live in LA, not near the beach! and park in a garage at work and home (I'm right spoiled!) so there's not LOTS of rust issues. But I'll def. get this done soon. It's no biggie if it doesn't match exactly - she already looks bad. and eventually it'll all be pretty again.
    Good morning, son
    In twenty years from now
    Maybe we'll both sit down and have a few beers
    And I can tell you 'bout today
    And how I picked you up and everything changed
    It was pain
    Sunny days and rain
    I knew you'd feel the same things...





  12. #12

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Whoa there! And when I say Whoa, I Means Whoa!!

    You can't just use any 40-80-150-220 grit garnet or aluminum oxide sandpaper you find in the junk drawer - most of it will be for woodworking and much too coarse, and you can make a much bigger mess of your car. The paint film on a car is a lot thinner than you think, it's not like house walls where you slop it on with a roller...

    There are lots of places you can take shortcuts, but this ain't one of them. Spend about $3 and get the Wet/Dry silicon carbide sandpaper, and do it wet - that way you flush away all the debris as you work so the paper doesn't load up and clog, and the dirt doesn't make any bigger scratches than you intended.

    You set the garden hose to a slow trickle (1 gallon per minute max) and hold or place it over the panel, so it's trickling down over the area you are working on. Wear slop-around clothes and don't worry about the splashing.

    And you start with the 1200-grit at the largest so you don't take off more paint than just the loose stuff - it sounds too fine, but it isn't. They use the 600-grit to peel the paint off large areas fast, and you don't want that.

    1800 is good for the primer coat before the paint, and 2400 is really fine, used to knock the lumps off an intermediate color coat.

    They make up to superfine 3600 for the final sanding of the color coat, but that stuff loads up with paint really easy even using the water - and you won't need it if you are just doing a fast-and-dirty patch.

    --<< Bruce >>--
    There's No Place Like 127.0.0.1

  13. #13

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    Re: Peeling Car Paint Question

    Well, I'll check the grade of the sandpaper that's around here. No worries, I wasn't going to just use any ole one

    I don't think we have a garden hose, but i'll check with the landlord to see. He probably has one that he'll let me use.

    Thanks again
    Good morning, son
    In twenty years from now
    Maybe we'll both sit down and have a few beers
    And I can tell you 'bout today
    And how I picked you up and everything changed
    It was pain
    Sunny days and rain
    I knew you'd feel the same things...





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