Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 113
  1. #46

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Kei View Post
    I think it's mainly the tar baby joke that keeps it unreleased. It's an unadulterated racial epitaph. Should it still be released? Yes. Should white people talk about the movie as portraying black people in positive terms to make them feel better about Disney? No.
    Howdy Pards,

    Well, first, I think people of any color, any race, should be allowed to talk about the movie...and if they believe it portrays black people in positive terms...well...I agree with them. Yep. I surely do.

    The story of the tar baby...well you can read things into it that just aren't there, and a lotta folks have. What is it really? Well, it's a story with a lesson...Uncle Remus' words about Brer Rabbit:

    "POOR LI'L CRITTER -- HE LEARNED A POW'FUL LESSON, BUT HE LEARNED IT TOO LATE -- BUT IT JES'
    GOES TO SHOW YOU WHAT COMES O' MIXIN' UP WID SOMETHIN' YOU GOT NO BUSINESS WID IN DE FUST PLACE ...AN' DON'T YOU NEVER FORGET IT!"

    That's what the story is about...not some imagined racial slur... "In modern usage, "tar baby" refers to any "sticky situation" that is only aggravated by additional contact."

    "An article in The New Republic argued that people are "unaware that some consider it to have a second meaning as a slur" and it "is an obscure slur, not even known to be so by a substantial proportion of the population." It continued that, "those who feel that tar baby's status as a slur is patently obvious are judging from the fact that it sounds like a racial slur" (italics in original text). In other countries, the phrase continues to refer to problems of an intractable nature worsened by intervention."

    In short, don't read racism into somethin' that really ain't got no racism in it... Just because tar is black...that don't mean that somebody is making a racial slur. This is a story about "what comes of mixin' up with something you got no business with in the first place." just like Uncle Remus said it was in the first place...and nothing more.

    Incidently, though, the story of the tar baby, a segment taken directly from Song of the South, has been released by Disney on video...so...that ain't it...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-22-2012 at 09:25 AM.

  2. #47

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    568

    Re: Song of the South

    Alas Uncle Bob doesn't want the Song of the South released and his decision is the only one that matters. A number film critics and historians agree with him.

    Iger's 2011 response:

    I said last year at our shareholder’s meeting that I had watched Song of the South again and, even though we’ve considered from time to time bringing it back, I didn’t think it was the right thing for the company to do. It was made in a different time. Admittedly you could use that as context, but I just felt that there are elements to the film, while it was a relatively good film, that wouldn’t necessarily sit right or feel right to a number of people today. And, just felt that it wouldn’t be in the best interest of our shareholders to bring it back, even though there would be some financial gain. Sometimes you make sacrifices on the financial side to do what you believe is right and that’s an example of that.

    I just don’t feel that it’s right for us to use company resources to make it available, whether it’s wide or whether it’s narrow… narrowly available. It’s a strong belief that I have— consulted with other top executives of the company. They all agreed, and I think, just remember it as it was, and don’t expect to see it again for… at least for awhile, if ever.
    Writing about all things Disney, a couple of paragraphs at a time

    http://disneylandtraveler.blogspot.com/

    75,000+ page views and counting.

  3. #48

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, now, ya know Walt Disney loved the folklore of America…and this here country of ours has plenty of it to be sure…

    “Pecos Bill was quite a cowboy down in Texas, a Western superman to say the least…”

    Then there was Paul Bunyan and his big Blue Ox way up thar in Minnesoty, Maine, and all over the north country...

    Johnny Appleseed…remember him?

    Then, of course, The King of the Wild Frontier, Davy Crockett, who traveled from real historic hero into legend.

    And, along the mighty Mississippi there was Mike Fink, King of the River, and Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer…

    There was John Henry, a rail drivin' man...


    Down here in the South, there was a wonderful storyteller named Uncle Remus who introduced us to critters like Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear.

    Walt just couldn’t help lovin’ all these legends…ya see he was a storyteller himself…and a mighty fine one at that. Twas mor’n 45 years ago now that Walt left us. So, I spose it’s only natural that some folks around today ain’t got no idea what things were like back nearly a half century ago… They wonder, I suppose, why so many of these old timers talk about him with such warm, happy memories…

    Times have changed…

    But, let me tell ya, those of us who were around back in those times when Walt was still around are never gonna forget him. He was like a kind ol’ uncle who came to our homes once a week with an exciting new idea, new story, or new adventure. Folks often referred to him as Uncle Walt…and many still do.



    There was just somethin’ downright wonderful about him…yessir, downright wonderful. Seems he was always dreamin’ up ways to make other folks happy…and he spent his whole life doin’ that…

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol’ Dan

    ---------- Post added 04-22-2012 at 02:42 PM ----------

    Howdy Pards,

    Well, a former CEO of the Walt Disney Company, in fact one of the founders of that company, once said this about Song of the South...

    "Out of the past of every nation has come its folklore: Simple tales handed down from generation to generation and made immortal by such names as Aesop, The Brothers Grimm, and Hans Christian Anderson.

    But no folk tales are better loved than Joel Chandler Harris's "Uncle Remus" -- stories in which the Southern Negroes brought the warmth of their humble firesides into the hearts of people everywhere.

    And if, now, in "Song of the South" we have succeeded in a measure to help perpetuate a priceless literary treasure -- my co-workers and I shall, indeed, be very happy."



    Who was the CEO who said that? Well, it was a feller named Walt Disney.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-28-2012 at 09:54 AM.

  4. #49

    • Closed Account
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    18

    Re: Song of the South

    Iger is being a tool on this one. It should be persevered for the historical record and made available narrowly to people interested in seeing it. Most of the people that want to see it are African American btw.

    and it "is an obscure slur, not even known to be so by a substantial proportion of the population."
    It is absolutely not obscure. I knew what that word meant as a child and I had never seen this film.

    Denying the racism in old cartoons is something that should have gotten over with when Bakshi parodied Brer Rabbit and everything else in his movie, Coonskin. Kind of denying it now I don't think is the best way to deal with this. Yes, people should still be entitled to watch it though. A free society doesn't choose to hide art because its controversial.

  5. #50

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Kei View Post
    Iger is being a tool on this one. It should be persevered for the historical record and made available narrowly to people interested in seeing it. Most of the people that want to see it are African American btw.

    It is absolutely not obscure. I knew what that word meant as a child and I had never seen this film.

    Denying the racism in old cartoons is something that should have gotten over with when Bakshi parodied Brer Rabbit and everything else in his movie, Coonskin. Kind of denying it now I don't think is the best way to deal with this. Yes, people should still be entitled to watch it though. A free society doesn't choose to hide art because its controversial.
    Howdy Kei,

    Well, let's see, first of all, anyone can see this film who wants to see it...right now. All they have to do is go over to youtube and watch it in it's entirety.

    Second the story of the Tar Bady did not originate with Walt Disney's Song of the South...it wasn't created specifically for this movie...no...turns out that Mark Twain often told that tale as he traveled around the country (back in the 1880s)...he got it from someone he knew and admired, Joel Chandler Harris, who got it from folks he knew and admired...

    Joel Chandler Harris was not a racist...he fought nearly all his adult life for "racial reconciliation". There's a difference. A big difference. His Uncle Remus stories came from black friends he knew on the Turnwold Plantation down in Georgia. He celebrated those stories and retold them as closely as he could in the old dialect just as he had heard them. Mark Twain loved 'em. President Theodore Roosevelt loved 'em. America loved 'em. When Walt Disney was a boy in Marceline, Missouri in the early 1900's he was introduced to them...and he loved 'em. I don't believe Joel Chandler Harris, Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, or Walt Disney were racists...

    Now...that's not to say that there were no racists around...there were...and, unfortunately, are. They found particular delight in twisting things to their own "political agendas" you might say. And there were, indeed, racists who made cartoons like Coonskin.

    Evil exists in this old world of ours...there is no denying that. But Song of the South was designed to celebrate Uncle Remus...and those tales of wisdom, warmth, caring...and love...that came directly from the black folks, Mr. Harris's friends, on Turnwold Plantation...there were no hidden messages in Song of the South...no racism...that's not what Walt Disney... or any of those other fellers (Harris, Twain, and Roosevelt) were all about.

    Most folks who read those tales...saw the wisdom, the simple truths, the magic in them...and they celebrated Uncle Remus exactly as Joel Chandler Harris intended. He wanted them to see the same wisdom, the same love, the same magic that he did.

    Now...one thing we totally agree on. People should be able to see Song of the South. When they do...they can decide for themselves what the story was really all about...pay particular attention when Johnny puts his hand in Uncle Remus's hand...he does that more than once mind you...that's what friendship is all about... And, most folks understand that's about love...not hate.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-22-2012 at 05:03 PM.

  6. #51

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    We all gather things with us in our lifetimes…dreams, hopes, joys, fears…we all do. And, those things along with our environment, shape who we are…what we think…what we do…or do not do.

    And, most all of us are different. It’s our differences, and our similarities, that, together, make us strong.

    In America, we have been given the freedom to follow our dreams…to walk whatever trails we want to walk as long as we are not hurtin’ others by doing so… Most Americans would say that our freedom is a mighty valuable thing…and most Americans know that achieving that freedom…well…that’s hasn’t exactly been free.

    So…when everyone else in the world can see somethin’…enjoy somethin’…know somethin’…that we Americans can’t…I suppose it’s kinda natural that we get mor’n a little upset about that…

    We’re just not used to someone tellin’ us that we “don’t need to know about that”…that they know better than we do what’s good for us…that they’ve seen somethin’…and we shouldn’t.

    Song of the South is just such a thing. The current CEO of the Walt Disney Company says folks might get upset by it…so he’s not gonna release it…

    To my way of thinkin’ the only thing wrong with Mr. Iger’s way of thinking…is that it’s wrong.

    Using Mr. Iger’s kind of logic we’d hide away many, many films…films like:

    Snow White – cause short people might think we are making fun of them.
    Bambi – cause deer hunters might not like it…
    Pinocchio – because boys making jackasses out of themselves is too terrifying for today’s kids…
    Peter Pan – because flyin’ is just not possible…and everybody, even Peter Pan, has got to grow up…
    Mary Poppins – because…well for all those reasons Mr. Banks said…except fox hunting…he didn’t mind
    that so much…because it was ‘traditional’…but tea parties on the ceiling?
    Dumbo – because flyin’ elephants should simply not be encouraged…

    Why the Walt Disney Vaults would be absolutely packed with films people should not see!

    So…let’s look at Mr. Iger’s exact words again…

    “I said last year at our shareholder’s meeting that I had watched Song of the South again and, even though we’ve considered from time to time bringing it back, I didn’t think it was the right thing for the company to do. It was made in a different time.

    Admittedly you could use that as context, but I just felt that there are elements to the film, while it was a relatively good film, that wouldn’t necessarily sit right or feel right to a number of people today.

    And, just felt that it wouldn’t be in the best interest of our shareholders to bring it back, even though there would be some financial gain. Sometimes you make sacrifices on the financial side to do what you believe is right and that’s an example of that.

    I just don’t feel that it’s right for us to use company resources to make it available, whether it’s wide or whether it’s narrow… narrowly available.

    It’s a strong belief that I have— consulted with other top executives of the company. They all agreed, and I think, just remember it as it was, and don’t expect to see it again for… at least for awhile, if ever.”



    Now, the big problem with Mr. Iger’s position here is that a good many of us HAVE SEEN THIS FILM. And a good many of us do not agree with Mr. Iger’s position. He makes it sound like Song of the South is some horrible evil thing and, quite simply, it is the exact opposite. It’s a wonderful film, a delightful film, a film filled with powerful positive lessons about life.

    If you have not seen it…go over to YouTube, right now, and watch it. The whole thing. Then… this bein’ America and all…decide for yourself… I believe Mr. Iger…and all those “top executives” he’s talkin’ about had oughta reconsider their decision… in spite of all those fears Mr. Iger and his “top executives” have…
    Song of the South is a delightful film, a film filled with delightful lessons, positive lessons about how to meet life’s challenges…about friendship…family…and more.

    It takes a great deal of courage to do “the right thing” just like Mr. Iger says…only, in this case, he’s just a little confused about what “the right thing” is. The right thing isn’t keeping “Song of the South” hidden away in some vault somewhere…there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed of here. History happened…no matter if it
    “wouldn’t necessarily sit right or feel right to a number of people today” or not. Let the people…not the “top executives” and CEOs…make those decisions…the rest of the world seems to be doin’ just fine watchin’ this film…have confidence that those of us in America are smart enough to watch it too…

    I’m afraid Mr. Iger is lettin’ his own political leanin’s get in the way here…and those “top executives”, who
    very much appreciate Mr. Iger givin’ them a job, would tend to agree with the boss, no matter what his position might be on any given matter. I suppose no one has even had the courage to wonder “What would Walt do?”

    Let me tell ya…Walt already did it…and he did it in a time when we didn’t have a black president in the White House…he did it in a time when the Oscar winning actor who starred in the film couldn’t even attend it’s premiere because of certain unfortunate laws we had back then in Atlanta. Seems Walt had a great deal of courage in celebratin’ the wisdom of a beloved storyteller named Uncle Remus…why? Well, I s’pose it was because Walt saw the beauty, warmth, and wisdom in those stories and as he said,

    “And if, now, in “Song of the South” we have succeeded in a measure to help perpetuate a priceless literary treasure – my co-workers and I shall, indeed, be very happy.”

    Walt knew what he was doing…and he did the right thing.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol’ Dan

  7. #52

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    568

    Sad Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Kei View Post
    Iger is being a tool on this one. It should be persevered for the historical record and made available narrowly to people interested in seeing it. Most of the people that want to see it are African American btw.
    There is some support in the film community for a narrow release of the film and that may only be to colleges and universities that have film departments. The problem with mass distribution, say on DVD or Blu-Ray is "who is the target audience"? Most people in a Wal-Mart or Blockbuster don't apply any sort of context to Disney films. Believe or not, most people don't spend a whole lot of time reading Disney forums. Disney films are family films with the key target group being children. Kindly ol' Uncle Remus might be one of films greatest characters and Baskins performance is magnificent but trying to explain some of the other aspects of Song of the South to a 6 year old African-American child might be pretty tough especially when there are now a couple of generations of African-Americans who have fought the good fight to get rid of cultural stereo-typing. Some have even died for it. Think about the 6 year old African-American going to school a mass release of SOS. Maybe his mom or dad did sit down and explain the cultural ramifications and the child was wise enough to understand - but 10 of his class mates may just seen the exact movie and may have a different take on what the saw. And they may not be quite as smart. And words that should be suppressed from a child's vocabulary come out in a cruel and ridiculing way.

    Disney is a publicly held corporation. Could you imagine the social ramifications if they mass released the film and tried to explain it off by adding context? It just wouldn't work. Yes - Song of the South can be seen it its entirety. I have a copy out of Canada. But you have to work a bit to get it even if that is YouTube. By officially keeping the movie sealed from release (and yes, it is available in some other countries), Disney making the right decision.
    Writing about all things Disney, a couple of paragraphs at a time

    http://disneylandtraveler.blogspot.com/

    75,000+ page views and counting.

  8. #53

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneylandTraveler View Post
    There is some support in the film community for a narrow release of the film and that may only be to colleges and universities that have film departments. The problem with mass distribution, say on DVD or Blu-Ray is "who is the target audience"? Most people in a Wal-Mart or Blockbuster don't apply any sort of context to Disney films. Believe or not, most people don't spend a whole lot of time reading Disney forums. Disney films are family films with the key target group being children. Kindly ol' Uncle Remus might be one of films greatest characters and Baskins performance is magnificent but trying to explain some of the other aspects of Song of the South to a 6 year old African-American child might be pretty tough especially when there are now a couple of generations of African-Americans who have fought the good fight to get rid of cultural stereo-typing. Some have even died for it. Think about the 6 year old African-American going to school a mass release of SOS. Maybe his mom or dad did sit down and explain the cultural ramifications and the child was wise enough to understand - but 10 of his class mates may just seen the exact movie and may have a different take on what the saw. And they may not be quite as smart. And words that should be suppressed from a child's vocabulary come out in a cruel and ridiculing way.

    Disney is a publicly held corporation. Could you imagine the social ramifications if they mass released the film and tried to explain it off by adding context? It just wouldn't work. Yes - Song of the South can be seen it its entirety. I have a copy out of Canada. But you have to work a bit to get it even if that is YouTube. By officially keeping the movie sealed from release (and yes, it is available in some other countries), Disney making the right decision.
    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    Ya know, there’s some support beyond just the film community for a WIDE release of the film to everyone…not just colleges and universities…

    Who is the target audience? Well, everybody is…young, old, rich, poor, of all races, colors, and creeds.
    The same “target audience” Disney is aimin’ for overseas…everybody.

    Walt would not agree with you that his key target group was kids…he didn’t see it that way.

    The Academy Award winning actor who played Uncle Remus was James Baskett…not Baskins…and I surely agree with you…his performance was magnificent.

    Now let’s get to “tryin’ to explain some of the other aspects of Song of the South to a 6 year old African-American child”…I’m not exactly sure what you are talking about here…is it history that you are concerned about? What “stereo-typing” did you see? Aunt Tempe? Toby? The black folks singing songs around the campfire? Well…Aunt Tempe, seemed like a mighty nice lady to me, and Johnny sure thought a lot of her. Toby? Anyone who sees the wonder in a grandfather clock’s chimes, the magic of goin’ frog huntin’,
    or ridin’ a stick horse to get somewhere’s faster…any one who warns ya about cuttin' across that bull's pasture...is a mighty good friend to have if you ask me. Folks settin’ around the campfire together singin’ songs of joy, and hope, and faith…well I reckon I was in Scoutin’…and I’ve sat around a few campfires myself. Sang some songs too.

    Are ya talkin’ about going to work in the fields? After the Civil War, folks still had to eat…to do that they had to work...only difference was they were now paid to do it…and they were hard workers who earned their way…that’s just the way it was…

    Now, as to certain words being suppressed from a child’s vocabulary…I agree with that. And I didn’t hear a single one of ‘em in Song of the South. I have heard them though…on Comedy Central…on South Park…and other modern TV shows.

    The “bullies” in the movie Song of the South were those Favor boys… Seems to me, Johnny learned some lessons about dealin’ with bullies…from a friend of his…

    No…no…there’s a lot of imaginin’ goin’ on…about how bad, how evil “Song of the South” is…when, in reality, there is nothing bad, nothing evil, nothing racist in it. Uncle Remus is a kind, gentle, caring, and wise old storyteller. Folks lived in the South before, during, and after the Civil War…they still do. And, just like they’ve always been, some of those folks are people of faith…hard working…gentle…wise…and wonderful.

    I wouldn’t mind my kids learnin’ a lesson or two from Uncle Remus…just like I did.

    I think a lot of this nonsense about the film would fade away if more folks simply were allowed to see it.

    Yep, just as you might have figured…I think the film should be widely released once again…in theaters, on DVD and Blu-ray,

    Now as to those comedians on Comedy Central…as to the language on some of today’s “cartoon shows” like South Park and such…as to the drugs and crime and violence found in so many of today’s TV shows and movies…as to the murder, rape, and violence on newscasts these days…well…I wouldn’t mind folks doin’ away with those things…nope...not at all.

    We could all benefit from watchin’ a warm, wise, and wonderful film like Song of the South once again…


    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol’ Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-23-2012 at 01:51 PM.

  9. #54

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    568

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Ol' Dan View Post
    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    Ya know, there’s some support beyond just the film community for a WIDE release of the film to everyone…not just colleges and universities…

    Who is the target audience? Well, everybody is…young, old, rich, poor, of all races, colors, and creeds.
    The same “target audience” Disney is aimin’ for overseas…everybody.

    Walt would not agree with you that his key target group was kids…he didn’t see it that way.

    The Academy Award winning actor who played Uncle Remus was James Baskett…not Baskins…and I surely agree with you…his performance was magnificent.

    Now let’s get to “tryin’ to explain some of the other aspects of Song of the South to a 6 year old African-American child”…I’m not exactly sure what you are talking about here…is it history that you are concerned about? What “stereo-typing” did you see? Aunt Tempe? Toby? The black folks singing songs around the campfire? Well…Aunt Tempe, seemed like a mighty nice lady to me, and Johnny sure thought a lot of her. Toby? Anyone who sees the wonder in a grandfather clock’s chimes, the magic of goin’ frog huntin’,
    or ridin’ a stick horse to get somewhere’s faster…any one who warns ya about cuttin' across that bull's pasture...is a mighty good friend to have if you ask me. Folks settin’ around the campfire together singin’ songs of joy, and hope, and faith…well I reckon I was in Scoutin’…and I’ve sat around a few campfires myself. Sang some songs too.

    Are ya talkin’ about going to work in the fields? After the Civil War, folks still had to eat…to do that they had to work...only difference was they were now paid to do it…and they were hard workers who earned their way…that’s just the way it was…

    Now, as to certain words being suppressed from a child’s vocabulary…I agree with that. And I didn’t hear a single one of ‘em in Song of the South. I have heard them though…on Comedy Central…on South Park…and other modern TV shows.

    The “bullies” in the movie Song of the South were those Favor boys… Seems to me, Johnny learned some lessons about dealin’ with bullies…from a friend of his…

    No…no…there’s a lot of imaginin’ goin’ on…about how bad, how evil “Song of the South” is…when, in reality, there is nothing bad, nothing evil, nothing racist in it. Uncle Remus is a kind, gentle, caring, and wise old storyteller. Folks lived in the South before, during, and after the Civil War…they still do. And, just like they’ve always been, some of those folks are people of faith…hard working…gentle…wise…and wonderful.

    I wouldn’t mind my kids learnin’ a lesson or two from Uncle Remus…just like I did.

    I think a lot of this nonsense about the film would fade away if more folks simply were allowed to see it.

    Yep, just as you might have figured…I think the film should be widely released once again…in theaters, on DVD and Blu-ray,

    Now as to those comedians on Comedy Central…as to the language on some of today’s “cartoon shows” like South Park and such…as to the drugs and crime and violence found in so many of today’s TV shows and movies…as to the murder, rape, and violence on newscasts these days…well…I wouldn’t mind folks doin’ away with those things…nope...not at all.

    We could all benefit from watchin’ a warm, wise, and wonderful film like Song of the South once again…


    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol’ Dan
    Your words are wise Wild Ol' Dan and I felt the same way for years. Tough to explain to a youngster why there is this huge mountain in Disneyland with all sorts of wonderful, fun, mischievous, characters that you cannot show them on their televisions back home by plopping in a disc like almost everything else in the park.

    But while your arguments are fine they require a great deal of context to explain a simple children's story. People are not interested in context. It's all about the moment. All the great arguments and context in the world aren't going to convince a bunch of corporate executives along with a gaggle full of lawyers and accountants that releasing Song of the South would be in the companies best interests in 2012. It would be like whistling in a graveyard, sounds good but nobody's going to listen.

    With a couple of pushes of buttons on my TV receiver I don't have to watch Comedy Central again or ever :-)
    Writing about all things Disney, a couple of paragraphs at a time

    http://disneylandtraveler.blogspot.com/

    75,000+ page views and counting.

  10. #55

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    First, thank you for your kindness…

    Now, let’s talk a little…

    “But while your arguments are fine they require a great deal of context to explain a simple children's story. People are not interested in context. It's all about the moment. All the great arguments and context in the world aren't going to convince a bunch of corporate executives along with a gaggle full of lawyers and accountants that releasing Song of the South would be in the companies best interests in 2012. It would be like whistling in a graveyard, sounds good but nobody's going to listen.



    “It’s all about the moment.” Well, you are right, there are a lotta folks around today with absolutely no sense of history…and the folks at Disney sure seem to be giving that impression lately. Sometimes they don’t seem to have a clue that their company has a long, distinguished history…that that place down in Anaheim is far more than just an “amusement park”…over the last nearly 57 years now Disneyland has become a beloved American institution…the Ol’ Mark Twain Steamboat has carried more guests than any other steamboat in history…

    And some of us old timers…well…we were around back in those “good ol’ days”…we remember Walt Disney…we remember the magic…

    Back in those days folks kinda liked visitin’ the park…and never thought they were being ripped off by bein’ charged too much… We all felt that whatever profits the park was makin’…well, Walt would be usin’ those to bring us even more wonderful things in the future. That was a good feelin’…

    Things are not quite the same today…

    Still there is hope…there are still folks around that believe in those good old days…and good ol’ ways…
    Every time I visit the park and see a cast member sweepin’ the streets with a smile…it gives me hope.
    Disneyland is a show…and every cast member is an important part of that show. That philosophy wasn’t born in the here and now… No, it’s got roots way, way back in Disneyland history.

    So, these days “a bunch of corporate executives along with a gaggle full of lawyers and accountants are settin’ behind those desks in Burbank…parking their cars everyday in the Zorro Parking Garage…which was built on the site of the old Zorro set…and makin’ decisions. A good many of them walk through a Disney Legends courtyard on their way to that building…you know, the one with the Seven Dwarfs holding up the roof…

    Some of the youngun’s probably never heard of Fess Parker…or Annette…or Jimmy Dodd. Their memories don’t go much further back than the Wizards of Waverly Place…or Cars 2…

    So…us old timers…well…we may indeed be doin’ somethin’ like “whistlin’ in a graveyard”. And, maybe you are right…no matter how good it might sound, “nobody is gonna listen.”

    Does that mean…we stop whistlin’?

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol’ Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-23-2012 at 06:15 PM.

  11. #56

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song Of the South

    Howdy Pards,

    Seems to me I read somethin' once about Song of the South...how'd that go again? Oh yes, here tis:

    "This new Disney masterpiece is a never-to-be-forgotten musical drama of America's storied Southland. With an enchanting new kind of movie magic, it blends animated Disney stars on the same screen with human beings. The fabulous Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear make their movie debuts with performances that will rock your sides and warm your heart for many years to come. You'll never be satisfied seeing it just once!"

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  12. #57

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    568

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Ol' Dan View Post
    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    Ya know, there’s some support beyond just the film community for a WIDE release of the film to everyone…not just colleges and universities…
    I meant to comment on this. Arguably, the most influential film critic of the last 25 years or so has been Roger Ebert. Ebert is a tremondous proponent of freedom of expression through film. But even Mr. Ebert believes that the Song of the South should have limited availability, again his reasoning is protection of children.

    What about having Disney turn the Song of the South over to The Criterion Collection who specialize packaging the great films of the world for the sake of film legacy rather than commercial exploitation?
    Writing about all things Disney, a couple of paragraphs at a time

    http://disneylandtraveler.blogspot.com/

    75,000+ page views and counting.

  13. #58

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by DisneylandTraveler View Post
    I meant to comment on this. Arguably, the most influential film critic of the last 25 years or so has been Roger Ebert. Ebert is a tremondous proponent of freedom of expression through film. But even Mr. Ebert believes that the Song of the South should have limited availability, again his reasoning is protection of children.

    What about having Disney turn the Song of the South over to The Criterion Collection who specialize packaging the great films of the world for the sake of film legacy rather than commercial exploitation?
    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    I've heard of Mr. Ebert...and I've agreed with his reviews sometimes...but, I've not agreed with him other times. This is one of those other times. Mr. Ebert, of course, is a very famous film critic as you say...but...uh...so is another feller named Leonard Maltin...ever hear of him?

    Here's what he had to say...

    "Song of the South" can speak for itself. Accusations of Uncle Tomisms and quibbles over it's syrupy storyline are ultimately defeated by the film's sheer entertainment value. It has some of the most delightful moments Disney ever captured on film...and that's what really counts."

    I tend to agree with Mr. Maltin on this one.

    And, I reckon, I'll continue to advocate WIDE release of the film...in theaters, on DVD and Blu-ray. Why? Well, those of us who are real Disney fanatics have watched the film...and we already own it. I have no less than five copies myself. I love it. But, this isn't about me as an individual...it's about a great film...a wise, warm, wonderful film that celebrates a wonderful literary legacy...that celebrates a wise old black storyteller... A film by Walt Disney that has been unfairly labelled something that it absolutely is not...

    Nope...I reckon I agree with Mr. Maltin on this one...not Mr. Ebert.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan

  14. #59

    • Member
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    568

    Re: Song of the South

    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Ol' Dan View Post
    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    I've heard of Mr. Ebert...and I've agreed with his reviews sometimes...but, I've not agreed with him other times. This is one of those other times. Mr. Ebert, of course, is a very famous film critic as you say...but...uh...so is another feller named Leonard Maltin...ever hear of him?

    Here's what he had to say...

    "Song of the South" can speak for itself. Accusations of Uncle Tomisms and quibbles over it's syrupy storyline are ultimately defeated by the film's sheer entertainment value. It has some of the most delightful moments Disney ever captured on film...and that's what really counts."

    I tend to agree with Mr. Maltin on this one.

    And, I reckon, I'll continue to advocate WIDE release of the film...in theaters, on DVD and Blu-ray. Why? Well, those of us who are real Disney fanatics have watched the film...and we already own it. I have no less than five copies myself. I love it. But, this isn't about me as an individual...it's about a great film...a wise, warm, wonderful film that celebrates a wonderful literary legacy...that celebrates a wise old black storyteller... A film by Walt Disney that has been unfairly labelled something that it absolutely is not...

    Nope...I reckon I agree with Mr. Maltin on this one...not Mr. Ebert.

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    As Mr. Matlin and Mr. Ebert are very close friends, wouldn't it be a wonderful treat to have them debate and Song of the South release question? But sadly, Roger Ebert, after battling thyroid cancer for 10 years, has lost the ability to speak with his own voice. Roger Ebert has been married to an African-American woman for many years. His work (including a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism) is not one of someone who lives cultural vacuum but his life experience through marriage and of battling a disease to live one more day, a disease that has made him a shell of his former robust self gives him a perspective on life I know I will never have.

    As I said, I really wanted Song of the South to be released for many years because I saw the hole, a piece missing in Disney film history that I didn't feel was necessary. But I was being selfish. "I" wanted it to be released. Here is Ebert's simple argument that made me see it another way, through the eyes of a child.

    "Any new Disney film
    immediately becomes part of the consciousness of almost every child in America, and I would
    not want to be a black child going to school in the weeks after "Song of the South" was first
    seen by my classmates"
    Writing about all things Disney, a couple of paragraphs at a time

    http://disneylandtraveler.blogspot.com/

    75,000+ page views and counting.

  15. #60

    • Very Helpful Old Feller
    • Offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Well, reckon my heart's in Texas but right now I live down N'Olins way...
    Posts
    616

    Re: Song of the South

    Howdy DisneylandTraveler,

    "Any new Disney film immediately becomes part of the consciousness of almost every child in America, and I would not want to be a black child going to school in the weeks after "Song of the South" was first seen by my classmates"
    What exactly in Song of the South would cause Mr. Ebert to think this?

    Uncle Remus? A kind, gentle, wise black storyteller?



    Toby? A good friend who knew the importance of "frog huntin', the wonder of a grandfather clock's chimes, how to get someplace faster by ridin' a stick horse, the dangers of crossin' that bull's pasture?

    Aunt Tempe? A delightful lady with a song in her heart and a particular skill with making pies?

    The black folks singing songs of joy, hope and faith around the campfire? Hopefully that little black boy heard songs of faith, hope, and joy at church on Sunday...

    The Brer Rabbit stories about not bein' able to "run away from trouble?", the one about not getting messed up in something you had no business messin' with to begin with?, the one about everybody havin' a laughin' place?

    If I was a black kid, or a white one, or yellow, or red...I'd love the film and be kinda happy to talk about it with my friends the next day.

    Now...are there bullies like those Favor boys in the world? Of course there are, but, it seems to me this film taught some lessons about dealin' with bullies...

    Look...history happened. Not everyone was born with an executive briefcase in their hands and a silver spoon in their mouths...there were...and are...rich folks and poor folks.

    Song of the South does NOT make fun of black boys and girls...or rich boys and poor girls...if anything it celebrates the friendship between Toby and Johnny...and it celebrates the friendship between Ginny and Johnny...

    Mr. Ebert is, unfortunately, reading things into Song of the South that just ain't there.

    I watched Song of the South when I was a kid...did it motivate me to go out and make fun of my friends? Of course not.

    Now...it did motivate me to go out and look for MY laughin' place. It did motivate me to sing that song Uncle Remus taught me..."Zip a dee do dah, zip a dee ay, my oh my what a wonderful day..." And, it may just have motivated me to ask mom to bake an apple pie..."

    And I have to admit that it did take me a while to get over how clueless Johnny's Mom, Miss Sally, was to the importance of frog huntin'...and, along with Johnny, I just did not understand why she could possibly want her son to wear that collar... to me...she was one of the villians of the film along with those Favor boys...

    Mr. Ebert has lived up there in the North all his life...and he may be thinkin' that the way folks talked...the "dialect" was the problem. Well, it's kinda strange...because not all folks talk like white people up in Chicago do...

    Joel Chandler Harris understood that a big part of the wonder, the enchantment, the magic of those stories he heard as a boy...was the dialect...the exact way they were told. So, in his Uncle Remus books he set out to capture that dialect exactly as he had heard it all those years ago. Mark Twain saw the beauty in that too...so did President Roosevelt. You see some folks thought that folks who talked that way were uneducated...not very intelligent. What Joel Chandler Harris, Mark Twain, and Theodore Roosevelt knew is that they were, indeed, VERY intelligent...and VERY wise. One of the reasons those stories were so popular was that they taught valuable lessons about how to live life...lessons everyone could benefit from...once they had their ears tuned for listenin'... Those wonderful tales did a great deal to improve race relations among a lotta folks back then. Folks who were smart enough to understand that they could learn from, and benefit from them...

    Have there always been wrong headed, stubborn white folks in this world? Yep. Was there racial hatred in this world? Yep.

    Did those Uncle Remus stories, or Song of the South, do anything to inspire racial hatred? NOPE!
    Did they do anything to improve race relations? YEP!

    It seems that those stories Uncle Remus told were just as wise and wonderful to kids of all colors...

    It seems that Johnny's friendship with Toby...and with Uncle Remus...and Ginny...taught lessons about friendship...positive lessons...wonderful lessons...joy filled lessons.

    Could all that be twisted by those who carry hatred in their hearts? Well, now, that I can't exactly say...cause...well...I try not to carry hatred in my heart. When I see Song of the South I kinda look up to, and respect folks who are wise, and kind, and wonderful...and I always find myself a whole lot happier about life in general when I sing Zip-a-dee-do-dah or Everybody's Got a Laughin' Place...

    And, I don't reckon I'd mind bein' a black child going to school in the days and weeks after "Song of the South" was first seen by my classmates...shucks...I'd be singin' those happy songs right along with 'em...
    Come to think of it...that's exactly what I did...way back in those ancient times when I was a boy...

    Adios for now. Talk to ya on down the trail.

    Wild Ol' Dan
    Last edited by Wild Ol' Dan; 04-27-2012 at 03:32 PM.

Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Song of the South Being Released Fall 2006!
    By Disneyfreak in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 03-19-2006, 09:48 AM
  2. song of the south on ebay
    By ksejr1 in forum MiceChat Main Lounge
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 02-04-2006, 12:01 PM
  3. Song of the South in '06
    By Soulquarian in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 12-09-2005, 01:02 AM
  4. Splash Mountain/ Song of the South
    By AllisonWonderland in forum Walt Disney World Resort
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-26-2005, 03:25 AM
  5. Song of the South release - Fall 2006
    By BigPigletFan in forum MiceChat News Archive
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-27-2005, 04:02 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •