As I sit watching the initial moments of The Scholar, I'm reminded of how infuriating our educational system is. They feed students with ideas of how they're going to "make a difference" in the world, and that somehow being a good student is going to equate to their life meaning something in the real world.

It's the greatest marketing ploy in the world.

And amazingly, so few of us are inclined to disillusion the students with a hefty dose of reality. We allow students to pursue majors equating to "underwater umbrella opening", regardless of the actual difficulty of the subject (say, Latin, or the like). It is often not until it is too late (last year of school, or worse, after graduation), that the students suddenly realize that they have to get a job, and that a degree alone will not guarantee it. Suddenly, the realization that their major has become a liability, not an asset.

So what relevance do the activities performed in "the scholar" really have to these students' chance of success in the real world? How, exactly, does a team trying to figure out how to reshape the image of a bull by moving only two sticks relate to anything other than their ability to solve puzzles? And who will really care that they solved the bull puzzle in the real world? No one.

I want to watch this, because it takes place on the campus of USC, my alma mater, but I'm feeling distracted by my anger at the utter disconnectedness from the real world academia suffers under.