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  1. #1

    • Puppy Cuddles
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    Question I need art advice! Help!

    Hey everyone...I'm hoping you can give me some advice. I just bought two pieces from the Disney Gallery and I want to frame them, but do not know how to go about it. Both of them are printed on 18x24 paper, but the designs are only about 4x21.

    The way I see it, I have a few options. Option 1: Suck it up and buy two 18x24 frames to put them in. While this is more expensive, it would preserve the original paper. The problem with this is that these frames would take up a lot of wall space, which I don't really have. Plus, there's a LOT of white space around the design (and even if I get a couple of mats, I'm not so excited about all the empty space).

    Option 2: Cut them down so that I can buy two 10x24 frames instead. This takes care of my aversion to empty white around the pictures and it takes up less wall space. The obvious downside is that I have now cut the pictures, something I haven't yet been able to bring myself to do.

    I would appreciate anyone's advice on this matter. Has anyone else had to do the something similar? Please help me. Thanks everyone.
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  2. #2

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    Personally, I would not cut the prints down. I like a lot of negative space around art work...set's it apart.

    Cutting it down to 10/24 will make it quite slender in size. Is it portrait or landscape?

    But, even if you cut down the prints, you still have a few inches of border to fit in the 10X24 (actually only 3 for two sides). If you're planning on still matting the prints once cut, then you may want to opt for a larger frame. Or, do you want the frame to simply but up against the prints with out matting?

    Some places will custom frame and matte prints...though, they may be too costly for what its worth.
    Last edited by Cuzco-topia; 06-01-2005 at 02:44 PM.
    Marge: Barnacle Bill's Home Pregnancy Test? Homer, shouldn't we have gone with a better-known brand?
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  3. #3

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    That's the thing...I went to Aaron Brothers and just a custom matting will be like 30 dollars. I only paid 15 for each of the prints and tripling the cost seems a bit much. And I'd still have to buy frames. Maybe I'll check out Michael's cuz they have 50% off custom frame order deals all the time.

    In answer to your questions, they are landscape prints. No, I don't want the frames to butt up the the pictures. I like some dead space around them, which is why I'm leaning towards the 10x24. It's just that if I left the dead space as is, it's a good 7 inches aound the top and bottom. That's just a little too much for my tastes personally, but I'm willing to live with it if enough people scream at me "Are you crazy!? Don't you dare cut that print!!!"

    Thanks for your advice, Cuzco.
    The King is back and he's ready to kick some tail. Do not mess with a mouse in black.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Small Panda After All
    That's the thing...I went to Aaron Brothers and just a custom matting will be like 30 dollars. I only paid 15 for each of the prints and tripling the cost seems a bit much. And I'd still have to buy frames. Maybe I'll check out Michael's cuz they have 50% off custom frame order deals all the time.

    In answer to your questions, they are landscape prints. No, I don't want the frames to butt up the the pictures. I like some dead space around them, which is why I'm leaning towards the 10x24. It's just that if I left the dead space as is, it's a good 7 inches aound the top and bottom. That's just a little too much for my tastes personally, but I'm willing to live with it if enough people scream at me "Are you crazy!? Don't you dare cut that print!!!"

    Thanks for your advice, Cuzco.

    Just because you bought them for only 15 really doesn't mean much because Prints as well as original prints go up in value. Get a specially cut frame that fits an 18X24 with an opening just around the picture. That would cover white space but still, It's hanging on your wall so you have to arrange it to work your own space. Personally I like the Negative space around color art but that's just me.
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  5. #5

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    But if wall space is an issue, and you don't care about print value, go ahead and crop it down. Ultimately, it's what ever will make you happy. You could always get another print.
    Marge: Barnacle Bill's Home Pregnancy Test? Homer, shouldn't we have gone with a better-known brand?
    Homer: But Marge, this one came with a corn-cob pipe!
    Marge: [reading from the test box] "Ahoy, Maties! If the water turns blue, a baby for you! If purple ye see, no baby thar be!"
    Homer: So, which is it? Blue or purple?
    Marge: Pink.
    Homer: D'oh!
    Marge: "If ye test should fail, to a doctor set sail!"

  6. #6

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    I've been in and on the fringes of custom picture framing for years and can tell you that you did good in going to a frame shop for some ideas. At $15 a print I wouldn't worry about cutting them to fit your wall space or decrease your framing costs. They are unlikely to increase in value much since they were probably produced in a huge lot. Treat them as decorative art and enjoy them.

    It's very common for customers to bring a poster or $10 print into a shop for matting and framing and when they hear it's going to cost $150-200 to frame it they say, "But I only paid a few bucks for it!" Custom framing and matting is a luxury item. Only 10% of the population has ever had something framed and it's often a shock to first-timers.

    If you really like the prints and they are something you'd like to enjoy seeing on your walls for some years to come, someone who helps you choose matting and a frame can make them look like they came right off a gallery wall.

  7. #7

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    18X24" frames are cheaper and easier to come by than a stranger dimension.

    The white space, in a way, performs as a matte, in providing that space between the image and the frame. However, if that's too much for you, you could consider framing it with other things. Perhaps you have a treasured trinket, postcard, photo, etc. If you're going to look at getting it matted, consider having them incorporate those other things into the matte. That way, you can have 2 or 3 images/objects in the one frame.

    One other option is to look at getting a frame size where 24" is the small dimension, and the longer side is based upon overlapping the two images so that they share the "empty" space inbetween images (eg: overlap the white space). You can reduce the impact on your walls, get the images nicely matted and framed, and preserve their original dimensions at once. You'll still have the 7" at top and bottom, but you'll also have 7 inches between, so the whole thing will be spaced nicely and I think you'll prefer the look. Be advised, before trying to do anything on your own, that it is entirely likely that the bottom empty space is actually larger than the top, so if you're overlapping yourself, make sure the lower print is on top, so you're using the shorter dimension between images (there are specific aesthetic reasons for having a little more space at the bottom, oddly enough it makes them look more centered).

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  8. #8

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    Good post Morigoon. The tradition in matting has been to have a weighted bottom and that comes from years of hanging framed pieces high on the walls. It created an optical illusion by having more mat on the bottom.

    In the past few years the standard has gone back to just a little more on the bottom or none at all and equal distance all the way around. It depend on the art and the designer and the customer deciding what looks best for their particular room or space.

  9. #9

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    Oh my gosh, thank you all soo much! I love your idea Morigoon! That way I only have to buy one frame, plus it wouldn't seem like so much emptiness. I love all of your suggestions! You guys are the greatest!
    The King is back and he's ready to kick some tail. Do not mess with a mouse in black.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdweller
    I've been in and on the fringes of custom picture framing for years and can tell you that you did good in going to a frame shop for some ideas. At $15 a print I wouldn't worry about cutting them to fit your wall space or decrease your framing costs. They are unlikely to increase in value much since they were probably produced in a huge lot. Treat them as decorative art and enjoy them.

    It's very common for customers to bring a poster or $10 print into a shop for matting and framing and when they hear it's going to cost $150-200 to frame it they say, "But I only paid a few bucks for it!" Custom framing and matting is a luxury item. Only 10% of the population has ever had something framed and it's often a shock to first-timers.

    If you really like the prints and they are something you'd like to enjoy seeing on your walls for some years to come, someone who helps you choose matting and a frame can make them look like they came right off a gallery wall.
    150 to 200 hundred to frame something. Sheesh no wonder people freak. It costs me about 80 bucks now to get my 18X24 paintings framed but a fellow artist directed me towards his source to get it done cheaper.
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  11. #11

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    I have been wanting for YEARS to get my full-size attraction posters framed, but because they're 3' X4.5'... well, let's just say there isn't a ready-made frame (or even a build-your-own-frame piece) large enough. At this point, I think it's cheaper to get a router and a mitre saw, and make the darn thing myself (and that way I can make it exactly as I like... still have to pay for the acrylic "glass" part though...)

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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by PirateMunkee
    150 to 200 hundred to frame something. Sheesh no wonder people freak. It costs me about 80 bucks now to get my 18X24 paintings framed but a fellow artist directed me towards his source to get it done cheaper.
    Being an artist, I began matting and framing my own work in the early '60s and I've worked on and off in the business while having my own shop for nearly 10 years. You are fortunate to have found a framer who is willing to work with you on a volume basis...most will.

    The last place I worked did a lot of framing for Laguna Beach artists preparing for the summer art festivals. All of them told us that they wouldn't have made the sales if it weren't for our design and talent.

    Custom picture framing is a one of a kind effort involving many steps. Materials are expensive and it's very time consuming. With the advent of computerized mat cutters and underpinners, the industry has experienced some shortcuts in the process but it's still pretty much a handcrafted product. A superb framing job you really shouldn't notice. A bad bad one is the first thing one sees.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdweller
    Being an artist, I began matting and framing my own work in the early '60s and I've worked on and off in the business while having my own shop for nearly 10 years. You are fortunate to have found a framer who is willing to work with you on a volume basis...most will.

    The last place I worked did a lot of framing for Laguna Beach artists preparing for the summer art festivals. All of them told us that they wouldn't have made the sales if it weren't for our design and talent.

    Custom picture framing is a one of a kind effort involving many steps. Materials are expensive and it's very time consuming. With the advent of computerized mat cutters and underpinners, the industry has experienced some shortcuts in the process but it's still pretty much a handcrafted product. A superb framing job you really shouldn't notice. A bad bad one is the first thing one sees.
    I'm not knocking the framing professionals. If it weren't for them my paintings would look amatuerish. I'm just saying for people who don't know how to look for quality framers, they often go into these "Chain" framers who charge outrageous prices for something that could get done for cheaper. Alot of the people think that these mall framer's prices and the same for any framer when the truth is that they aren't. You just have to shop around and find someone who likes your art. Besides not only cutting you a deal, if they like your stuff, they put forth more effort to bring out the best with it.
    PirateMunkee

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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by PirateMunkee
    I'm not knocking the framing professionals. If it weren't for them my paintings would look amatuerish. I'm just saying for people who don't know how to look for quality framers, they often go into these "Chain" framers who charge outrageous prices for something that could get done for cheaper. Alot of the people think that these mall framer's prices and the same for any framer when the truth is that they aren't. You just have to shop around and find someone who likes your art. Besides not only cutting you a deal, if they like your stuff, they put forth more effort to bring out the best with it.
    I didn't think you were knocking the framing industry at all. It is a luxury item and many people are stunned when they bring something in and are quoted a price.

    Anyone would do well to avoid the chains. The shop I worked at in OC probably does 10% of their business from referrals by Aaron Bros. who won't do many complicated things. We also "fix" many mistakes by the chain or mall framers. They don't have nearly the selection of mats and mouldings, the one big chain doesn't sell papermats or regular glass which are the budget line of framing materials.

    It's an industry that is trying to reach a wider audience and many of the big moulding companies have been taking flashy ads in the glossy magazines for several years now.

    Many times I've seen customer teary eyed when they see how beautiful the finished work turned out.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdweller
    I didn't think you were knocking the framing industry at all. It is a luxury item and many people are stunned when they bring something in and are quoted a price.

    Anyone would do well to avoid the chains. The shop I worked at in OC probably does 10% of their business from referrals by Aaron Bros. who won't do many complicated things. We also "fix" many mistakes by the chain or mall framers. They don't have nearly the selection of mats and mouldings, the one big chain doesn't sell papermats or regular glass which are the budget line of framing materials.

    It's an industry that is trying to reach a wider audience and many of the big moulding companies have been taking flashy ads in the glossy magazines for several years now.

    Many times I've seen customer teary eyed when they see how beautiful the finished work turned out.
    Oh Yeah...It's all in the framing. I actually started looking into getting pre-cut frames through Blick art materials and Daniel Smith. Pretty cheap for pre-cuts.
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