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Michael Eisner's nemeses now have something to say to the folks at Intrado.

Roy Disney, his adviser Stanley Gold and other members of the Disney family have spent nearly $6 million to purchase 6.2 percent of the Longmont-based company that specializes in software for emergency 911 calls.

Disney and Gold, through their investment vehicle, Shamrock Activist Value Fund, say Intrado's stock is undervalued. They "have met, and may from time to time in the future meet, with the board of directors and management of the company to discuss ideas to increase shareholder value," Shamrock said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing Thursday.

The Shamrock investors also will talk to other shareholders and "industry participants," they said. They reserve the right to seek seats on the Intrado board.

Intrado couldn't be reached for comment late Thursday.

Roy Disney is the nephew of Walt Disney, the founder of the legendary entertainment company. He and Gold served on Disney's board, where they agitated against Chairman and CEO Michael Eisner.

In spring 2004, shareholders withheld 45 percent of votes from Eisner, a startlingly high total. He resigned his chairmanship and subsequently announced his retirement.

Disney recently named Robert Iger to succeed him. Roy Disney and Gold no longer sit on the Walt Disney board.

Roy Disney is, however, still busy. He has a variety of investment funds using the "Shamrock" name that hold positions in a number of companies.

In fall 2004, Disney and Gold began marketing the Shamrock Activist Value Fund as a new investment pool to buy and fix companies with corporate governance problems, according to an article in the New York Post. The newspaper called it "a new crusade - stamping out Michael Eisner-type bosses everywhere he can find them - and making a bundle doing it."

Intrado is the second company this week in which the Shamrock Activist Value Fund disclosed a position. Monday, the fund said it spent $26.9 million to buy 7.2 percent of -iPass, a Redwood Shores, Calif., company that sells software enabling companies to allow workers to access their computers remotely.