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  1. #16

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    Re: Song Of the South

    I'm the baby of the MC family, b/c I've been on for two years, but just turned 13 in Dec. I've been introduced to a lot of the classics. This one, though, I've never seen b/c of somebody along the line being an idiot about it. I wanna see it, but I've never seen it. So it would only make sense to break that stupid agreement and re-release Song of the South. For us Disney nerds.
    Jessie is AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    My fav part in 2 is:
    Buzz: clears throat)
    I just wanted to say you're a bright young woman with a beautiful "yarnful" of hair... er, "hairful" of yarn. It's...uh...woah. (clears throat) I must go!
    Jessie: Well, aren't you the sweetest space toy I ever met!
    Buster: (barking)
    Slinky: What's that? Bark, bark? Uh...this fellow says he needs to go out back for a little "private time"!
    Jessie: That critter needs help! (jumps on toy car) Yodle-ay-HEEE-HOOO!!!!!
    Buzz: (wings suddenly pop open)

    Also, my fav part in 3 is:
    Jessie: turns on Spanish music)
    Buzz: involenterily starts dancing) I...I don't know what came over me!
    Jessie: goo-goo eyes) Just go with it, Buzz!
    (Then, they start doing the Paso Doble to a Spanish version of "You've Got a Friend in Me". Towards the end of the dance, Woody tosses Jessie a rose to catch in her mouth. It's awesome.)







    Go to the EBHO threads!!! They need YOU!

  2. #17

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy IlikeJessie3,

    Well now, here's a little known secret...and I wantcha to keep it just tween you and me mind you...if you were to head on over to youtube and type in Song of the South I think you might just be pleasantly
    surprised...yessir...you can watch the whole movie right here on this computer gizmo! Keep lookin' till you find the whole thing on one video...then, set back, relax and prepare to have a Zip a dee do dah day for sure!

    You know, as you might suspect I'm a fan of Jessie the Yodelin' Cowgirl too. And, ya might be surprised to know that if ya wandered over to Fort Worth, Texas and visited the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame...Jessie is in there! Yep, they recognized her for her wonderful cowgirl spirit. YEEEEEEHAH!

    Course I'm a fan of Woody too. Can't figure out why Jessie kinda took a hankerin' for Buzz Lightyear...
    but...life is like that I suppose.

    Enjoy Song of the South and report back to us here to tell us what ya thought... Everybody's gotta laughin' place ya know...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

    ---------- Post added 04-11-2012 at 12:03 PM ----------

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, like I said, I was kinda frustrated by Miss Sally, Johnny's Mom...and there was just somethin' about Mr. John's eyes that bothered me too. Mr. John, as you recall was Johnny's Dad.

    Now, having lived most of my life way up north in places like Michigan and Ohio and North Dakota and Minnesota, when I moved down here to N'Olins I was kinda surprised I guess when folks started callin' me
    "Mr. Dan"...it's just one of those delightful things about the south I guess...and I've kinda got used to it now...

    Anyways, near as I can tell, Mr. John wrote for the newspapers in Atlanta and...uh...folks seemed to be a little upset at what he was writin'. So...he decided to take Johnny to stay with Miss. Sally's Mom...Johnny's Grandmother...out at the plantation 'till things cooled down some. He wanted Miss Sally to return with him to Atlanta...but Miss Sally had other ideas...

    So...Mr. John got back in the buggy, left his family, and went back to Atlanta alone...because, he thought, "I have to."

    Now, seems Walt Disney was often tryin' to tell us things about the importance of family. Later, of course, in Mary Poppins he got a little more direct about it.

    As parents, well, we know that our work, what we do for a living, can get in the way of what's really important in life. Our jobs often demand our time and that means our jobs often pull us away from our families...the ones we love.

    And, I believe that's the conflict Mr. John was facin' here. So...away he went. I don't think he truly wanted to...but he felt he had to.

    You know...the older we grow, the more we realize that it is the ones we love...our families...that are truly most important. Still, we sometimes find ourselves in a trap. In order to have money we need to work and our work demands our time.

    It can't be avoided I suppose, unless we win the lottery or something. But when our job becomes our life...when we become a "work-a-holic" as they say...well that's when we've got some hard lessons to learn...like the Dad in Mary Poppins. Turns out it may be more important to mend that kite and take the family out to fly it...

    Walt knew the importance of the family...many of the stories he told us were about that. Here's what he had to say on the subject: "The important thing is the family. If you can keep the family together-
    and that is the backbone of our whole business, catering to families-that's what we hope to do."

    So...in Song of the South...Johnny's Grandmother and Uncle Remus sorta teamed up to do that...

    It's a story about love and kindness...about wisdom...about little puppy dogs and frog huntin'. Those tales of ol' Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear were not just funny stories...they were lessons...lessons on how to live life...simple truths... Stories that gave Johnny strength to face life's challenges...and to do it with a smile.

    Havin' joy in your heart...the ability to recognize one of them days when you can't open your mouth without a song jumpin' right out of it...or the fact that "Everybody has a laughin' place" although it might take ya a while to figure out where it is... all these things packed a powerful lot of wisdom. That's why I love and respect Uncle Remus and this wonderful Walt Disney film...that's truly the "hidden" meaning folks should find in it. And that sorta thing surely shouldn't be kept under lock and key in some vault somewheres... Nope. It sure shouldn't...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-11-2012 at 09:19 AM.

  3. #18

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, let's talk a little about the great actor who portrayed Uncle Remus. His name was James Baskett.
    He was born on February 16th, 1904 and, believe it or not, he was only 42 years old when Song of the South was released in 1946.

    Now...the truly tragic thing is that James Baskett died on July 9th, 1948...he was just 44 years old.
    He died of heart disease.

    But, it was back in 1945 that he auditioned at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank...just for a small part as one of the animated character voices in Song of the South. So...he went to the studio and it just so happened that Walt Disney was there and, to put it mildly, he was impressed...very impressed with the talent he saw in Mr. Baskett. So much so, in fact that he hired him right then and there, on the spot, for the lead role as Uncle Remus.

    Did you know that he was the voice of Brer Fox too? He was. And he even filled in as Brer Rabbit in one of those wonderful animated sequences as well.

    What did folks think of Mr. Baskett's performance as Uncle Remus back then? Well...on March 20th, 1948 they presented him with an Honorary Academy Award for his performance. He became the very first black man in the history of cinema to win an Oscar. It seems times were changin'...and James
    Baskett's outstanding performance made Hollywood history...

    The warm portrayal of Uncle Remus is the wonderful legacy of a man who left us all too soon.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  4. #19

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Linus View Post
    I'm a big fan of Song of the South, the animated parts more than the live action sequences.

    Even though the film was not released on DVD in the U.S., many members of my family own a copy just because my Great Great Uncle on my mother's side was Allie Wrubel. He wrote the music to "Zip a Dee Doo Dah, which he won an Oscar for.
    Howdy Linus,

    Well your Great, Great Uncle on your mother's side sure left the world a wonderful legacy. Yep, he surely did. 'Twas back on March 20th, 1948 that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences handed your Great, Great Uncle Allie Wrubel and another feller named Ray Gilbert the Academy Award for Best Song at the 20th Academy Awards Ceremony....

    The film, of course, was just plumb full of wonderful songs...

    THAT'S WHAT UNCLE REMUS SAID
    EVERYBODY'S GOT A LAUGHIN' PLACE
    HOW DO YOU DO?
    LET THE RAIN POUR DOWN
    SONG OF THE SOUTH
    ALL I WANT
    SOONER OR LATER
    WHO WANTS TO LIVE LIKE THAT?
    and the Best Song of all ZIP A DEE DO DAH!

    Of course, James Basket, got his special Academy Award that year too. And, looking back, the whole cast put in some memorable performances...

    Let's take a look at 'em...

    The Bullies...Ginny's older brothers...let's see Jake Favors was played by George Nokes, and Joe Favors was played by Gene Holland.

    Their Maw, Mrs. Favors, the lady who was gonna "whip the tar out of 'em" was played by Mary Field. Ginny's father, who she was so happy to see had come home, was played by Olivier Urbain.

    Aunt Tempy was played by the one and only Hattie McDaniel of course...who looked like she was a mighty good hand at makin' mouthwaterin' pies in that kitchen...

    Miss Sally, Johnny's Mom, was played by Ruth Warrick...and Mr. John was played by Erik Rolf.

    Johnny's guide to the wonders of grandfather clocks and frog huntin', the spirited Toby, was played by Glenn Leedy.

    Then the little girl who was "pleased to meet ya"...Ginny was played by Luana Patten...and Johnny was played by Bobby Driscoll. Now, as most Disney fans know, Bobby went on to be the voice of Peter Pan and he starred as Jim Hawkins in Treasure Island.

    The kind, wise, and wonderful grandmother was played by Lucile Watson. And the maid was played by Anita Brown.

    And, those wonderful voices for the animated segments? Well...let's see...a feller named Johnny Lee was the voice of Brer Rabbit, Uncle Remus himself, James Baskett, was the voice of Brer Fox, Nick Stewart was the slow but lovable Brer Bear, and twas Roy Glenn as Brer Frog.

    All these folks together made for one mighty satisfactual movie...a movie worth celebratin'... Then, of course, there were all those folks "Behind the scenes"...the animators and storyboard people...the producers and directors and things.

    Let's hope that the folks at Disney soon figure out that Song of the South was a film they should be celebratin'...not hidin' away in some dark, cold vault under lock and key. far, far away. Let's hope they bring it out, dust it off, and release it all shiny and new, on Blu-Ray, for Disney Fans all over the whole wide world...includin' the whole United States of Georgia...as Toby would say...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-12-2012 at 10:49 AM.

  5. #20

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    Song of the South



    Howdy Pards,

    Well, it seems those stories are as old as the hills...yessir, they surely are, and we may have a feller named Uncle Bob Capers, among others, to thank for passin' 'em along.

    Uncle Bob Capers was a slave on the Turnwold Plantation in Georgia...and he was a storyteller...yep, much like Uncle Remus himself. And, there was a little white boy who was listenin' to'um, too. That boy's name was not Johnny but Joel...yep...Joel Chandler Harris to be exact. He was born way back in 1848 and he loved those fabulous stories he heard from Uncle Bob Capers and other black friends at Turnwold. It was 32 years later, in the year 1880 that Harris published a book, his first book, titled "Uncle Remus: His Songs and Sayings." Well that book was a success...so...to make a long story short, Joel Chandler Harris published many more "Uncle Remus" books and even created the Uncle Remus Magazine... Joel Chandler Harris died in the year 1908.

    Now...Uncle Bob Capers didn't invent those stories, of course...no they, for the most part, were much, much older than he was...passed down from generation to generation of storytellers...



    But Joel Chandler Harris spent purty much his whole life preservin' those stories he had heard in his childhood...exactly as he had heard them in that ol' dialect long, long ago...

    Now Walt Disney said that he was first introduced to those stories as a boy on the farm in Marceline, Missouri...and he loved 'em too.

    After the Three Caballeros came out in 1941...mixing live actors and animated characters...Walt felt he finally had the technology he needed to bring those Uncle Remus stories to life up there on the big screen. And, that's when work began on Song of the South...

    The film was released in 1946. And, interestingly, James Baskett, the man who gave that wonderful Oscar winning performance as Uncle Remus passed away in 1948...roughly 100 years after the man who wrote down the tales of Uncle Remus had been born.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-28-2012 at 09:29 AM.

  6. #21

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,



    Well, now, when Johnny first arrived out there on the plantation the first friend he met up with, thanks to his Grandma, Miss Doshy, was Toby. And a spirited friend he was too...the first thing he did was introduce Johnny to the wonders of that Grandfather Clock...then, the joy of frog huntin'... and ridin' stick horses to get down the trail faster. Course, he also warned Johnny not to cut through that pasture cause that mean ol' bull was in there... they became close friends.

    It seems that there were a number of wonderful black folks in Johnny's life...like Aunt Tempe. Remember how her face lit up when she was tellin' Johnny about Uncle Remus and his wonderful stories?
    Remember Johnny askin', "Aunt Tempe, is Uncle Remus real?" Remember her answer?

    Then, of course, there was Uncle Remus himself...kind, gentle, wise, and caring...and downright fun to be around. Towards the end of the film Johnny realized that his "Laughin' Place" was really Uncle Remus's
    cabin...listenin' to those wonderful stories 'bout Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox and Brer Bear...

    Now, given all this...it's downright hard to understand how some folks imagine this film to be racist. It isn't. If anything it celebrates warmth and wisdom and kindness...and friendship.

    Now...some say it's the way blacks were portrayed...on a plantation in the South after the Civil War.
    Well, History happened...it doesn't make a whole lotta sense to deny it. And, portraying black people as hard working people of faith and warmth and kindness and wisdom...well, to my way of thinkin' there just ain't nuthin' wrong with that...nuthin' whatsoever.

    And this business of being happy in spite of the challenges of life...well, again, to my way of thinkin' there's a whole lotta wisdom in that too.

    So...all these rumors about how bad Song of the South is...rumors that have grown over these years of keepin' Song of the South under lock and key...well, they are just ugly rumors. That's what they are.
    The truth is this film is wonderful...there isn't a racist moment in the whole thing...

    I look up to Uncle Remus...respect his wisdom about life. I look up to Aunt Tempe...whose kindness and joy in tellin' Johnny about the magic to be found on the plantation...and whose talent in the kitchen makin' those pies...I respect and admire. And I look up to Toby...who had the wisdom to see the wonders of life...those magical chimes of the grandfather clock, the fun of frog huntin', and ridin' stick horses to get places faster...and who saw the magic in Uncle Remus...who told the best stories in the whole United States of Georgia. And I look up to those people of faith and hope and joy and family who sang songs to express those feelin's...



    Walt Disney, a storyteller from way back, saw the magic in all that...and he celebrated it...in Song of the South. This warm, joy filled story should be released once again for all the world to enjoy. And when it is, all those ugly rumors will simply fall away in the face of the truth...when it is, well, everything will truly be satisfactual. Oh, some people will still read things into it that ain't there...but they do that with just about everything anyways...and just cause they do...well, that don't mean the rest of us should be denied the warmth, the joy, the wonder, the magic, the wisdom that truly is Song of the South.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-28-2012 at 09:34 AM.

  7. #22

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    "OH, I KNOWS -- I KNOWS. I'M JES'
    A WO' OUT OL' MAN WHAT DON'T DO
    NUTHIN' BUT TELL STORIES. BUT DEY
    AIN'T NEVER DONE NO HARM TO
    NOBODY. AN' IF DEY DON'T DO NO
    GOOD, HOW COME DEY LAS' SO LONG?"

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  8. #23

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, we talked a little bit about Uncle Bob Capers...another friend of Joel Chandler Harris was "Uncle" George Terrell. Yep, he was another one of those wonderful old, wise, black storytellers, just like Uncle Remus.

    So...before the war Putnam County Georgia was "a land of cotton, large plantations, slave-holders, wealth and plenty." But, Joel Chandler Harris wasn't born rich...no...the truth is, he was born in "utter poverty" in 1848.

    As a boy, they say, that Joel liked to hang out at the Eatonton, Georgia Post Office a lot. It seems the man in charge of the Post Office would always be findin' some discarded magazine or newspaper to give Joel...and he loved 'em. Well, one day he spotted an ad for a "printer's devil" in the very first issue of a newspaper called "The Countryman". Now this newspaper was published at the Turnwold plantation...nearby.

    Young Joel Chandler Harris, at the age of 13, applied for the job and was hired. It was there, at Turnwold plantation that Joel began his writing career and it was there that his lifelong friendship with the plantation black folks...including Uncle George Terrell and Uncle Bob Capers...began.

    Well...the war, of course, happened and in 1864 it came to Turnwold...

    Joel Chandler Harris worked for newspapers in New Orleans, Macon, Forsyth, Savannah, and the Atlanta Constitution...and it was there at the Atlanta Constitution that he met a man named Captain Evan P. Howell. Under his guidance Harris began putting some of his memories of those wonderful stories into the newspaper. Soon, newspapers way up North began printing those stories too and soon Joel Chandler Harris and his stories of Uncle Remus, Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, Brer Bear and other critters became famous.

    He joined with others to help rebuild Atlanta and the South during reconstruction...but he never forgot the warmth, and wisdom, and friendship, and the stories he had heard from his old, black friends on the plantation. Yep, twas Joel Chandler Harris who first introduced us to those wonderful tales of Uncle Remus. And, when Walt Disney came along...well...let's just say that he recognized a good storyteller when he saw one...or read one...and so he decided to revisit that rockin' chair by the ol' cabin fireplace...and he introduced his story this way...

    "Out of the humble cabin, out of the singing heart of the Old South come the tales of Uncle Remus, rich in simple truths, forever fresh and new."

    Let's hope that one day soon the folks at Disney understand that they are hidin' a mighty wonderful thing away in those secret vaults of theirs ...and let's hope they decide, one day real soon, to set it free...and to celebrate it for what it truly is...a celebration of the warmth, kindness, wisdom and joy found in some old, old tales from long, long ago...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  9. #24

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Ever wonder what Leonard Maltin had to say about Song of the South? Well, here's a little of what he had to say...

    "...Song of the South can speak for itself. Accusations of Uncle Tomisms and quibbles over it's syrupy storyline are ultimately defeated by the film's sheer entertainment value. It has some of the most delightful moments Disney ever captured on film...and that's what really counts."

    Well, now, I couldn't agree more...it does indeed have "some of the most delightful moments Disney ever captured on film". Reason enough to release it once again for all the world to see and enjoy.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  10. #25

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, for those of you who haven't seen this film yet...get ready, right now, to experience something downright wonderful. Yep, get your ears tuned for listenin'...get ready for a Zip-a-dee-do-dah day for sure. You see, I'm gonna let you in on a little secret that will allow you to watch the film right now, this very minute. Where? Well, I reckon you could say it's over thar at my "laughin' place..."

    So...would you like to visit my laughin' place? A place where you can watch Song of the South anytime your heart desires for free?

    You would. Well...O.K. then...here's whatcha do...

    Head on over to YouTube...and type in SONG OF THE SOUTH. Scroll down till you see the whole thing on video (One hour, thirty four minutes, and thirty five seconds), push the button...then set back, relax, and get ready to watch a film you are gonna find "mighty satisfactual"...yesssir..."mighty satisfactual".

    Now, some of us have been lucky enough to find SONG OF THE SOUTH both on VHS and on DVD...I have two on VHS and three on DVD... But, that don't mean that Disney shouldn't release the thing officially here in the good ol' U.S.A.. Yep, they had oughta dust it off and put it on Blu-ray with all the other classics... And, maybe re-release it in theaters too. Will some folks complain? Of course they will...they complain about just about everything anyways...but, I believe, if most folks actually watch the film, they will see it for what it truly is...a story that celebrates the folklore of our country, a story that
    celebrates storytelling, and a story that celebrates wisdom, and kindness, and joy, and faith, and love...
    The truth is, blacks are portrayed as some mighty fine folks in this film...wish I could say the same for those Favor boys...

    But, well, my gosh, what are you waitin' fer...head on over to that laughin' place I told ya about and see for yerself. Then, report back here when you're done and tell me what ya thought...

    In the film Johnny discovers that his "laughin' place" is Uncle Remus's cabin and that rockin' chair by the fire...listenin' to Uncle Remus tell those stories...reckon that's my laughin' place too. Well, what are ya waitin' fer...head on over thar...you'll see. Enjoy.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  11. #26

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, you younguns know it, of course, as "Splash Mountain" but it's real name is Ol' Chickapin Hill. Yep that's where ol' Brer Fox's cave is said to be...

    Now, along with many of you, I've been up there...ready to be thrown smack dab in the middle of that Briar Patch. Course, it's a funny thing, that, just like Brer Rabbit hisself, when you do actually get "thrown in"...well you wind up just about as happy as you could possibly be! You hear ol' Brer Rabbit singin' that he was "Born and Bred in a Briar Patch!"

    Listenin' to those tales of Uncle Remus...those tales of Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox and Brer Bear...well things often end up that way. Yep, you wind up fealing a whole lot happier, and a little wiser perhaps, than you were when those tales began... Almost like Uncle Remus planned it that way or somethin'...

    I reckon I see Song of the South as a story with a lotta heart. I've always found it kinda hard not to like little puppy dogs like "Teenshe"...or goin' frog huntin'...and such. And, the bad guys in this picture...those Favor boys...well it was kinda fun watchin' their Maw give'em what they had comin'...

    And it was kinda fun watchin' the wisdom of Ol' Uncle Remus at work...

    The whole experience was like meetin' up with some wonderful new friends in a downright beautiful place...and startin' to feel right at home there...

    Now, I may live down N'Olins way now, but I spent most of my life way up North...way, way up North...and with snow sometimes level with the top of our car...it was kinda nice thinkin' about cottonwoods in blossum over the cabin door. And, I've always had a particular fondness for those rockin' chairs next to the fireplace...and stories bein' told...

    Kinda like those buttered sweet potatoes too...and I ain't never turned down no apple pie...you know the kind Aunt Tempe was makin'...

    I reckon that the point is, there's some wonderful stuff to be found in Song of the South...if ya got yur
    ears tuned for listenin', and your eyes tuned for watchin', and your heart tuned for understandin'...

    Most all the nonsense...you know...the rumors about Song of the South are just that...nonsense. Some folks seein' wrong where there ain't no wrong. Some folks tryin' to deny that history ever happened. Some folks sayin' that black people have never tried to be happy in their whole lives...in spite of the challenges they faced. Well, the black people in Song of the South, in the reconstruction years after the Civil war were hard working people...people of faith...people who knew the importance of family,
    people who celebrated the simple delights of life, people who are to be looked up to, and respected.

    Joel Chandler Harris saw that...he lived it...he saw the beauty, the wonder, the wisdom, and the magic in those old tales he had heard from the folks he considered his friends...and he set out to preserve them for future generations...

    Walt Disney saw the beauty, the wonder, the wisdom and the magic in those tales too. That's why he made a film about them. That film desired to do nothing more than introduce us to a piece of American folklore that should be preserved and shared with generation after generation for all time...



    "Out of the humble cabin, out of the singing heart of the Old South have come the tales of Uncle Remus, rich in simple truths, forever fresh and new."

    So, let's hope this feller in the fancy business suit settin' behind that desk in Burbank, gets a little courage...a little wisdom...and let's hope he finally decides to do what is right... release Song of the South once again for the whole world to enjoy...put it on Blu-ray with all the other Disney Classics...and stop thinkin' about bein' "politically correct". Taint nuthin' wrong with Song of the South...and, anyways, don't you know? "You can't run away from trouble. There ain't no place that far."

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-27-2012 at 03:40 PM.

  12. #27

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Ever been frustrated by a critic? Sometimes these fellers can see the exact same film that you did and think exactly the opposite you do about the thing.

    Now, I've kinda found that its impossible for some of them to look at a thing without bringin' who they are into the mix...in other words, their comments are as much about them and their upbringing as they are about the film itself.

    Their comments are shaped by things that truly have nothing to do with the film...they see things that truly aren't there. They read things into the story...they make things up...stir things up...based on their own political leanings...

    And some of 'em just delight in usin' the biggest words they can look up...to give the impression that they are highly educated, knowledgable, and that their opinions are beyond question...beyond reproach...

    Some of these fellers have attacked Song of the South over the years...yep, they've delighted in reading all sorts of evil things into it. And they say that any thinking person should be "offended" by it.

    Well, of course, all that is just simple nonsense...but that is what that feller in the business suit over at the Walt Disney Studios is so afraid of...he thinks it wouldn't be "politically correct" to release Song of the South...because some might be "offended" by it... Pay no attention to the fact others, those of us who see and understand what the film is truly all about, are offended by the fact that it is being kept under lock and key... I guess our opinion doesn't count.

    The truth is...there is nothing offensive about Song of the South...absolutely nothing. It represents
    black people the way black people were in the years following the Civil War. Hard working people of faith and wisdom...and hope. Uncle Remus is a wise, kind, wonderful storyteller...famous for those tales of simple wisdom and truth. It is those wonderful things, those positive things that Walt Disney was celebrating in this joy filled film...

    There are those who say that Hattie McDaniel was a stereotype of black women. Well, 'scuze me, but
    bein' called Aunt Tempe and obviously loved by Johnny...is hardly a negative image. Makin' delicious pies is hardly a crime either. What I saw was a skilled, confident, caring character...portrayed by a skilled, talented, confident and caring actress. Hattie McDaniel was an Oscar winning actress...a person I sure would be proud to know...just as much as I'd be proud to know our First Lady...

    Don't believe the negative rumors about this film...don't read negative things into it. Look for the positive things...the inspiring things...the joyous things Walt Disney was celebrating. And, above all watch the film and decide for yourself...don't let the critics influence your opinion one way or the other.



    We can all learn, I believe, from the Tales of Uncle Remus...and the Walt Disney Company would be helping us learn these lessons by having the courage to do the right thing...re-release a true Walt Disney Classic for all the world to once again see and enjoy.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-28-2012 at 09:39 AM.

  13. #28

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    "YES SUH... DEY'S UDDER WAYS O' LEARNIN' 'BOUT DE BEHIND FEET OF A MULE DEN GETTIN' KICKED BY 'EM. SURE AS I'M NAMED REMUS.

    AN' JES' CAUSE DESE YER TALES IS 'BOUT CRITTERS LIKE BRER RABBIT AN' BRER FOX, DAT DON' MEAN DEY AIN'T DE SAME LIKE KIN HAPPEN TO FOLKS,

    SO DEM WHAT CAN'T LEARN FROM A TALE 'BOUT CRITTERS, JES' AIN'T GOT DEY EARS TUNED FOR LIS'NIN."


    To my way of thinkin' Uncle Remus' words carry a whole lotta weight...to truly understand Song of the South you have to have your ears tuned for listenin', your eyes tuned for watchin', and your heart tuned for understandin'...



    Way back when Joel Chandler Harris first started thinking about publishing those tales he had known and loved, he figured that to catch the full magic of it all, they had to be told exactly as he had heard them...in that wonderful old dialect that gave the stories their magic. That was an important part of the lessons to be learned after all...that wisdom, love, understanding, kindness, all these simple truths had been passed in exactly this way from one generation to the next...

    Walt Disney, being a storyteller himself, saw and understood that too and he set out to celebrate it in this movie. The heritage, the legacy of a people...can be found in these tales... Disney wasn't celebrating anything negative here...he was passing on the joy, the wisdom, the love found in these stories... He was celebrating the art of the storyteller... He was celebrating the power of kindness and friendship and caring... and he was celebrating a way of living life...with joy in your heart no matter what challenges you may face.

    Once you understand where Walt Disney's heart was in releasing this film, you begin to understand that there ain't nuthin' negative in it...nuthin' whatsoever.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 05-03-2012 at 10:44 AM.

  14. #29

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    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Johnny: "I WISH I HAD A LAUGHIN' PLACE."
    Ginny: "ME TOO."
    Uncle Remus: "WHAT MAKES YOU THINK YOU AIN'T?
    CO'SE YOU GOT A LAUGHIN' PLACE."
    Johnny: "REALLY, UNCLE REMUS?"
    Ginny: "REALLY?"
    Remus: "EV'YBODY'S GOT ONE! THE TROUBLE
    IS, MOS' FOLKS WON'T TAKE TIME
    TO GO LOOK FOR IT."
    Johnny &
    Ginny: "WHERE'S MINE?"
    Remus: "WELL NOW, DAT I CAN'T 'ZACKLY
    SAY...'CAUSE WHERE 'TIS FOR ONE,
    MIGHTN'T BE WHERE 'TIS FOR
    ANOTHER."
    Johnny: "COME ON GINNY! LET'S START LOOKIN'."



    It has been said that Song of the South is "A refreshing tale of friendship transcending race, gender, class, and age." I believe that pretty much sums it up...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 05-03-2012 at 10:45 AM.

  15. #30

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    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, along with lifting our voices for the re-release of Song of the South in theaters and eventually on Blu-ray...the time has come...no...it's long, long overdue...for something else to happen.
    Yessir, I believe it's time...long past time... to recognize James Baskett as a Disney Legend.

    The song Zip a dee do dah would be reason enough of course, but the warm and wonderful portrayal of Uncle Remus, a performance that won him an Academy Award, has truly qualified this wonderful actor for Disney Legend status.

    Oh...now...wait a minute here...it turns out that James Baskett received this honor in the year 2010.
    Some sites on Google say he did anyway...and some, like the official Disney site, make no mention of Mr. Baskett whatsoever...so, what 'xactly is the truth? Did Mr. Basket get this richly deserved recognition...or didn't he?
    "The Disney Legends award has three distinct elements that characterize the contributions made by each talented recipient.

    The Spiral ... stands for imagination, the power of an idea.

    The Hand ... holds the gifts of skill, discipline and craftsmanship.

    The Wand and the Star ... represent magic: the spark that is ignited when imagination and skill combine to create a new dream."

    So...I wonder... do you know if Mr. Baskett has received this honor for his contributions to Disney History?

    Established in 1987, the Disney Legends program recognizes people who have made an extraordinary and integral contribution to The Walt Disney Company... Again, some sites on Google say that Mr. Basket was recognized...and some say there were no awards whatsoever in 2010. Anybody know the truth?

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-17-2012 at 09:56 PM.

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