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  1. #1

    • Winter in Oceanside...
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    Citrus trees as firewood

    We have an opportunity to get free firewood but it is old citrus (grapefruit, I think) trees. Anyone ever burn this in your fireplace (not an outdoor pit)? Is is good or should we just pass?

    (My 2,000th post. Yay!)

  2. #2

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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    I THINK it's ok, as long as it's properly dried out. I think we used to burn wood from our lemon tree in the fireplace when I was a kid. Eucalyptus is a wood you shouldn't burn, I know that. But I think citrus is ok.

  3. #3

    • Winter in Oceanside...
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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Thanks for giving an answer, O'Nut.

  4. #4

    • Married and happy again!!
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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by PrincessY View Post
    We have an opportunity to get free firewood but it is old citrus (grapefruit, I think) trees. Anyone ever burn this in your fireplace (not an outdoor pit)? Is is good or should we just pass?

    (My 2,000th post. Yay!)

    While I've never burnt citrus trees in the fireplace we have burnt old peach, plum and cherry when we have cut them down and they have burnt fine and smelled great. I'm sure it would be fine.
    Micechatter #5053 Looking for our new home in the WDW area! We need to get closer to our "Laughing Place"!























  5. #5

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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Google it and see if it's safe. I don't see why not, like other said, as long as it's dried out.

  6. #6

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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Why not Eucalyptus? Does it pop or smoke too much? I know it's not suitable for railroad ties because it's too soft (has to do with a story I heard about why Lake Forest has so many trees), but it's not a good burning wood either?

    Unusually and exceedingly peculiar and altogether quite impossible to describe...



  7. #7

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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Found this info on a firewood site -

    Wood Types
    OAK
    - Long burning, high BTU
    PINON - Clean burning, great smell
    EUCALYPTUS - Clean burning, high BTU
    CITRUS - hot clean burning
    PINE - easy starting, quick burning



    That's a quick list. So you know citrus is a good wood for fireplaces at least.

    Here's another:

    CITRUS
    COMMON NAME: CITRUS (ORANGE, GRAPEFRUIT, LEMON, TANGERINE)
    LATIN NAME: Citrus
    BRIEF DESCRIPTION: A once common and very poular, clean burning firewood, it is getting increasingly difficult to find.
    MAIN USES: A good all-around firewood. Preferred by people with allergies.
    EASE OF LIGHTING: Relatively easy to start for a hardwood. Kindling is advised.
    CLEAN TO HANDLE: Very clean to handle, usually without bark.
    CLEAN TO BURN: One of the cleanest burning woods available.
    LENGTH OF BURN: Burns longer than most softwoods and not as long as the better hardwoods.
    HEAT OUTPUT: It has a moderate heat output, not one of the hotter hardwoods.
    AROMA: When burning properly, the aroma is very, very light.
    CRACKLE/POP: Virtually no popping or crackle.
    SMOKE: When burning properly there is almost no smoke.
    COAL BED: Moderate coal bed, burns to a powdery ash.
    EASE TO SPLIT: Not very hard to split by hand.


    From The Old Farmer's Almanac -



    What are the best types of trees to use for firewood?
    It depends on your needs. Ash is good for kindling, oak for high heat, and apple for a wonderful aroma. Overall, hardwoods, like oak, burn better and longer. Softwoods, like pine, burn faster and tend to give off more creosote, which is not good for your chimney.




    Here's a more extensive list, from a different site:



    The Burning Properties of Wood

    Below is a list of the most common woods for burning, there are more. It is worth remembering that ALL wood will burn better if split.
    There is an old saying, "before starting a fire - collect the right wood." It is worth learning which wood is best for your fires as it will make life a lot easier. A natural result of tree recognition is to learn the burning properties of their woods
    Alder: Poor in heat and does not last,
    Apple: Splendid/ It bums slowly and steadily when dry, with little flame, but good heat. The scent is pleasing.
    Ash: Best burning wood; has both flame and heat, and will bum when green, though naturally not as well as when dry.
    Beech: A rival to ash, though not a close one, and only fair when green. If it has a fault, it is apt to shoot embers a long way.
    Birch: The heat is good but it burns quickly. The smell is pleasant.
    Cedar: Good when dry. Full of crackle and snap. It gives little flame but much heat, and the scent is beautiful.
    Cherry: Burns slowly, with good heat. Another wood with the advantage of scent.
    Chestnut: Mediocre. Apt to shoot embers. Small flame and heating power.
    Douglas Fir: Poor. Little flame or heat.
    Elder: Mediocre. Very smoky. Quick burner, with not much heat.
    Elm: Commonly offered for sale. To bum well it needs to be kept for two years. Even then it will smoke. Vary variable fuel.
    Hazel: Good.
    Holly: Good, will burn when green, but best when kept a season.
    Hornbeam: Almost as good as beech.
    Laburnum: Totally poisonous tree, acrid smoke, taints food and best never used.
    Larch: Crackly, scented, and fairly good for heat.
    Laurel: Has brilliant flame.
    Lime: Poor. Burns with dull flame.
    Maple: Good.
    Oak: The novelist's 'blazing fire of oaken logs' is fanciful, Oak is sparse in flame and the smoke is acrid, but dry old oak is excellent for heat, burning slowly and steadily until whole log collapses into cigar-like ash.
    Pear: A good heat and a good scent.
    Pine: Bums with a splendid flame, but apt to spit. The resinous Weymouth pine has a lovely scent and a cheerful blue flame.
    Plane: Burns pleasantly, but is apt to throw sparks if very dry. Plum. Good heat and scent.
    Plum: Good heat and aromatic.
    Poplar: Truly awful.
    Rhododendron: The thick old stems, being very tough, burn well.
    Robinia (Acacia): Burns slowly, with good heat, but with acrid smoke.
    Spruce: Burns too quickly and with too many sparks.
    Sycamore: Burns with a good flame, with moderate heat. Useless green.
    Thorn: Quite one of the best woods. Burns slowly, with great heat and little smoke. Walnut. Good, so is the scent.
    Walnut: Good, and so is the scent. Aromatic wood.
    Willow: Poor. It must be dry to use, and then it burns slowly, with little flame. Apt to spark.
    Yew: Last but among the best. Burns slowly, with fierce heat, and the scent is pleasant.

  8. #8

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    Re: Citrus trees as firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by TiaDalmaFan View Post
    Found this info on a firewood site -

    Wood Types
    OAK
    - Long burning, high BTU
    PINON - Clean burning, great smell
    EUCALYPTUS - Clean burning, high BTU
    CITRUS - hot clean burning
    PINE - easy starting, quick burning
    This is the exact info I found online, so I was surprised to hear someone saying eucalyptus was not good.

    Quote Originally Posted by TiaDalmaFan View Post
    CITRUS
    COMMON NAME: CITRUS (ORANGE, GRAPEFRUIT, LEMON, TANGERINE)
    LATIN NAME: Citrus
    BRIEF DESCRIPTION: A once common and very poular, clean burning firewood, it is getting increasingly difficult to find.
    MAIN USES: A good all-around firewood. Preferred by people with allergies.
    EASE OF LIGHTING: Relatively easy to start for a hardwood. Kindling is advised.
    CLEAN TO HANDLE: Very clean to handle, usually without bark.
    CLEAN TO BURN: One of the cleanest burning woods available.
    LENGTH OF BURN: Burns longer than most softwoods and not as long as the better hardwoods.
    HEAT OUTPUT: It has a moderate heat output, not one of the hotter hardwoods.
    AROMA: When burning properly, the aroma is very, very light.
    CRACKLE/POP: Virtually no popping or crackle.
    SMOKE: When burning properly there is almost no smoke.
    COAL BED: Moderate coal bed, burns to a powdery ash.
    EASE TO SPLIT: Not very hard to split by hand.
    I didn't find this and that is wonderful info! Especially the heat output. We're in SoCal so we don't want too hot a fire, but it is nice to have one for atmosphere (and not have to burn DuraFlame Logs). Thanks so much, TDFan!

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