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  1. #151

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyfann121 View Post
    Paying too much for an asset that may well have peaked already is hardly "smart business." Super hero movies are a trend, and who knows how long trends last? One thing we do know for sure is that trends are hot for a while, then they peak, and cool off. Sometimes they die off completely.

    An example of smart business would have been if Disney had scooped up Marvel when it was a penny stock, and then developed the Marvel characters themselves. Another example would be if they created another hot new franchise or trend themselves. They certainly have the money and resources to speculate, take some low risk/high reward chances, and see what catches on with the public. This is Disney; they're supposed to be a market leader, not a follower. They're supposed to blaze some trails; their founder certainly did, and he did it after starting from scratch.

    Instead, what are they doing? They are coming in late to the game (again), and paying a ridiculous sum to buy into a mature market. That is NOT smart business. That is chasing a hot trend; that is not leading and creating. Any moron with a deep pocket or big credit line can do that (until he runs out of money, of course). It's analagous to the amateur stock picker who jumps on the bandwagon of a hot stock, buying high then selling low when it deflates.

    You say Disney is doing this to stay in the game. You are talking as if super heroes were the only thing going. Sure, super hero movies are hot right now, but it's not as if they are the whole ball game. There are plenty of other kinds of movies that do very well at the box office, and some super hero movies have tanked (the first Hulk movie, Daredevil, Elektra).

    And what happens when the next big trend comes along, pioneered by someone else who had a lot more vision than Disney's short sighted management? Disney will roll out yet another belated multi-billion dollar acquisition? How long can they keep this up before sinking the entire ship in an ocean of debt?


    If you look at how long comic books have been around, you'll realize how long this "trend" is. It's no longer a trend. It's just... how things are. You can either accept that or don't.

    Disney sees the growth potential with Marvel, and maybe there's a lot of things in the works that have yet to be announced. From my understanding, comics and the toys, movies, television series, direct to dvd animation... those are all things that target not just young kids. They target the older men too.

    Potentially, this is the gift that keeps on giving. $4 billion may seem like a lot if it's not your thing I suppose.


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  2. #152

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    It is important to remember that Marvel comics has been around since 1939, as Timely Comics. Characters like Captain America predate many classic Disney characters. Comicbooks are not a trend or a fad. If they are, then so is Disneyland. Captain America has 14 more years of History than Disneyland. And neither are a fad or trend.

    Oh I actually came in here to say if I was a Marvel comics villian I would avoid all cliffs.

  3. #153

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    I want to see Donald saying "Don't make me angry. You would not like me angry" Then hulking out.

  4. #154

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    My worry is that the kidification will happen gradually, over years,
    It already happened many times in the past, or have you completely forgotten Spiderman and his Amazing Friends or the robot HERBIE from the Fantastic Four? The matchup I'd like to see? The Wasp vs Tinkerbell.
    Last edited by CL_CooledCoyote; 09-01-2009 at 02:53 AM.

  5. #155

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by Coheteboy View Post
    If you look at how long comic books have been around, you'll realize how long this "trend" is. It's no longer a trend. It's just... how things are. You can either accept that or don't.

    Disney sees the growth potential with Marvel, and maybe there's a lot of things in the works that have yet to be announced. From my understanding, comics and the toys, movies, television series, direct to dvd animation... those are all things that target not just young kids. They target the older men too.

    Potentially, this is the gift that keeps on giving. $4 billion may seem like a lot if it's not your thing I suppose.
    It is my thing. I happen to be a long time comic book fan, and current fan of super hero movies. I know Marvel comics have been around for a long time, and that Stan Lee co-created many of these characters in the 60s. None of that is the point.

    The point is that the current popularity of super hero movies is a trend. It's a recent phenomenon. And the only way to justify the $4 billion price for Marvel is if that popularity continues for a very long time. And who can assume that it will? No one knows how public tastes will shift, and it seems likely that the popularity of those movies has already peaked. If that trend/fad goes into long term decline, Disney has basically paid billions for a comic book company. So at worst, this could turn out to be a colossal blunder. At best? They overpaid and may eventually get their money back, but could have made much better use of four billion.

    What better use? Well, for example, they could have used $2 billion to make ten $200 million movies, and if just a couple of them become a big hit, that could spawn a couple more highly lucrative Pirates style movie franchises. Then they could have used the other $2 billion to reinvest in their theme parks, and turn all of them into the jewels that they should be. The theme park division has been the most consistent, steady money maker for Disney throughout the years, helping them ride out the volatile, erratic movie business. The parks should reach their full potential, instead of declining by degrees and suffering budget cuts.

    Well, look at the bright side, folks. Now they'll have another excuse to slash budgets to their parks, cuz they're soo poor and strapped for cash after their latest business misadventure

  6. #156

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyfann121 View Post
    The point is that the current popularity of super hero movies is a trend. It's a recent phenomenon.
    A trend that has been consistantly in movie theaters since what? The Captain Marvel matinee serial? Shazam!

  7. #157

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by CL_CooledCoyote View Post
    A trend that has been consistantly in movie theaters since what? The Captain Marvel matinee serial? Shazam!
    Please. Be serious. I'm talking about a very recent phenomenon: big budget features starring super heroes. Lately, they have been some of the biggest hits of the year at the box office. That's the trend/fad that prompted Disney to lay out big bucks for Marvel, and that's what they are praying will continue, to justify their latest big acquisition. They certainly didn't spend four billion in honor of 1940s matinee serials.

    Remember when T.V.-to-movie adaptations were the biggest thing in the movie biz? Now those have slowed to a trickle, as the box office revenues declined. Now some of you think the same can't happen to super heroes?
    Last edited by disneyfann121; 09-01-2009 at 04:09 AM.

  8. #158

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Believe it or not I am, you don't consider the Steve Reeve Superman or Michael Keaton Batman to be blockbusters of their time? The first Star Wars and the Jedi? Do we want to include James Bond and Indiana Jones? Douglas Fairbanks movies like The Mark of Zorro and Thief of Bagdad? Hey if you want to include dogs Rin Tin Tin saved Hollywood with the money his films made the studio. Matinee serials seem to be doing well too, Batman, Superman, Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers, The Rocketeer, (ok, maybe not all BIG hits) with The Green Hornet and Captain America in planning stages.
    Last edited by CL_CooledCoyote; 09-01-2009 at 04:38 AM.

  9. #159

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by seafaring_ghost View Post
    Reupping the contract with Stan Lee's Pow entertainment and now buying Marvel... what does it mean what does it mean.
    I think you may have just asked the four billion dollar question.


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  10. #160

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyfann121 View Post
    ...I'm talking about a very recent phenomenon: big budget features starring super heroes. Lately, they have been some of the biggest hits of the year at the box office. That's the trend/fad that prompted Disney to lay out big bucks for Marvel, and that's what they are praying will continue, to justify their latest big acquisition. They certainly didn't spend four billion in honor of 1940s matinee serials.

    Remember when T.V.-to-movie adaptations were the biggest thing in the movie biz? Now those have slowed to a trickle, as the box office revenues declined. Now some of you think the same can't happen to super heroes?
    At the end of the day, after all the swell beancounter blah-blah about exploiting brands and mining intellectual properties and strategic positioning, Disney is spending $4 billion on the whims and tastes of a bunch of 13-to 18-year-old boys.

    I dunno what's wackier, that or the monumental chutzpah to believe that da boyz are going to give them their $4 billion back, with interest -- and then earn them a handsome profit, year after year.


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  11. #161

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    My worry is that the kidification will happen gradually, over years, as Marvel executives and artists leave and are replaced by others. Look at the morphing of Winnie the Pooh from a charming family theatrical short in the mid-60's to mindless toddler-fodder today -- and most of that devolution took place in the last 7 years, pushed by the same branding executives who are drooling over the Marvel acquisition today.

    Consider the dumbing down by degrees of Disneyland attractions in the last 10 years. The company that used to give you Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion now spends big bucks on kiddie fare like Pooh, Nemo and (God help us) the New Tinker Bell.

    It's not that someone at Disney will give the order to kidify a Marvel character. It will happen over a period of time as the Marvel management midset inexorably changes to match Disney's mindset.

    Want to see where the creative vision and spirit of Marvel is headed over the long haul? Look at Disney itself in the last 25 years.


    There's already a kid line of Marvel toys. There's preschool toys that are big enough so a.) the kids don't swallow them and b.) kids can play with them. The storylines for them are already in place. It could be the Spiderman and Friend's line... I forget the name. All I know is when I saw them at Target I wanted. And how do you explain Wolverine to a 4 year old "so he's a guy that has claws that come out when he's angry or wants to help people because of a genetic fluke..." If you start them young they'll be life long fans. Kinda' good idea.

    Cohoteboy said something really true. Disney doesn't have a lot of "boy" properties. They have Pirates, the fledgling XD station, and awhile ago I thought I saw in a Disney store "Adventure Heroes" which were like Aladdin all buffed out in action figure style along with a Peter Pan the same way. And if I remember Disney's never had a really big "boy" core group. It's always been the little girls who wanted their Prince Charming. This could be a good move. If they put comic based cartoons on XD I'd watch. I'd love to watch episodes of X-men Evolution again. Such a neat series.

  12. #162

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Source deadlinehollywooddaily.com (perhaps the biggest explanation of the theme parks yet) - Lighttragic

    EXCLUSIVE: With help from a number of key sources inside and outside Universal studios and Universal theme parks, I've put together the latest info about which Marvel characters and which deal points Universal and Disney might fight over in coming months and years. And, trust me, there will be blood as pitbull lawyers on all sides tear apart the language of each and every contract clause. (This is exactly the sort of Big Media mortal combat that Disney and GE in-house attorneys, and their outside counsel -- oooh, those billable hours -- thrive on.) And yet Disney's Bob Iger and Universal's Ron Meyer are longtime pals. It remains to be seen if that relationship can withstand this confrontation.
    For starters, here's the main list of licensed characters at Marvel Island inside Universal Orlando's Islands Of Adventure (provided me by Universal): Spider-Man (also attraction), Dr. Doom (also attraction), Hulk (also attraction), Storm (also attraction), Captain America, Cyclops, Green Goblin, Rogue, Storm, Wolverine, "and lots more if you include stores and dining," a Uni exec tells me.
    Paramount tells me Iron Man and Thor also are included.
    According to other sources, here are the characters by Attractions, Walk Around, and Shop:
    Attractions (Characters licensed for the attraction use, but not necessarily for walk-around. Some in the attractions list are also licensed for walk-around, but not all.): Spider-Man, Doc Oc, Scream, Electro, Hydro-Man, Hobgoblin, J. Jonah Jameson, Hulk/Bruce Banner, Dr. Doom, Fantastic Four (as a group, not individually), Storm, Magneto, Professor X.
    Walk around and/or Shop: Green Goblin, Cyclops, Rogue, Wolverine, Fantastic 4 (restaurant / walk around), Captain America (restaurant / walk around), Kingpin (shop / walk around), Merch (shop)
    Complicating everything are several shows as well, both impromptu outdoor shows put on by Entertainment, and larger shows that were put on in conjunction with Universal Creative/Marvel. No one is sure what the status would be regarding those characters/properties. Regardless, informed sources tell me that if Universal wanted to reuse the characters, they'd only be able to use the characters in a similar way -- ie, the same show, or a similar show.
    I'm told that this is because the Universal-Marvel licensing contract is extremely narrow: Universal has to follow it to the letter, or they risk losing the characters altogether. Universal's parks group structures contracts so that there's a master licensing agreement for the Marvel name, and then individual sections for the properties. It's not a catch-all, you-have-a-blanket-license-to-use-any-Marvel-character-as-you-see-fit-in-your-parks, because Marvel's not stupid. And because Marvel owns high-profile characters (it's like this for most non-owned properties), Universal must get approval for any additional/future use of Marvel's characters so Universal doesn't use the characters in a way Marvel doesn't like. For that reason alone, Marvel has a big ol' out in their contract with regards to future use.
    The existing deals are in place, but if Universal had planned to use a Marvel character they hadn't used yet, they would obviously have to run it by Marvel for approvals. The way it works is a new addendum would then be drafted for that use/use of that character, and added to the master license agreement. The characters that are already used can continue to be used as they have been since they're part of the initial deal. But I'm told not to expect any new major characters introduced into the park, or existing ones expanded for use, though.
    Universal's current attractions are safe, as are the themed eateries/shops. Any Marvel characters not used presently by Universal will most certainly not be used from here on. The walk-around characters that are not connected to an attraction or eatery could be in danger, as that clause is more easily manipulated. The use of the characters for walk-around is usually a separate contract than the rides/overall naming rights, and is usually much more flexible. So these could be the first to go in the years to come. (Which is why that "we believe" may have been in Universal's initial statement to me...)
    As if this isn't complex enough, Universal Studios Hollywood actually had Marvel characters doing "streetmosphere" until January 2008, when they didn't renew the license. In fact, Marvel wanted an expansion of the brand into the park and pushed for an attraction to be built using their characters, like Islands Of Adventure. But Universal didn't want to spend the money. Also Marvel wanted more moolah for the licensing agreement renewal, which Universal wanted to cut back. In the end, Universal severed ties with Marvel for the West Coast park, while maintaining an amicable relationship for the Orlando park.
    Also, further entangling everyone and everything is the fact that Marvel is building their own Super Heroes park down the road from Universal's new park in the massive (and very delayed) Dubai-land project in the Middle East. The question here is whether Disney will now try to turn it into a Disney park or leave it as a Marvel park, or both, or neither.
    So what does the future hold?
    Obviously, Universal lawyers right now are scrutinizing their theme park licensing and merchandising contracts with Marvel. Universal at first issued to me this statement to me about the future of their theme park licensing pact with Marvel: "Marvel Super Hero Island at Universal’s Islands of Adventure and the Marvel characters are a beloved and important part of the Universal Orlando experience. They will remain so. Our guests are going to get to meet Spider-Man and all our other Marvel characters. We believe our agreement with Marvel stands and that the Disney/Marvel deal will have no impact on our guest experience."
    Hmm, interesting how there was a "we believe" in there. Sounded unsure. Then Universal updated its earlier statement to me to say this much more assuredly, "Marvel Super Hero Island at Universal’s Islands of Adventure and the Marvel characters are an important part of the Universal Orlando experience. They will remain so. Our agreement with Marvel stands for as long as we follow the terms of our existing contract and for as long as we want there to be a Marvel Super Hero Island."
    Privately, Universal execs told me they've got the Marvel characters "until the end of time if we want them" and used phrases like "in perpetuity". But here's the rub: a Universal insider tells me the theme parks only retain the existing characters it's already made use of. Sure there are Spider-Man and Hulk attractions, but what about the bulk of the 5,000 Marvel characters? Are those Disney's now?
    Those character rights revert to Marvel, so, Disney can start incorporating those Marvel characters immediately into Disney’s theme parks in California, Paris and Hong Kong. But it's important to note that the Disney/Marvel deal statement yesterday did not mention Marvel in connection with Disney theme parks. In fact, Disney may not be able to use the best known of the 5,000 Marvel characters to freshen its theme parks for some time. Because Universal theme parks have a long-term licensing deal with Marvel that gives Universal exclusive rights for Marvel characters east of the Mississippi for theme park use. Still, this leaves open options for Marvel characters at the California Disney parks, although some sources doubt the Mouse House would do that immediately, as it could contribute to brand confusion by having Marvel characters at Universal on one coast (in Orlando) and Disney on the other (in Anaheim).
    For specific characters/properties (i.e., ones where Universal has invested a huge amount of money, like the Spider-Man ride), the Universal/Marvel licenses are virtually in perpetuity and will outlast the rides themselves. My insiders predict that Disney will try to buy those characters out in the distant future -- probably when the rides are changed/closed or the entire Marvel Island is changed/closed.
    Finally, yesterday a Universal spokesperson told me that the studio has built in Marvel attractions not just at theme parks in Orlando and Osaka but also into future theme park plans. But an informed outside source tells me this isn't true and that Universal has no new attractions on the boards right now based on Marvel characters for Dubai or Singapore or even Orlando's Islands Of Adventure/Marvel Island. Instead, Universal is consumed with getting its new "Wizarding World Of Harry Potter" attraction with Warner Bros up and running.

  13. #163

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by ALIASd View Post
    The question is would NBC Universal be willing to sell off Universal?
    Everything has a price....

  14. #164

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    More interesting info :::: source deadlinehollywooddaily.com


    EXCLUSIVE: The first thing you should know is that Bob Iger has comic books in his blood. And the second thing you should know is that his ties to Marvel go back two generations. His late great-uncle (his grandfather's brother) was illustrator/cartoonist Jerry Iger, who partnered with illustrator/cartoonist Will Eisner back in the 1930s to create -- you guessed it -- the comic book packager Eisner & Iger Studios. I couldn't make up this stuff if I tried... (Blackthorne Publishing has released three compilations of Iger-related comics: The Iger Comics Kingdom, Jerry Iger's Classic Jumbo Comics, Jerry Iger's Classic National Comics, and Jerry Iger's Golden Features.) And their first hire was Jack Kirby, who as you know later became the co-creator of many of Marvel's best known characters with Stan Lee. So Bob Iger had an unusually rich appreciation for the comic book biz dating back to his childhood when his great-uncle would draw for him. Fast forward to Monday's Disney-Marvel deal, which I've learned was 10 years in conception, and three months in negotiation between Iger and Ike Perlmutter for the 7,000 Marvel characters -- that's right, 7,000, not the 5,000 number every media outlet keeps reporting including me.
    I'm told that, back in the 1990s, when Michael Eisner ran Disney and Bob Iger was his No. 2 (a teaming I liked to call FrankenEisner and Igor back then), the moguls had on-again, off-again coversations about acquiring Marvel. But there was never any attempt at a negotiation because "the brand didn't seem Disney," as a source tells me. Once Iger took over Disney as CEO, and recently embarked on its stock buyback, the Big Media company found itself sitting on excess cash even after investing in Pixar and everything else. That's when the troika of Iger, Tom Skaggs, Sr EVP/CFO, and Kevin Mayer, EVP of Corporate Strategy, Business Development and Technology Group, stepped up their look for growth opportunities. And Marvel came up again, this time much more seriously. Iger even discussed this directly with his division heads. It's a testament to Disney's limitless penchant for secrecy that even though about a dozen people knew Disney had decided to go after Marvel, there was no leak.
    In June, Iger flew to New York to meet with CEO Ike Perlmutter in his Marvel office. In a show of transparency, Iger had already let the wily but no-nonsense Israeli (who'd beaten back two billionaires, Ron Perelman and Carl Icahn, for control of Marvel) know that Disney was interested in buying Marvel and wanted to start negotiating. ("It would have been manipulative if I'd approached it any other way," Iger told a pal. "You know how that goes. Someone invites you for dinner. And, after a glass of wine, he tells you he wants to buy you. And the wine never tastes quite as good after that.")
    But Perlmutter expressed little interest in a deal, even though he liked Disney and all that the name, company, branding, implied. "I've heard good things about Disney. But I don't need to sell. I don't want to sell," Perlmutter told Iger, according to my insiders. But, eventually, Iger got to the heart of Perlmutter's objection: Ike didn't want to retire. He wanted to continue to work because Marvel was what he loved.
    As due diligence went on, Disney saw nothing in Marvel's books that indicated Marvel was under financial pressure or Perlmutter had any need to sell. So the price had to be right. From June to Sunday night, both sides eventually became "more comfortable" with the $4 billion valuation, according to my insiders. A little math shows that Perlmutter, who owns 37% of his public company, stands to reap $1.5 billion in cash and stock. Sources tell me that this sell-out has been Perlmutter's strategy all along. "This was always an acquisition play for Ike," one insider explains to me. "This deal with Disney just ups his game and creates shareholder value and lets him walk away a billionaire."
    Content-wise, the two moguls agreed that Marvel would continue to operate independently of the notoriously micro-managing Disney in the same way that Miramax did under the Weinstein Brothers. Though that probably won't make even hardcore fanboys feel better about the deal they're pissing on all over the Internet yesterday and today. (Given what Iger likes to refer to as the "combustion of digital word of mouth" that operates these days, Iger and Perlmutter have their work cut out for them trying to get skeptical fanboys to believe that Disney has no intention of altering the creative approach which Marvel takes to its comic books and movies. Of course, it helps the corporate confluence between the two companies that Marvel's movie fare has been and will be "PG-13".)
    Every subsequent meeting between Iger and Perlmutter took place in NY. Finally, it was late Sunday night, very late, that the deal was done. There was no celebration. Both moguls went back to their respective homes to get ready for Monday's early morning announcement.
    One more thing you should know: I've learned that, for the past 2 months, Iger has been reading the new Marvel Encyclopedia to soak up the backstories of all the Marvel characters and comics.

  15. #165

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    Re: Spiderman and Hulk move into Fantasyland (Disney to buy Marvel for $4 Billion)

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyfann121 View Post
    Please. Be serious. I'm talking about a very recent phenomenon: big budget features starring super heroes.

    You're looking at ONE aspect though... and even I don't think it's a phenomenon anymore. Superman the movie in 1978 was a phenomenon. It was a comic book movie done right - but look at Superman's history. He had radio serials, various forms of live action series, animated Max Fleischer cartoons, Justice League of America and Superfriends cartoons in the 70s.

    Okay so Superman is not Marvel obviously but my point is, America has been in love with superheroes and comics for a VERY long time. This "recent phenomenon" of yours is not all that recent. Even Spider-Man was a major hit long before Sam Raimi had anything to do with it.

    Big budget motion pictures has been more noticeable recently for Marvel because why? Because studios finally realized how much money could be made if they took it seriously? if you do some digging, you'll find that this has been a long time in the making.






    1944 Captain America (serial)

    1978 Dr. Strange (television)

    1979 Captain America, Captain America II: Death Too Soon (television)

    1986 Howard the Duck

    1989 The Punisher

    1990 Captain America (direct to video)

    1991 Power Pack (television unreleased)

    1994 Fantastic Four (unreleased)

    1996 Generation X (television)

    1998 Blade, Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (television pilot)

    2000 X-Men

    2002 Blade II, Spider-Man

    2003 Daredevil, X2, Hulk

    2004 The Punisher, Spider-Man 2, Blade Trinity

    2005 Elektra, Fantastic Four, Man-Thing

    2006 X-Men: The Last Stand, Ultimate Avengers (animated), Ultimate Avengers 2 (animated)

    2007 Ghost Rider, Spider-Man 3, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, The Invincible Iron Man (animated), Doctor Strange: The Sorcerer Supreme (animated)

    2008 Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Punisher: War Zone, Next Avengers: Heroes of Tomorrow (animated)

    2009 X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Hulk VS (aninmated)



    to the future:

    2010 Iron Man 2, Planet Hulk (animated)


    Announced:

    2011 Spider-Man 4, Thor, The First Avenger: Captain America, Thor: Tales of Asgard (animated)

    2012 The Avengers

    TBA: Deadpool
    TBA: X-Men Origins: Wolverine 2




    Do you see the phenomenon or trend? What I see is a slew of product that hasn't stopped in the last 10 years and doesn't show any signs of slowing down.

    Disney, with the exception of 99% of their direct to dvd movies, means quality entertainment. Marvel has become just that. We can debate whether or not this was a good decision till the cows come home but you cannot deny how big this property is.

    It's not just movies. It's a library of characters and unlimited potential. Disney isn't buying a phenomenon. They're buying into something that will be there for generations, just as it already has been.


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