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  1. #46

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011



    3rd teaser one-sheet

    Walt Disney Animation Studios returns to the Hundred Acre Wood with Winnie the Pooh. Featuring the timeless charm, wit and whimsy of the original featurettes, this all-new movie reunites audiences with the philosophical “bear of very little brain” and friends Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, Owl, Kanga, Roo—and last, but certainly not least, Eeyore, who has lost his tail. “Ever have one of those days where you just can’t win, Eeyore?” asks Pooh. Owl sends the whole gang on a wild quest to save Christopher Robin from an imaginary culprit. It turns out to be a very busy day for a bear who simply set out to find some honey. Inspired by three stories from A.A. Milne’s books in Disney’s classic, hand-drawn art style, Winnie the Pooh hits theaters in Europe and Latin America in Spring 2011; the U.S. release date is July 15, 2011.


    Notes:
    • Veteran Disney animator/storyman/director Burny Mattinson (a key animator on the 1974 featurette Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too!) serves as senior story artist, with a dynamic young directing duo—Stephen Anderson and Don Hall—at the helm.
    • Director Stephen Anderson helmed animated films Meet the Robinsons and Journey Beneath the Sea, among others; he worked as a story supervisor on Brother Bear and The Emperor’s New Groove, and as an additional story artist on 2008’s award-winning Bolt. Director Don Hall is a veteran story artist at Walt Disney Animation Studios with credits including The Princess and the Frog, Meet the Robinsons, Brother Bear, Home on the Range, The Emperor’s New Groove and Tarzan.
    • Winnie the Pooh welcomes a few new voices to the Hundred Acre Wood: Craig Ferguson (The Late Show with Craig Ferguson), Tom Kenny (SpongeBob SquarePants) and Bud Luckey (director of the Pixar short Boundin’).
    • Actress/musician/singer/songwriter Zooey Deschanel (Indie folk band,“She & Him) provides the vocals for a special rendition of the beloved Winnie the Pooh theme song.
    • London-born A.A. Milne (1882-1956), a noted writer and playwright, penned two books and several poems about the beloved Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin (named after Milne’s son). His books are actually collections of stories, three of which inspired the film.
    • A.A. Milne’s son’s teddy bear inspired the beloved character. The child named his bear after Winnie, a Canadian black bear from London Zoo. Pooh was the name of a swan they encountered together.
    • Filmmakers visited Ashdown Forest where Milne wrote the books and the real Christopher Robin spent his summer vacations.
    • Tony® Award-winning songwriter Bobby Lopez, and his wife Kristen, wrote the six spirited new songs for Pooh and his pals, including “The Tummy Song,” “A Very Important Thing To Do,” “Everything Is Honey,” “The Winner Song,” “The Backson Song” and “It’s Gonna Be Great.” Lopez is composer on several episodes of The Wonder Pets, which earned a Daytime Emmy® in 2006 for Outstanding Achievement in Music Direction and Composition.
    Inspired by three stories from A.A. Milne’s books in Disney’s classic, hand-drawn art style,

    Walt Disney Animation Studios’ “Winnie the Pooh” reunites audiences with the honey-loving, philosophical bear and friends Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, Owl, Kanga, Roo and Eeyore
    in a wild quest to save Christopher Robin from an imaginary culprit.
    Walt Disney Releases New Poster for “Winnie The Pooh” | Cartoon Brew: Leading the Animation Conversation

  2. #47

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  3. #48

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Interview with Andrea Deja from french site, CloneWeb

    Andreas Deja, 54, is an animator for Disney Animation Studio, a colleague of Glen Keane.


    It began in 1985 to work on The Black Cauldron, was chained with the supervision of Roger Rabbit for the film of the same name and then found himself working on some famous characters from the company: King Triton, Jafar Scar or Hercules.

    He also participated in Fantasia 2000 and the Rhapsody in Blue sequence. More recently, he drew Mama Odie in The Princess and the Frog.

    He was in Paris a few days ago for Winnie the Pooh in theaters on April 13 and for which he animated Tigger. He was kind enough to answer my questions, also citing his previous work and projects of the studio.


    The world of Winnie is intended for children younger than the general public of the other Disney movies. Was it frustrating? I feel it's like to play with something very fragile, we can not do anything you want.


    No, because, for me anyway, I think that can animate everything I love. I could not animate something that does not please me personally, and I love these characters. They live in this world of children, the stories are very sensitive and preposterous. There was no big action scenes, as in other films. Go into this kind of universe lets you focus more on personalities and let the characters interact, as in The Jungle Book, one of my favorite Disney. The story is very simple, we focus on the characters. It's the same with Winnie.

    full translated interview at:
    Google Translate
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  4. #49

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Winnie The Pooh Clip - Get Us Out Of Here!

    YouTube - Winnie The Pooh Clip - Get Us Out Of Here!
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  5. #50

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    ^lol


    I'm going to love this next Pooh movie....unless of course if it drags on in the middle

  6. #51

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    First industry trades review:

    Disney refurbishes a franchise that's been one of its reliable little goldmines for half a century with Winnie the Pooh. A seamless narrative rather than a collection of segments in the manner of The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh in 1977, this gentle, lovingly wrought, for-tots-and-parents-only resuscitation of A.A. Milne's characters may have unintentionally set a Hollywood record of sorts: It's 69 minutes long, including 10 devoted to the credits, meaning that 14.5 per cent of the running time details who worked on the film, including production babies (arguable feature length for the program is reached by tacking on a six-minute opening cartoon, The Ballad of Nessie, about the Loch Ness monster's self-created lake of tears).

    Whether or not Disney Animation always intended that the feature proper would come at under an hour, the film will be a first weekend matinee choice for more than a few preschooler families (there's no weeknight audience for it) before becoming a staple homevid and TV title.

    The defiantly low-tech offering bows in France on April 13, in the U.K. and Germany the next day and in seven other territories in advance of the July 15 U.S. launch.

    So definitive are the soft, simple, pastel evocations of the English countryside in E.H. Shepard's original Pooh illustrations that revisionist versions would be unthinkable. Directors Stephen J. Anderson and Don Hall (director and a writer, respectively, on Meet the Robinsons) do nothing to rock the boat, delivering rich, beautifully rendered visual backdrops for the mild antics of the familiar characters.
    full review at:
    Winnie the Pooh: Movie Review - The Hollywood Reporter
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    ^does not make me what to see it........I'm less excited now I thought it was a Disney movies made for everyone like Tangled or Princess and the Frog not 5 year olds....or at least thats how the trailers advertise it for teens/young adults

  8. #53

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Fortunately Walt Disney had a greater vision for what his studio could create* and understanding of what his audiences could enjoy and embrace:

    As early as 1937, Walt sought the screen rights, and continued to pursue this Pooh-ticular property over the years (wisely ignoring a 1938 analysis stating that the Hundred Acre Wood happenings were an unacceptable animation subject as none of the stories "contains anything even resembling a plot") but it wasn't until 1961 that he acquired the rights. In bringing Winnie the Pooh to Disney animation, Walt's goal was to retain the delicate whimsy of Milne's wonderfully fanciful literary work. "It was a real challenge to put Pooh on film and retain his intrinsic innocence and sweetness," stated director Woolie Reitherman, one of Walt's legendary Nine Old Men. "Most cartoons nowadays rely on slapstick and a lot of action. But in Pooh there isn't any of that. The beauty is in the tenderness and warmth of the characters."
    The film is rated G, for general audiences - as broad a spectrum of audience that exists. (Not just teen and young adults...(?), maybe you're thinking of the trailer for 'Captain America'.)
    Including hopefully those that love traditional animation, storytelling and can appreciate their cinematic joys as described in the review above:

    So definitive are the soft, simple, pastel evocations of the English countryside in E.H. Shepard's original Pooh illustrations that revisionist versions would be unthinkable. Directors Stephen J. Anderson and Don Hall (director and a writer, respectively, on Meet the Robinsons) do nothing to rock the boat, delivering rich, beautifully rendered visual backdrops for the mild antics of the familiar characters.


    *All Facts, No Fluff and Stuff
    D23: The Official Disney Fan Club
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  9. #54

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Here in the States, we have to wait until 15 July, but WINNIE THE POOH, Walt Disney Animation Studios' 51st feature, is now playing in Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, and the UK! We hope you folks enjoy the show, which includes our newest short, "The Ballad of Nessie" - and wait until the end of the credits!
    (Don't spoil the surprise for everyone else!)
    ARL: Animation Research Library | Facebook
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  10. #55

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    So excited , I have the opportunity to see these new films tomorrow evening, can't wait!




    "Everything Is Honey" visual development art by Lorelay Bove/Walt Disney Animation Studios

    and her poster for the new accompanying short



    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  11. #56

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    I saw both 'Winnie The Pooh' and 'The Ballad of Nessie' at a screening last night with a nearly packed family-filled audience, the perfect match for this fabulous new pair. The 'Nessie' short is darling and a wonderful throwback to the studio's first animation golden age. Narrated by Billy Connolly with his fullest Scottish accent we're whisked into a very unique environment with funny and terrifically- designed characters and even an in-house shout out . Such a treat to finally see this long-gestating short up on the big screen.

    'Winnie The Pooh' is a wonder as well. A surprising combination of real warmth, humor and childhood nostalgia. The hand-drawn animation is a glorious thing to behold and a true tribute to the "Nine Old Men" who animated and directed the first Disney Pooh film. A terrific nod as well to the co-directors Stephen Anderson and Don Hall for giving us a modern Pooh taht doesn't stray to far from our memories of the earlier films. Andrea Deja's Tigger is a hoot and a half, especially coming from the big cat master that gave life to Scar in 'The Lion King'. I'm sure it's not lost on him that his hero Disney Legend Milt Kahl animated both Tigger and 'The Jungle Book's Shere Kahn. Art Director Paul Felix bathes us in a gorgeous, lush 100 Acre Woods unlike any seen on screen before. In some scenes it almost threatens to overtake the characters with the sheer lovliness surrounding them. The songs are fun and bouncy not unlike the characters. My favorite was the Busby Berkeley-esque 'Everything is Honey' song sequence directed by Eric Goldberg. As he did with 'Almost There' in 'The Princess and the Frog' Goldberg manages to create a separate film-within-a-film showstopper that still fits nicely with the overall experience.

    Can't wait to see it again when it opens this weekend.
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Elsewhere at the Friday box office, Disney Animation Studios' Winnie the Pooh was off to a solid start, grossing $2.9 million on Friday and on track to gross $7 million or $8 million for the weekend. The film looks like it's succeeding in luring tots too young for the PG-13 Potter. It received an A- CinemaScore, with those under 18 giving it an A+.
    Box Office Report: 'Harry Potter' Grosses Record $92.1 Million on Friday - The Hollywood Reporter

  13. #58

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    The only film brave enough to open opposite the "Harry Potter" juggernaut this weekend was "Winnie the Pooh," Disney's attempt to reintroduce the iconic honey-loving bear to modern audiences. But the hand-drawn animated film, rated G, mustered only $8 million in ticket sales.

    Those who saw "Pooh" -- an audience dominated by families, which accounted for 85% of those who saw the movie -- liked it, giving it an average grade of A-. Disney, which spent about $30 million to produce the movie, can only hope that the strong grade will help "Pooh" hold up well in the coming weeks as the "Harry Potter" buzz begins to fade.
    Box Office: Final 'Harry Potter' film has highest-grossing domestic opening of all time - latimes.com

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Such a shame that they didn't release this outside of the summer. By pitting Winnie the Pooh against Harry Potter, they're all but asking it to become discovered on Blu-ray. This movie deserved a lot better, IMO.
    Check out the Mousterpiece Cinema podcast on iTunes, on Twitter, on Facebook, or on the show's blog!

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    Re: 'Winnie the Pooh' 7/15/2011

    Quote Originally Posted by JerrodDRagon View Post
    ^does not make me what to see it........I'm less excited now I thought it was a Disney movies made for everyone like Tangled or Princess and the Frog not 5 year olds....or at least thats how the trailers advertise it for teens/young adults
    This is not a kiddie movie - I think it's something everyone can enjoy. I'm a male, college-age athlete, and this was far and away my favorite movie of the year.

    Those are my feelings in a nutshell. If you don't mind reading a wall of text, I've written a full review. There are some spoilers, but I've concealed them.

    I've been looking forward to Winnie the Pooh all year. Despite all the buildup I had done in my mind, Winnie the Pooh delivered in spades and even exceeded expectations to become, as of now and most likely for good, the best movie of 2011 - a cinematic year in which, despite the reams of garbage that have been produced, I've throughly enjoyed every film I've taken the time to see in theaters, especially Rango and On Stranger Tides.

    What I liked most of all was the humor. Winnie the Pooh was hilarious throughout the entire film and hysterical in some parts. The carefree, charming comic style perfectly recalls the spirit of the original featurettes, and I was highly amused by all the wordplay, one-liners (especially Eeyore’s deadpan comments and Owl’s not-so-highbrow meanderings), and physical humor. Of course the usual suspects, Pooh, Eeyore, and Tigger, were on the top of their comic game. Owl, Rabbit, and Piglet had me in stitches a few times,
    Spoiler
    especially during the scene where they all got stuck in the hole, which was also the funniest scene in the movie
    . The aggregate of these elements helped produce a hilarious film that makes this film, more than any other element, a worthy entry into the Pooh franchise. The witty writing, more than anything else, makes this movie resonate with adults. This is perhaps the strongest testament to the quality of the work: adults' positive impressions of this film won’t be skewed by rose-colored nostalgia, but there is genuine, transcendent humor that allows the film to succeed independently of the original cartoons and stand on its own merits.

    For the sake of brevity and completeness, I’ll give a general compliment to all of the voice actors for this film before highlighting my favorites. They demonstrated deep understanding of their characters and imparted the proper tone, cadence, and timing into their every line. Particularly noteworthy were the performances of Bud Luckey as Eeyore and Craig Ferguson as Owl. Ferguson captured perfectly Owl’s eccentricity and slight imperiousness. A Bud Luckey vocal performance always makes a movie that much more marvelous, and hearing Bud voice my favorite Pooh character is doubly marvelous. His voice is perfect for the role.

    The lush watercolor backgrounds and xerography motif faithfully recreate the Hundred Acre Wood that I loved from the original featurettes.
    Spoiler
    The chalk drawing sequence and Pooh's hallucination were clever, engaging ways of conveying the narrative in those particular scenes
    . It would have been all for naught without the vivacious and expressive character animation that we’ve come to expect from Disney and Pixar. Just so I don’t feel like I’ve left anyone out before mentioning specifics, I’d like to compliment all of the supervising animators for their brilliant artwork. In particular, Dale Baer’s facial expressions for Owl nicely compliment the vocal performance to accentuate the character’s charming, idiosyncratic personality. Eric Goldberg’s work is always a feast for the eyes. The comedy intrinsic to his style is evident in Rabbit’s memorable poses, expressions, and movements, particularly when
    Spoiler
    the character leads the backson hunt
    . Eeyore is also the beneficiary of animation that noticeably compliments the vocal performance, courtesy of Randy Haycock, but the work he does when the character is not speaking is more important. The amusing expressions he gives Eeyore are highly communicative of his thoughts. My favorite example is
    Spoiler
    the “Holy crap” look he dons during the “It’s Gonna Be Great” number with Tigger
    .

    And speaking of songs, the music in this film is superb. One would have never guessed that the Sherman Brothers did not do the songs if one had not been privy to that information beforehand. That is to the movie’s credit. I find it amusing that one of the co-creators of Avenue Q was picked for this project, but Robert Lopez and his wife were precisely the right people for this job. All of the songs make commendable additions to the Pooh songbook. Catchy melodies and whimsical lyrics abound. These tunes seamlessly integrate into the well-established atmosphere of the Pooh series. I’d be hard-pressed to pick a favorite, but I would like to mention
    Spoiler
    that I liked the use of “The Winner Song” as a bit of recursive humor
    . Zooey Deschanel’s voice is well-suited to the types of songs in which she features. Her folksy rendition of the Pooh theme song is very pleasant. And last, but not least, Henry Jackman’s score exquisitely evokes the carefree essence of the Hundred Acre Wood.

    This film is short, but the length perfectly suits the material. There is no filler to make the film longer. Every moment in this film brims with humor and heart. Of course one might crave more just because the movie is so good, but to add more would be unnecessary and risk blemishing something that is already perfect. This movie is rather like Dumbo: short, sweet, masterful.

    The film’s tone accurately recalls the joyful, happy-go-lucky feel of the original featurettes, and that is a very good thing. I appreciate the conscious effort by the filmmakers to keep the tone light throughout the duration. There is no forced, uncharacteristic melodrama or angst to damper the proceedings. When used prudently, these elements form an integral part to the success of many films that I love, but these are not prerequisites for high artistic caliber in cinema. Indeed, Winnie the Pooh is a movie of high artistic caliber. The filmmakers did not morph Pooh into something humorless and unfamiliar by trying to blow it up into something epic, something edgy, or a cynical send-up of the originals. I’m very grateful that they stayed true to the elements that make Pooh successful: sincere charm and simple fun.

    1000000/10, A++++, Six stars out of four…no rating scale can contain the greatness of this movie. Winnie the Pooh truly is something special to have left such an impression on me. Go see it. You’ll be glad you did (and it could use all the help it can get at the box office against the Harry Potter finale). See it twice and tell your friends – it’s well worth repeat viewings, and that’s something I plan to do sooner rather than later.

    P.S. The Ballad of Nessie was a cute, little treat. Make sure you get to the theater early so that you don't miss it!

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