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  1. #1

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    Working at WDW in your 30's

    I have been considering "running away" to go work at disney for the last year now. Its always been a dream and what better time than now? My question is does anyone between the ages of 30 and 50 work there? I always see tons of college kids and retiress as CMs but rarely mid age ranges. Would I be crazy to go?

  2. #2

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    There are many, many about college age employees. At DL the average is probably 10 years older, because they don't have the huge college program.
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  3. #3

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    Many, Many people of all ages work there.
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  4. #4

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    There's plenty of 30-somethings that work there. You'll find people in all walks of life at WDW. The real challenge is the very low pay.


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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    ^This it's almost impossible to pay off massive student loan debt there...
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom.
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  6. #6

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    I worked at Disneyland when I was 18-21, and I was offended when one CM warned me, "If you're 30 and you're wearing a name tag, you have a serious career problem." But it's not the best choice if you hope to raise a family in an American, middle-class lifestyle. If you want to take great Disney vacations in Disney lodging, maybe consider dentistry. Or maybe work instead for Trader Joe's, Starbucks, In 'n' Out, or Costco instead of a Disney park.

    See the pretty good movie "Jungleland" and (I'm only recommending this to you, JessW4983), "Escape From Tomorrow"--a creepy, sleazy flick. If you STILL want to work there after seeing those, then go for it! I worked for a law firm for a summer instead of working on Disney World's Jungle Cruise and I've always wondered about that road not taken.

    I've read that theme park ride operators are among America's most over-educated workers for what they do, so you'll be working with some good people who aren't just in it for the money. You can tell when you go to Disneyland that some folks are wonderful, true believers in Walt's ideals, and I'll be grateful to you if you go forth and try to keep Disney's parks wonderful for our family when we visit.

    I wouldn't mind working there again before I retire at 72, if I could work on the Jungle Cruise, in the Haunted Mansion, on Main Street, in Guest Relations, as Tour Guide, or maybe even as a sweeper.

    I'm not a big Henry Ford fan, but to his credit he did pay his workers $5 a day (way back when you could buy some meals for 5-15 cents), so that they'd be able to afford his then impressive cars. Disney on the other hand pays its new park workers so little that they can't, if they're frugal, afford a Disney candy cane. What does it say about Bob Iger, Thomas Staggs, Meg Crofton and Jay Rasulo that (after paycheck deductions and sales tax), new cast members cannot afford to buy a Disneyland candy cane with one hour's work?
    Not much, I'm afraid.
    From Andy Castro's Dec. 2, 2013 weekly update
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    Last edited by jcruise86; 12-07-2013 at 09:13 AM.

  7. #7

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    Sadly, the price of the candy cane below is probably more than you may make an hour working as a ride operator at a theme park.


    Quote Originally Posted by jcruise86 View Post

    --Tom Sinsky

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    Quote Originally Posted by Jessw4983 View Post
    I have been considering "running away" to go work at disney for the last year now. Its always been a dream and what better time than now? My question is does anyone between the ages of 30 and 50 work there? I always see tons of college kids and retiress as CMs but rarely mid age ranges. Would I be crazy to go?
    Disney is a wonderful place, but a wonderful place does not equal a dream job.

    I actually had experience working there during college. It was quite wonderful for a while. The 6 months of wonder deteriorated into petty arguments, turf fights, and political gamesmanship. If you're over 30, are you ready for high school all over again?

    Some career advice.... Get a job that pays real money. Such a job gives you vacation, sick time, and medical insurance. You might not need to leave your desk much. You opinion matters. You leave for home at 4 or 5pm. You stay home on the weekends.

    Then go to Disneyland on your time off. You have fun while others work.

  9. #9

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    An easy way to determine if working at DWD would be feasible is to sit down and write a budget. List all of you monthly bills, account for saving 15% for retirement, and buikding an emergency fund of 3-6 months of expenses. If you can live comfortably on that budget then by all means go for it.

    If you have debts in the way of credit cards, student loans, car payments that you could only afford the minimum payments you need to look for something that pays more or plan on working two jobs.

    That is the cold hard facts by the numbers.

  10. #10

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    WDW has cast members from 18-85, no issue there, just a matter of if you think you can afford it.
    Please consider the environment before printing useless emails

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    Quote Originally Posted by HunterRose13 View Post
    An easy way to determine if working at DWD would be feasible is to sit down and write a budget. List all of you monthly bills, account for saving 15% for retirement, and buikding an emergency fund of 3-6 months of expenses. If you can live comfortably on that budget then by all means go for it.

    If you have debts in the way of credit cards, student loans, car payments that you could only afford the minimum payments you need to look for something that pays more or plan on working two jobs.

    That is the cold hard facts by the numbers.
    Huh? You need to do a budget to figure out that Disney DOESN'T pay the bills. A job that pays $10 to $12 dollars an hour will not give you any money to fund retirement or an emergency fund. You won't live comfortably. You'll barely survive. But if this is what you want, then go for it. Be prepared to look for a new job in 1 to 5 years.

    Perhaps you can just work at Disney on a part time basis. Just try it out before you go full crazy.

  12. #12

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    The funny thing is the field I work in currently,(preschool teacher), pays in that 10 to 12 range already... so financially I would be about the same. Which is broke I fully admit. However if I was there I wouldn't not have the commitments I currently have which keep me from working a second job so I could potentially earn more there.
    As far as the work environment goes, does the high school mentality filter into the more career oriented job there as well?

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    I don't see it as financially the same. A pre-school teacher might have more steady hours than a Disneyland employee working part-time even though they get the same hourly pay. I just wonder why you think you can't work at Disney as a second job. Most pre-schoolers get out by 3pm or earlier unless their parents want to keep them there longer with extended hours. You might also have the summer off since less parents keep them there. You can work at Disney as a part-time casual employee. As with any retail job (I've had experience with this), there is no job security. Your hours are subject to change at any moment. You can easily find yourself without any scheduled hours. Thus, you're effectively laid off. Turnover is a big deal with employees.

    The high school mentality rests with the character of the job. You're paid to do manual labor. No thinking required. It isn't a career. It is a job. If you wish to apply for a salaried job, there is less politics, but you still have to contend with the bleed off of the Disneyland culture within the salaried ranks.

  14. #14

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenW View Post
    . . . I just wonder why you think you can't work at Disney as a second job. Most pre-schoolers get out by 3pm or earlier unless their parents want to keep them there longer with extended hours. You might also have the summer off. . .
    Working at Disney World during a summer might be a good plan.
    I did this, gulp, 30 years ago, when I was, uh, 9?
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  15. #15

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    Re: Working at WDW in your 30's

    I have worked at Disney for 10 years now and I do have to say that it has been the most rewarding job I have ever had. I started working for Disney when I was 43 years old. Yes, the pay may be low, and there were times where I had to scrape to get by, but at other times the hours were there where I could work a lot of overtime which then helped me get caught up. I love the jobs that I have done at Disney and have never regretted coming to Disney. A lot of people today only look at what actually appears in the net pay section of their paycheck. You also have to look at the benefits, and everything else that go along wit the job. I have had several jobs in my lifetime and for the work I do the pay has been, for the most part, comparable. I won't get rich at Disney and I know that. I do however enjoy going to work everyday and I am proud to say I work for Walt Disney World when asked. I have had a few jobs in the past that did pay more than Disney, but I was not happy there, hated going to work and was miserable all the time. I'm not saying that there are bad days working here, but they are far and few when compared to other jobs I've had.

    There is a huge difference between those that WANT to work at Disney and those that are just there to collect a paycheck every week. I chose to work here. I moved to Orlando just to work at Disney. I think it was the best decision I have made and I am very happy and enjoy my job very much. Working for Disney is not for everyone, but if it is something that you want to do then go for it. You may find out it is not for you, or you may find it is what was meant for you to do. WDW has jobs for virtually every profession you may want. I have done jobs at Disney that I never would have thought I would do, and loved each one in their own way, I have even done one job that I often dreamed of doing (drive a Disney Monorail) and I have Disney to thank for it.

    Through my career at Disney I have known people that have been in the same position for 15,20, or even 30 years. I have changed jobs several times, starting off at the Front Desk/Concierge in a resort and becoming a trainer, supervisor, back office support. After a few years I went to PhotoPass and was a photographer and a coordinator. After a few years of that I went to Monorails for a few years and now back at the front desk and Concierge as well as a trainer. When schedule bids come out there is always this gap which is noticeable you have a number of people that have been there 10 years or more then there is just a handful of people there in the 3-10 year range and the a whole bunch that are less than 3 years. I would say that if you are there at least 3 years you are likely there the long haul.

    If you don't at least try you will never know.
    Last edited by ti2gr; 12-22-2013 at 10:28 AM.

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