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  1. #136

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    Metrolink should consider lowering fares to bring in new business

    Metrolink should consider lowering fares to bring in new business - LA Daily News

    The largest problem with public sector control of srvice-oriented commodities is that it usually enters markets where there is little of any direct competition by the same enterprise. So, in the case of electricity, education, transportation, etc...those managing a service such as Metrolink seem to enjoy hiking rates regularly, regardless of whether the economy is good or bad. They simply do not think that there will ever be any negative consequences.

    It would show a sage act of common sense to take the private sector's que by lower costs at times when they are losing customers. As the article pointed out, in difficult times Metrolink would be far better off investing in solid numbers of loyal customers thru reduced fares. I agree with you 150%, CA!
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  2. #137

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    When my aunt, who is legally blind, was working, she suggested that within LA City limits, Metrolink should have fares comparable to Metrorail. A METRO DAY PASS should allow people to board. It would instantly expand mobility, but those fares would be subsidized.

  3. #138

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    An extension of more than the Gold Line
    Sunday's opening of eight new Metro stations on a path from downtown to East L.A. lays down tracks toward an exciting future

    It would be tough to overstate the level of cynicism that exists in certain corners of the Los Angeles establishment about the future of mass transit in Southern California. For many power brokers and longtime observers of the political scene, disparaging the chances of the region ever putting together a comprehensive transit system is some combination of rhetorical tic and parlor game.

    In fact, the progress we've already made on a subway and light-rail network -- full of delays and misjudgments as it has been -- is remaking the physical and psychological terrain of Los Angeles in some profound ways. As more neighborhoods and landmarks are brought into transit's orbit, their relationship to the rest of the city and region shifts, giving us a powerful means of seeing the built environment with fresh eyes.

    From that point of view, the opening on Sunday of the eight new Metropolitan Transportation Authority stations that make up the Gold Line extension -- six above ground and two below, reaching south and then east from Union Station into Little Tokyo, Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles -- is among the most significant civic milestones the city has reached in several years.
    article continues at:
    An extension of more than the Gold Line -- latimes.com

  4. #139

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Wow, just watched a show on Travel channel that said in 1963 Alweg offered to build 80 miles of monorail in LA for free. Politics shut it down. (Standard Oil, and rubber companies) Oh what could have been.
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  5. #140

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    When my aunt, who is legally blind, was working, she suggested that within LA City limits, Metrolink should have fares comparable to Metrorail. A METRO DAY PASS should allow people to board. It would instantly expand mobility, but those fares would be subsidized.
    Nothing wrong with subsidization as long as it is temporary and cut off once a market such as that of Metrolink has stablized in terms of popularity and profitability. As lower rates mak sense during economic hard times, it would be wise to raise the rates to more of a competitive once the economy picks up and most people are once again fully empoyed...along with decent benefits.
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  6. #141

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by D Duck View Post
    Wow, just watched a show on Travel channel that said in 1963 Alweg offered to build 80 miles of monorail in LA for free. Politics shut it down. (Standard Oil, and rubber companies) Oh what could have been.
    You're darn tootin'. The politics of the day quashed monorail expansion plans in LA... as well as plans to extend monorail routed throughout the state. I remember being seriously let down as a kid when the monorail plans fell through, while gasoline prices continued to increase at an inflated rate.
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  7. #142

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    An extension of more than the Gold Line
    Sunday's opening of eight new Metro stations on a path from downtown to East L.A. lays down tracks toward an exciting future



    article continues at:
    An extension of more than the Gold Line -- latimes.com
    Very interesting article. Affordable and convenient mass transportion avenues (such as the Gold line subway) does bring people together, as well as make them more aware and appreciative of the cultural offerings, businesses, and even the quality of the streets.
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  8. #143

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    an interesting article on California High-Speed Rail.

    A Reality Check on High-Speed Rail for California; UC Berkeley College of Engineering

    looks like there is some dispute on the projected ridership numbers.

    I would be more interested if it was like the Chunnel Train and it had car carriers. roll on in San Francisco and roll off in Anaheim.

  9. #144

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort



    In a history-setting move, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority board voted Thursday to approve a $298 billion, 30-year plan to reduce traffic congestion and improve public transit in the "megalopolis of gridlock."

    The Long Range Transportation Plan -- which includes the most funding ever set aside for transportation projects in Los Angeles County -- includes a Westside subway extension, the San Fernando Valley's Orange Line busway and various Valley freeway improvements.

    The plan comes as the county expects to face unprecedented growth, with a current population of 10 million expected to grow by 3 million over the next three decades.

    "It was a historic vote," said Metro board member and county Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky. "It's the first time in the post-Measure R era that the MTA has approved a long-range transportation plan. The priorities have been set consistent with what people voted for 11 months ago."


    Villaraigosa urged members of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce to lobby the local congressional delegation to back the Subway to the Sea. Ultimately the approved plan included funding to extend the subway at least to Westwood, with the remaining portion to Santa Monica listed as a desired project, but one without funding for now.

    Fourteen members of the Southern California delegation this week sent a letter to the Metro board protesting the plans for the Westside subway, saying it should go for a number of other projects -- a view the mayor said is shortsighted.

    "Five different projects means we will get $5 million here, $5 million there," Villaraigosa said.

    The mayor wants to get an advance from the federal government to cover the $40 billion expected from Measure R over the next 30 years to allow subway construction to be completed in 10 years.

    During Thursday's hearing, Fred Ortega, press deputy to U.S. Rep. Judy Chu, D-El Monte, said the county is the nation's largest and most congested region, yet receives less federal funding for transit projects than other areas.
    MTA greenlights $298 billion plan - LA Daily News
    Last edited by CaliforniaAdventurer; 11-30-2009 at 10:17 AM.

  10. #145

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by gary94080 View Post
    an interesting article on California High-Speed Rail.

    A Reality Check on High-Speed Rail for California; UC Berkeley College of Engineering

    looks like there is some dispute on the projected ridership numbers.

    I would be more interested if it was like the Chunnel Train and it had car carriers. roll on in San Francisco and roll off in Anaheim.
    Thanks, Gary. Welcome aboard the Mass Transit thread.

    Despite big challenges, the state can ultimately benefit from high-speed rail, panelists said. Carlos Daganzo, the Robert Horonjeff Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, noted that subsidies will be required during the early days of HSR to build ridership; but he suggested that, as demand grows and ridership increases, costs for high-speed rail will decline, particularly compared with costs for road travel, which will increase with demand.

    Changes in alignment could help build ridership early, Madanat said. By switching the Northern California route from Pacheco Pass to Altamont, many more potential riders from fast-growing areas of Contra Costa and Alameda counties could be lured away from air travel.

    Although none would describe high-speed rail as a “silver bullet” to solve the state’s transportation woes, a bullet train could encourage cities to improve public transportation and create greater density. “It could instigate a positive feedback cycle that will provide more complete mobility for Californians in the future,” Daganzo added.

  11. #146

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by D Duck View Post
    Wow, just watched a show on Travel channel that said in 1963 Alweg offered to build 80 miles of monorail in LA for free. Politics shut it down. (Standard Oil, and rubber companies) Oh what could have been.
    It's sad that we're having to spend billions to recreate transit lines on existing MTA right of ways, which had trolleys running on them until the 60s.

  12. #147

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by gary94080 View Post
    an interesting article on California High-Speed Rail.

    A Reality Check on High-Speed Rail for California; UC Berkeley College of Engineering

    looks like there is some dispute on the projected ridership numbers.

    I would be more interested if it was like the Chunnel Train and it had car carriers. roll on in San Francisco and roll off in Anaheim.
    Glad that you found this article, gary. It has brings to light the fact that environmentalists will attempt to propogandize every industrial and transprtation issue. The bottom line here is that the environmentalists are worried that high speed rail will result in significantly fewer people opting to completely stop driving cars. This of course would result in less money generated from smog control regulations of tail pipe emissions... which translates into less crooked kickback money for them.

    Sure, the automotive industry, air travel industry and small towns will each do a degree of anti-rail complaint-driven lobbying. But, it's the extremist environmentalists that are the biggest opponents. This entire article is geared to create concern that high speed rail will result in more automotive polution. The valley will become just as subway/hs rail connected as Japan. The concern over polution emmited from auto commuting to train stations located at key junctures throughout California is a bunch of hooey!
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  13. #148

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Quote Originally Posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
    Thanks, Gary. Welcome aboard the Mass Transit thread.
    I offer my welcoming to the thread as well, Gary.

    CA. Great new article about th projection of high speed rail's ability to work out it's problems.
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  14. #149

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Changing California's car culture to a car-and-transit culture is a long journey, friends.

    Counties diverge on plan to widen the 405 Freeway
    Officials in L.A. County prefer to have focus transit dollars on rail projects. In Orange County, freeway and surface street improvements get top priority.

    Counties diverge on plan to widen the 405 Freeway -- latimes.com

  15. #150

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    Re: Mass Transit 2 the Disneyland Resort

    Which is the best way west for L.A.'s subway?

    Wilshire or West Hollywood? As a subway extension draws closer to reality, the debate over the route intensifies.


    The first leg of the Westside extension would spur west from the existing Purple Line along Wilshire Boulevard from Western Avenue to Fairfax Avenue. Wilshire is L.A.'s legendary roadway, lined with office towers, shops and restaurants. The route would go through the Miracle Mile shopping district and stop at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which has lobbied heavily for the line.

    From there, future phases would take the Purple Line through Beverly Hills, Century City and Westwood.

    That route, however, bypasses some key Westside shopping and business areas in Hollywood and West Hollywood, including Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the Beverly Center and the Pacific Design Center.

    The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is considering an extension route that would cover those areas, but it probably would not be built until after the Wilshire link is done.
    Which is the best way west for L.A.'s subway? -- latimes.com

    The MTA unveiled the West Hollywood extension to great enthusiasm from community groups. The leg would run as an extension from the Red Line in Hollywood through parts of Hollywood and West Hollywood and would connect with the proposed extension of the Purple Line near the intersection of Wilshire and La Cienega boulevards. The Purple Line would then go west along Wilshire to Westwood.

    The Purple Line extension to Westwood would generate an estimated 49,000 daily boardings at the new stations and a total of 76,000 new daily boardings throughout the system, according to early studies from the MTA that are being updated. Ridership would increase by 17,900 at new stations if the West Hollywood link is built, according to MTA numbers.

    That compares to an average of 78,955 weekday riders on the Long Beach-to-downtown L.A. Blue Line, 149,597 on the downtown-to-North Hollywood Red Line, 38,619 on the Norwalk-to-Redondo Beach Green Line and 22,476 on the downtown-to-Pasadena Gold Line, according to the most current ridership counts from the MTA.

    The dilemma is a familiar one for transportation planners, who have struggled to build light-rail routes to capture the most riders possible.
    Officials said it's possible that the West Hollywood route could be built after the Purple Line gets to Westwood -- if it ever gets that far. But then, it would probably compete for money with a plan to build the Purple Line extension through Santa Monica.

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